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Author Topic: Dressing my Gal, Part 2: Dress Options... Help!  (Read 3633 times)
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John Wickett
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« on: September 25, 2013, 12:39:48 PM »

Here are some pics of my kiddo's dress fabric:
http://s267.photobucket.com/user/LibertyHallVols/media/DSC09219_zpsb7402417.jpg.html
http://s267.photobucket.com/user/LibertyHallVols/media/DSC09217_zps2be1ff17.jpg.html

I wanted to ask about opinions for dress styles from a couple different aspects:
1) Events she is likely to attend in the near future are in October near Knoxville and Olustee in February.  May be "warm" or "cool" to cold.  Not sure if I should be thinking long or short sleeve, given that we live in Georgia where summers are HOT.  

2) Not sure what style options will look good with this fabric.  I picked it because my gal loves purple and this fabric has it.  However, it is not at all "Homespun-looking".  So, I'm not sure if the dress should be more formal or "distinctly middle class" looking or...?  

EDIT:
I should probably note that I am using Liz's dress pattern for girls.  Thanks!


...so many options!

Thanks!
« Last Edit: September 25, 2013, 01:01:41 PM by John Wickett » Logged

John Wickett
Micaila
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« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2013, 02:23:32 PM »

If it were me, I'd go with a yoked bodice with the lower portion pleated to hide/reveal certain elements of the print.
Does your daughter tend to run hot, or cold? I'd let this dictate the length of sleeve.
Love the fabric, by the way!!!
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2013, 10:18:15 AM »

Oh, fun choice of fabrics! I like that!

Linear designs do tend to look really neat with a yoked bodice, and that also builds in more growing room for pre-teen girls, but the fabric would look great with any of the bodice styles. I'm with Micaila in that I think it will "show off" a LOT with pleating in the lower bodice, to hide/reveal different portions of the print.

You can do *any* of the sleeves with the yoked bodice; I tend to think, for 60s and cool weather and a linear design, coat sleeves cut on the bias are really nifty. It's a common sleeve, so you're right in the middle of the PEC arc, but has a lot of style just with the bias lines created when you cut the sleeves out. With a nice fabric like this, you don't have to worry about adding trim or anything. The print is the "decoration" all on its own.

While she won't look rag-tag or home-spun, there's nothing about the print that would push it beyond a good solid working class home, so I don't think you'll have a mis-match child/parent economic levels at all.

To build in some weather flexibility, I would bring in Miss Wickett, and a 60" square of wool in a nice color, and show her how to fringe out 1" on all sides, creating a cozy shawl to add if she's chilly (or a picnic blanket to sit on if its not!)

With her age, chances are she'll be needing some size changes by next spring when it gets hot again; save back about 1/4 yard of the fabric if possible, and plan to replace the long sleeve with a short sleeve for summer use (though you can just cut the long sleeve short and hem the edge with a bit of a bias frill, if you're shy on fabric when the dress is finished and can't save back extra for a totally new sleeve.)
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Elizabeth
John Wickett
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« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2013, 12:57:05 PM »

Thanks, Ladies!
I think I have 8 or 9 yards of the stuff.  I didn't want to run out! Wink

I'm in agreement on the yoked bodice and coat sleeves. 

Liz:
1) Cutting sleaves on the bias... diagonal (45-degrees) to the grain, right?
2) How do I fringe out the wool 1" on all sides?? Wink 

Also, instructions mention sewing with double-layer fabric... does that include the skirt?

Thanks a bunch!  I've got to (start and) finish this dress in a couple weeks! 

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John Wickett
Elizabeth
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« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2013, 01:16:20 PM »

Yep, that's exactly right on bias placement. Smiley

The bodice and coat sleeves are very often flat-lined in children's clothing, but you don't have to do that with the skirts.

I know you're tongue in cheek on the fringe, but just for archival purposes and future searching:

1: If the wool is really loosely woven, run a row of straight stitches about 1.25" from the edge, all the way around the square.

