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MaryDee
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« Reply #20 on: April 04, 2014, 11:35:30 AM »

Kona isn't nearly as good as Pimatex (I have samples of both), but it's definitely more within my budget, especially with the 40-50% off JoAnn's coupons for the former.  It's still far better quality than quilting cotton.  Of course if you're going to be wearing the item daily (instead of at 6-7 events per year, like me), you definitely want the Pimatex. 

Pimatex is available at fabric.com, but it's rather pricey! 
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Ginger Lane
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« Reply #21 on: April 04, 2014, 12:40:15 PM »

Pimatex is slightly cheaper at Dharma Trading Company, with a quantity discount.

http://www.dharmatrading.com/fabric/cotton/finelywoven.html
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Mrs.Dixon
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« Reply #22 on: April 04, 2014, 09:50:41 PM »

Even if you are unable to afford a better cotton for the entirety of your under garments, your corded petti is a lot of work and time. You won't want to make another for yourself for a while if your can help it. I made mine with regular muslin and I regret it to this day. I wish I had utilized a finer cotton for something I put hours upon hours of time into.
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Anneliese Meck
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« Reply #23 on: April 05, 2014, 07:04:42 PM »

MaryDee, Ginger & Mrs.Dixon, thank you for your input! Cheesy  I will be wearing my corded petticoat daily (interning and interpreting at a living history museum this season!!) so I'm willing to make the investment. Thanks also for the pimatex link!
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bevinmacrae
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« Reply #24 on: May 29, 2014, 08:26:25 AM »

I'm a little late in seeing this, but thought I would put my two cents in, as well.

I have currently access to two original corded petticoats here at work.

One is made of a really stiff, yet lightweight and sheer material. It is very similar to cotton organdy it how it behaves and I think that would be a good substitute if one was trying to reproduce this petticoat. For cording, a cotton similar in diameter to close line cord was used, and was tucked into the fabric.

When I reproduced this petticoat, I found it to be really good at traveling. The organdy is stiff without needing starch, so it also has virtually no change to it's loft during humid days. I also thought it was pretty lightweight for the amount and size of the cording put into it. If it starts to get squished from daily wear and sitting, I simply press it and it springs back to life. I would definitely use organdy for future corded petticoats. I also find that the larger cords are not uncomfortable.

The costuming department here recently made a corded petticoat of organdy, but using the peaches and cream cord for cording. Results are really nice! Light, but lofty and smooth. Less bumps than with the closeline.

The second original here at work is a petticoat with the fine cords woven in to the fabric and then the panels sewn into a petticoat. It was sold in my hometown store and has the name of the store inked onto the waistband.

We have also reproduced this petticoat with the weaver here at work. The cording is very similar to the peaches and cream, and the rest of the threads is alot like fine crochet thread. Unstarched, the thing feels and behaves like a heavy rag rug, but starched, it is much lighter. The cords hold the starch very well. The original was quite stiff in areas which leads me to believe that it, too, was starched. Certainly, I do not think it would be anything other than a warm layer without being starched. So far, humidity and even direct exposure to water does not seem to have had a very noticeable affect on it. I think that the cords really suck up and hold in the starch. I do find that I may have starched it a little TOO much though, since it's hard to sit in.

I have made a third corded petticoat using the pima cotton and the sandwich method with peaches and cream cord. In my case, I found it wilted quickly if not excessively starched, and I preferred to wear the organdy one for the most part. The fabric also is so tightly woven that flecks of the starch seem to flake off of it continuously even after being misted and pressed. Right now, it's the last one I go to wear.

So, if I had to make another, I would choose the cotton organdy with the peaches and cream cord. Though, I don't mind the closeline at all either!

Bevin
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Bevin MacRae

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Miss Lydia
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« Reply #25 on: May 29, 2014, 12:09:24 PM »

Bevin, how would a cotton like a batiste work? I bought cotton batiste to make chemises and after handling it thought it might make a good base fabric for a corded petticoat. Cotton organdy is the same price as the batiste on the website (Vogue fabrics), should I just go with that? Here's the link to it: https://209.236.66.199/Cotton-Organdy-Fabric.html

Oh, it looks like they're all out of batiste for the moment. Still, in general would it be a decent fabric to use?
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Jessamyn
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« Reply #26 on: May 29, 2014, 01:35:24 PM »

Bevin, thank you so much for that detailed rundown and comparison. Lots of great information there!

Miss Lydia, I couldn't say for sure, but since batiste totally lacks the inbuilt crispness and spring of organdy, I think you'd suffer some of the same problems as the pima - especially the total reliance on starch.
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Miss Lydia
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« Reply #27 on: May 29, 2014, 02:49:06 PM »

I went right ahead and bought myself enough organdy to make a 90" circumference petticoat and enough sugar n' cream yarn to cord to Kingdom come!  Cheesy
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Anneliese Meck
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« Reply #28 on: June 20, 2014, 10:45:29 AM »

Bevin, wow, lots of great information!  Thank you so much, I really appreciate all of your expertise!! Cheesy (Ooh, I do remember you showing me the woven corded petticoat - that was quite interesting!)  If (or when) I make another corded petticoat, I'll definitely use organdy because the not having to starch all of the time is very appealing.  As is the clothesline part...

