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Author Topic: need some input 'designing' a dress  (Read 4931 times)
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Mrs Johnson
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« on: February 13, 2014, 02:48:47 PM »

this is the fabric, it's cotton.  DD will be 9.  it'll be short sleeved.  i need input for the bodice, i think i'll do puffed sleeves.


little DD's dress is the same fabric in blue, infant bodice and undecided on the sleeves as of yet.  i might try my hand at scallops, lol.
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~ Jennifer
Marta Vincent
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« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2014, 07:21:16 AM »

The fabric would lend itself nicely to a yoked bodice.  Use the fabric crosswise for yoke, waistband & sleeve bands; and if you want, a trim band in the skirt.  The gathered bodice below the yoke will allow for 'growing room, if she starts to develop.  Also make nice big side seams & a bit of extra length in the bodice.  With the fullness of the bodice, if it's a bit 'blousey' this season, it'll look cute and also allow growing room so she can wear it another year or two.  Front buttoned or back; your/her choice at her age.  Tucks in the skirt...

Very pretty!
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2014, 03:17:25 PM »

A yoke would be really sweet in this! The fuller fabric in the lower bodice can be pleated (toward the center) or box pleated, to show off the stripe element really well. Ditto on giving extra length/width for growth; use hooks to fasten the back waist so you can stash the extra length in the waistband (diagrams and instructions are in the booklet.)

Using the stripe around the waist would be a keen touch; use straight-grain white fabric to interline it, and it will be stable and non-see-through.

Bound scallops would be awfully sweet! So would a short full open sleeve (hey, scallops!) with a puffed undersleeve basted in.
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Elizabeth
Mrs Johnson
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« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2014, 05:20:47 PM »

thank you for the ideas!  i can't wait to get started on them!
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~ Jennifer
Mrs Johnson
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« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2014, 02:08:54 PM »

i'm just now getting around to this.  DH has been deployed and we spent a while with family. 


How would i go about doing bound scallops?
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~ Jennifer
Allison vV
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« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2014, 02:41:00 PM »

I'm not sure if this works for your application, but I have done two different types of scallops on a skirt ruffle and belt streamer. 

The top edge of the skirt ruffle was cut on the straight grain and bound before being gathered to the skirt hem.  At even intervals I tacked the top edge down (perpendicular to the hem), gathering or "scrunching" to make the scallop.

On the belt streamer, the scallop design was cut into the fabric and then bound with ribbon.  If you use bias binding, it should work nicely around the curves.

I hope this helps some.
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Allison van Vegten


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"It's the job that's never started as takes longest to finish." J. R. R. Tolkien
Elizabeth
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« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2014, 08:19:29 PM »

The bound scallops on dresses are generally done the second way Allison mentions: actual shapes that have the bias binding wrapping the edge, quite narrow (1/4" at the max). I've seen self-binding and also velvet contrast binding.
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Elizabeth
Mrs Johnson
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« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2014, 10:48:23 PM »

would i start with a strip of fabric, fold the raw edges under and then bind the scalloped edge?  what width should i start with, to not end up with a lot of bulk with the turned edges at the curves?

or a narrow velvet ribbon?
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~ Jennifer
Allison vV
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« Reply #8 on: August 13, 2014, 08:12:42 AM »

If I'm understanding correctly, you are asking if the scalloped edged should be turned under and then bound.  The raw scalloped edges need not be turned under, only bound.  The binding will sufficiently protect the raw edge.  This reduces all bulk and eliminates the difficulty of turned edges on tight curves.

As for your binding, this is up to your preference, but one thought that I had was that velvet ribbon will be harder to manipulate around the curves than bias binding.  If you prefer the velvet ribbon you may just have to work carefully by hand.  Another option to facilitate the use of velvet ribbon is to do a narrow 1/8" hem on scallops, and apply the ribbon to the right side of the fabric as a trim.  However, you still have to work it around the curves, and I'm not sure how small your scallops are.
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Allison van Vegten


"Procrastination is the thief of time. Collar him!" Charles Dickens

"It's the job that's never started as takes longest to finish." J. R. R. Tolkien
E L Watkins-Morris
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« Reply #9 on: August 14, 2014, 06:38:07 AM »

Less fiddly scallops:
1. Trace pattern onto the fabric along the desired finished hem line
2. Apply the binding or trim
3. Trim off excess fabric.
4. Hem or finish binding.

-no waste
-more control over how the trim is laid/shaped
-fabric has more structure while being worked, less stretching or bunching.

Liz W.
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