2: Make a snip from the edge toward that stitching line, but not through it, every 3-4" or so. If the wool is fairly tightly woven, you can skip the row of stitching, and just be careful with your edge-toward-insides snips.

3: use a skewer or chopstitck to help you loosen and remove the threads parallel to each edge.

Those snips make it a LOT faster and less head-achey to remove the threads and create the fringe!

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Elizabeth
MaryDee
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« Reply #5 on: September 27, 2013, 10:13:59 AM »

I'm looking forward to pictures of Miss Wickett in all her new clothes!
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John Wickett
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« Reply #6 on: October 07, 2013, 05:19:34 AM »

Progress is going well!  Here's what's left...
- Sleeves
- Add hooks & eyes for back closure
- Final length adjustment for undergarments
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John Wickett
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« Reply #7 on: October 07, 2013, 12:06:53 PM »

cannot wait to see!
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~ Jennifer
John Wickett
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« Reply #8 on: October 08, 2013, 06:01:54 PM »

OK... getting there... couple more questions...

1) Coat sleeves.  I cut 'em on the bias and am getting ready to assemble. 
Instructions say...
"Leave 2-3" of the inner arm seam open near the wrist..."
This sounds like the cuff will close on the opposite side that one typically sees on a men's shirt.  Is this correct?

2) ...still on the sleeves, talking about cuff...
"Hem the wrist placket as you did for a cuffed Bishop sleeve"
I see those instructions on the previous page, but it doesn't mention how wide the finished cuff should be. 

Thanks!!

(Hoping to see a wetplate artist this weekend!)
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John Wickett
John Wickett
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« Reply #9 on: October 13, 2013, 07:12:32 AM »

OK, here we go!

My gal loves the animals!


A wetplate by Wendall Decker...


With Terre Lawson getting a spinning lesson (She is REALLY excited to keep working on it!)...


Thanks to everyone for the help!  She had a wonderful day and couldn't stop chattering about it in the car on the way home.  I think she's hooked... Mission accomplished!!  Smiley
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John Wickett
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« Reply #10 on: October 13, 2013, 08:42:41 AM »

lovely!
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~ Jennifer
Elizabeth
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« Reply #11 on: October 13, 2013, 11:45:17 AM »

John, I'm so sorry I missed your question on the cuffs! You did them well without me. Smiley

She looks splendid! What a charming young lady, and it looks like you had a grand time!
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #12 on: October 13, 2013, 03:41:02 PM »

Oh she is lovely, Mr. Wickett! Perfectly adorable!  Smiley Awesome job!
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"Favor is deceitful and beauty is vain; but a woman that feareth the LORD, she shall be praised."

 Proverbs 31:30

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Trish B
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« Reply #13 on: October 13, 2013, 04:52:19 PM »

She looks absolutely precious!  Wish I could see her in person.  Lovely job!  trish B.
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MaryDee
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« Reply #14 on: October 13, 2013, 04:55:26 PM »

She is lovely!  Congratulations on a beautifully done job!
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Theresa W
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« Reply #15 on: October 15, 2013, 05:27:22 AM »

Wow!  It all turned out so well-she looks excellent! Smiley (she probably feels excellent too Cheesy)  I love the wetplate!  If I didn't know any better, I could have mistaken ya'll for the OC Cheesy!  You've done great!!!
~Theresa Smiley
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Veronica Carey
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« Reply #16 on: October 15, 2013, 06:23:46 AM »

What fabulous photos!  That wetplate is sure to totally confuse your descendants, looking at "old" early 21st century photos of y'all!
Your daughter and her dress look wonderful.  You have earned your Good Dad Award for the year, for sure!
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BetsyConnolly
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« Reply #17 on: October 15, 2013, 08:01:27 AM »

She looks just lovely! Like she stepped right out of a BBC miniseries. A really accurate miniseries with really excellent clothing Cheesy
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Betsy Connolly
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