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Author Topic: plaid? and types of wool? unders?  (Read 2168 times)
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Mrs Johnson
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« on: November 15, 2013, 07:22:38 PM »

i'd like to do a pair of plaid trousers for one or both of my boys, probably my 7yo, my 11yo is a bit more afraid of being 'different'.  is that PC?

what about herringbone?  tweed?  what type of wool should I be looking at for trousers?  a jacket?  outerwear?

can I do a pair of wool trousers that can be worn in the spring/summer and layer them over a pair of flannel drawers?

the temps will probably be in the 40-50's.... it'll be February.
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EKorsmo
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« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2013, 08:03:03 PM »

I don't know much about boys' clothes, but I did a quick glance through both volumes of The Way They Were, and found 4 boys (ranging from just-out-skirts to teenage) in pants with a small check pattern. Another had what might have been a narrow stripe or another check, and all the rest were in solid colors.  The matching coat/pants combo occurs more often than a contrasting coat and pants (about 28 to 14), and almost all of the buttoned-together shirt/pant suits are of a single fabric (though at least one boy has a contrasting shirt/pant out of this style).  There is one boy with a plaid shirt and solid pants (the plaid is the same in as the dress of the girl next to him), and another with a check top and solid bottoms.

It's possible that some of the checks were plaids which washed out when photographed (the dress in my avatar is a plaid in real life, but looks like a check in wet-plate photos because the narrower lines wash out); by a wide margin, though, solids seem to be the most common option.

I did find this plaid suit, but it's for a rather younger boy:
http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/159177?rpp=60&pg=1&rndkey=20131115&ao=onft=*&when=A.D.+1800-1900&what=Costume|Wool|Suits&pos=5
 
(the hyperlink doesn't seem to be cooperating, but you can copy & paste the URL).

Good luck! 
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2013, 11:45:24 PM »

It also matters whether you're pushing for the 60s, or the 40s (the board spans roughly 1840-1865).

All through, you'd be perfectly fine with solid wools (look at lighter weight wool for warmer weather, and I'd say, don't go over an 10oz wool). A worsted broadcloth is going to have a smooth feel to it, and a nice finished look (not bulky/puffy).
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Elizabeth
Mrs Johnson
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« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2013, 09:52:21 AM »

can my 7yo wear a tunic?  i'd like to do something different for each of them, if possible.

and where can I find CDVs or any other photos.  I think I can do the trousers without a pattern, if I can see what they look like... especially the backside, lol.
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KatelynH
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« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2013, 10:44:01 AM »

I usually look for CDVs on Pinterest and Ebay.  I just search for 'civil war photo' (be careful: some people label things 'civil war' when they really aren't).  Some people have a collection of CDVs on their websites (like Anna Allen: http://www.thegracefullady.com/civilwargowns/cdvs_children.htm).  I would also try looking at museums' online collections to look at actual garments.  The MET and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston have a good collection of mid-century stuff you can view online.  You can search the MET's collection here: http://www.metmuseum.org/collections/search-the-collections and the MFA here: http://www.mfa.org/search/collections.  You can also find several original garments on Pinterest.
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Mrs Johnson
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« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2013, 11:09:36 AM »

thank you. I've been looking through pinterest, but most of them are either dark or the waistbands are covered... or both lol.
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Marta Vincent
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« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2013, 12:15:22 PM »

Your 7yo can certainly wear a tunic.  The Fashion prints & full size patterns I sew from give a number of tunics for boys age 6-8.  Beyond that, though, he will look like a mini-dad.

Plaid trousers were very popular for men and boys.

Here are a few images that may help you out.  http://www.pinterest.com/martavincent/19th-c-children-s-clothing/
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Mrs Johnson
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« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2013, 05:22:11 PM »

would these work?  for trousers or a jacket or sack coat

#1 http://www.fashionfabricsclub.com/Prod/26032-sage-green-plaid-wool

#2 http://www.fashionfabricsclub.com/Prod/24971-antique-gold-plaid-wool-suiting

#3 http://www.fashionfabricsclub.com/Prod/24948-light-brown-plaid-wool-suiting

#4 http://www.fashionfabricsclub.com/Prod/24217-charcoal-gold-plaid-wool-suiting


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Elizabeth
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« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2013, 08:20:49 AM »

The shapes for boy's and men's things mid-century are different than you might expect; before winging it, take a look on-line for period men's tailoring manuals (such as DeVere's) from the 1850s and 1860s. These have drafting shapes and notes for the right geometry, which in turn gives the right look. Smiley
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Elizabeth
Mrs Johnson
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« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2013, 09:33:09 AM »

yes, i'm planning on getting devere's from the gentleman on the board.  just have to wait till next payday, lol.
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~ Jennifer
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