I ended up cording the bottom first grouping with a smaller cotton clothesline, and am still working on the rest of the sugar'n cream cording rows.  I'm not sure of the historical accuracy of this design, but I'm definitely open to sewing suggestions.  I'm having trouble with keeping the fabric from bunching and the rows straight.
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #29 on: June 20, 2014, 12:12:40 PM »

Anneliese, are you using a sewing machine on the corded petticoat, and if so, are you using a zipper foot?
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Anneliese Meck
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« Reply #30 on: June 21, 2014, 06:16:17 PM »

I am using both a sewing machine and a zipper foot.  It seems that my machine is catching the layers (sandwiching method) at different times, just enough to make an ugly bunch and throw the next row off  Huh
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Allison vV
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« Reply #31 on: June 21, 2014, 09:35:52 PM »

Miss Meck, do you mean that your fabric is becoming bunched (as if you gathered it), or that the thread is becoming knotted underneath your fabric?  If you could post a picture, that might help clarify.  That definitely doesn't sound like something that "should" be happening Smiley.
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Allison van Vegten


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Anneliese Meck
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« Reply #32 on: June 22, 2014, 03:18:15 PM »

Allison - (feel free to call me Anneliese, Miss Meck refers to the more mature members of my family  Wink Wink Grin
Unfortunately I won't have a camera again until next week, otherwise I would post pictures.  I'll do my best to describe my situation: the first, the fabric is bunching almost as if gathering and then every so often it will make a really long/large stitch.  This then messes up the layers as now the end of one entire side is slanted.  Hope this makes a little sense...thanks!
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Allison vV
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« Reply #33 on: June 22, 2014, 04:13:45 PM »

Anneliese Smiley, I may know how to help solve your problem.  I've had this before many times; especially when it would frustrate me the most.

This may sound very basic, but, surprisingly, it always works (barring a major problem with your machine, of course).

1.  Unthread your machine -- top thread and bobbin -- completely.
2.  Check to make sure your top and bobbin threads are exactly the same (bobbin from the same spool).  If you use two different thread weights, they almost always jam the machine.
3.  Check your top thread tension.  Is this set to a reasonable number for your fabric weight?  (you may need to check your owners manual, I do.)
4.  Make sure that your needle is sharp.  Barely perceptible burrs, or a blunt tip can cause snagging of the fabric.  I learned to frequently change needles from Mrs. Clark Smiley.
5.  Check your bobbin compartment for pieces of thread that might be catching.
6. Carefully rethread your machine, making sure everything goes in the proper direction/place.  Missing one hook/keeper has a greater effect than might be realized.

This may be more than you need, but the most important thing (and often quickest fix) is to just rethread the machine.  But you might as well check everything while you're at it to remove all doubt.  When I just check things over by eye, I usually miss something.  Giving everything a clean start will hopefully help solve your problem.

Anything is better than having to take out the seam ripper!  Wink
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Allison van Vegten


"Procrastination is the thief of time. Collar him!" Charles Dickens

"It's the job that's never started as takes longest to finish." J. R. R. Tolkien
Elizabeth
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« Reply #34 on: June 22, 2014, 09:59:08 PM »

Dittos the above, as it always pays to start with the free fixes first!

And you may need to use a differential feed foot, which moves the top fabrics along at the same speed as the bottom fabric near the feed-dogs.

You can also stitch a few rows one direction, then flip everything over and stitch the other direction. This helps even the tension out, and gives you better straightness.
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Elizabeth
Anneliese Meck
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« Reply #35 on: June 23, 2014, 10:02:07 AM »

Thank you both for all of the suggestions - I'm eager to make better progress on this corded petticoat! 

Allison - ah yes, the wonderful rethreading trick!  It usually fixes all of my problems, but this time it just doesn't want to work.  I'll have to replace my needle and check the thread tension, though, I didn't think of those before, thanks!  Digging out the owners manual now Smiley


Anything is better than having to take out the seam ripper!  Wink


Agreed, this project is setting new seam ripping records...

Mrs. Clark - If the above doesn't work, I'll definitely look into a differential feed foot - I've never heard of it, but it seems pretty handy!  And I'm going to start switching stitching directions, that sounds like a great idea (especially if it helps with straightness) - thank you very much! Cheesy
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Allison vV
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« Reply #36 on: June 23, 2014, 11:00:08 AM »

You're welcome, and I hope you get your problem solved.  I'm surprised rethreading didn't work.  Hopefully you will find something that does.

Agreed, this project is setting new seam ripping records...

I am very sorry.  I empathize Cry.

I'm pretty sure the presser foot is called and even feed or walking foot.  It's a fairly standard foot, you should be able to find one that fits/is made for your machine.  Someday, I would like to have one, too.
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Allison van Vegten


"Procrastination is the thief of time. Collar him!" Charles Dickens

"It's the job that's never started as takes longest to finish." J. R. R. Tolkien
Miss Ruth
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« Reply #37 on: June 26, 2014, 07:06:34 AM »

Well... now I know how to fix bunching!  Smiley I had had no clue before what was going on! I had had to take some seams out of some projects before for this very reason. Sometimes I got so irritated I would just hand sew it!
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