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Author Topic: sun bonnet facing  (Read 1521 times)
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Marjorie
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« on: May 31, 2014, 07:57:53 PM »

I am making sunbonnets for my girls (3 and 17) using printed cotton.  It's quilting weight, but it's what I have.

I'm making them both corded, but using Liz's pattern at least for my little one.  We're going to see how it turns out before teen dd decides if she wants to use that pattern or the Timely Tresses one I used for myself.

What do I use for facing the brim?  The Timely Tresses pattern says to use the same fabric, but Liz's says "a light cotton".  does this mean a light solid, like broadcloth or muslin?  should it, can it, be a different color or pattern than the outer material?

I'm using a bright yellow print, so I'm not sure if it will give the skin a yellow cast.

Ideas?  I'd love to start on them tomorrow.
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Marjorie
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« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2014, 06:49:17 AM »

Another sunbonnet question -

I corded the brim last night, and tried it on 3 yo daughter this morning.  I haven't put the hem or ties in.  The cape is much shorter than I'd like.she does have a big head (no really  Cheesy 98%ile head at her well baby checkups) but I figured the 3-7 size would be okay.

It covers her neck but barely any of her shoulders, and I'd like it for sun protection on her upper back.

Is there any way to lengthen the cape at this point? Would it be okay to add an extra, oh, 2-3 inches of fabric and just sew it on?  I'm not sure how or if bonnets were pieced. 
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EKorsmo
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« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2014, 11:27:39 AM »

I've been checking through mfa and met online collections, and in answer to your first query, all the examples I can find have self-fabric facing--or at least, the brim facings are not obvious contrasting. When the fabric is specified beyond "cotton", it's lighter fabrics like dimity, pique and cambric that are named; so if you were adding a separate lining, opting for a very light-weight one is probably a good idea; it'll also make for a lighter and more airy bonnet. 

I haven't seen any examples with patched/pieced curtains, but some have decorative ruffles (which could add length or cover a piecing seam):
http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/168305?rpp=30&pg=4&ao=on&ft=bonnet&when=A.D.+1800-1900&pos=93
http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/169880

Not a children's clothing expert by any means, but it seems more common to have contrast stripes and other obvious piecing/enlarging on children's clothes on than on adults'.  If a longer curtain can't be cut, I'd think you'd be fine with with adding a self-fabric ruffle(s), or sewing on another piece, as you proposed.  Hopefully the experts will chime in soon.   
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2014, 11:37:19 AM »

I'd take the curtain off, match the fabric motifs well, and piece in extra length at the neckline edge or add a self-fabric frill at the edge to lengthen it.

The facings are quite often self-fabric, but you can use other things that shadow better than the yellow likely will; pink is one thing I've seen in some period notes, actually! By "light cotton", I mean light in color and light in weight, too... something that won't soak up too much heat, or weigh heavily on the noggin.
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Regards,
Elizabeth
Marjorie
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« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2014, 01:44:04 PM »

I think I'm going to go with a self-fabric ruffle.  It will be cute and little girly, and I like how the first pic EKorsmo posted looks.

Hopefully it will be easier than piecing the fabric/matching patterns, too, something I've never actually done before.
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