Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: cocktail straw  (Read 3221 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Sue Leurgans
Veteran Scribbler
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 696



« on: August 27, 2013, 01:46:18 PM »

Does anyone know what a straw used for cocktails was made of?

Brian Koenig do you know?
Logged

Sue Leurgans
AKA Miss Lawrence
"The secret of happiness is something to do" - John Burroughs
hanktrent
Senior Research
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1089


« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2013, 04:07:49 PM »

Either straw, or glass. From Jerry Thomas "How to Mix Drinks," 1862:



Same book, p. 15: "Sip through a glass tube or straw."

Hank Trent
hanktrent@gmail.com
Logged
Malinda Byrne
Veteran Scribbler
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 618



WWW
« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2013, 06:36:05 PM »

Sue,
Lehman's has glass straws, but they are kind of pricey and they look to be sort of big.  https://www.lehmans.com/p-984-glass-drinking-straws.aspx
Malinda
Logged

Malinda Byrne
Sue Leurgans
Veteran Scribbler
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 696



« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2013, 07:07:27 PM »

pricey! wow!

 So a straw is actual straw?

Must be a large variety and sturdy, as any piece of straw can remember would not hold up to the vacumn created with sucking.  Roll Eyes   Just running other materials through my head... tin, rubber, bamboo, what else? Macaroni?   all right, that's just silly.   
 Nothing makes sense unless there is a stiff variety of grain that works. The business end of broom corn is stiff, but not hollow.  Is the upper part that I have never seen, hollow?
Logged

Sue Leurgans
AKA Miss Lawrence
"The secret of happiness is something to do" - John Burroughs
hanktrent
Senior Research
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1089


« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2013, 08:48:05 PM »

pricey! wow!

 So a straw is actual straw?

Must be a large variety and sturdy, as any piece of straw can remember would not hold up to the vacumn created with sucking.  Roll Eyes   Just running other materials through my head... tin, rubber, bamboo, what else? Macaroni?   all right, that's just silly.   
 Nothing makes sense unless there is a stiff variety of grain that works. The business end of broom corn is stiff, but not hollow.  Is the upper part that I have never seen, hollow?

I was surprised that it wouldn't work, so went out to the shed and got a few pieces and tried them. There's not much that survives a baler unbent, but I was able to find two or three stems that were still intact for three or four inches. I'm not sure if it's wheat or oat straw, looks like wheat. Obviously unbaled from the sheaf would be the way to go to get nice long pieces like the illustration, but they all sucked just fine, no problem.

Hank Trent
hanktrent@gmail.com
Logged
Sue Leurgans
Veteran Scribbler
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 696



« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2013, 11:43:04 AM »

Well this city girl is going to have to find some straw somewhere and see what can be done.

Thanks for checking, using what you have.
Logged

Sue Leurgans
AKA Miss Lawrence
"The secret of happiness is something to do" - John Burroughs
Stacey Nadeau
Guest
« Reply #6 on: August 28, 2013, 01:43:05 PM »

Try broom straw, it's got a bit more body.
Logged
Maggie Koenig
Research
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1477


« Reply #7 on: August 28, 2013, 06:47:58 PM »

Macaroni was also an option.
Logged

Maggie Koenig
Gettysburg, PA

"If you can't make it good, you can at least make it shiny!"
Sue Leurgans
Veteran Scribbler
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 696



« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2013, 08:31:07 AM »

Macaroni was also an option.

seriously! 

I thought I was being silly!
Logged

Sue Leurgans
AKA Miss Lawrence
"The secret of happiness is something to do" - John Burroughs
Sue Leurgans
Veteran Scribbler
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 696



« Reply #9 on: September 02, 2013, 09:36:33 AM »

Talked with my dairy farmer sister (sister by choice)  and she talked with her husband.

Oat straw and wheat straw would work, but all theirs is flattened by the baler. Wheat straw is a little stiffer than oat straw.

Canary reed grass was/is native to the US and works as a straw also. 

She gave me some Canary reed grass and with trimming between nodes the straws are about 6" long. Maximum length of a straw with the sample she gave me would be about 8".   Hopefully, trialing of the straws to be done this coming weekend at Zoar OH.
Logged

Sue Leurgans
AKA Miss Lawrence
"The secret of happiness is something to do" - John Burroughs
Maggie Koenig
Research
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1477


« Reply #10 on: September 03, 2013, 07:13:46 AM »

The macaroni works really well.  Its what all the drinks at Greenfield Village's Eagle Tavern comes with.
Logged

Maggie Koenig
Gettysburg, PA

"If you can't make it good, you can at least make it shiny!"
Sue Leurgans
Veteran Scribbler
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 696



« Reply #11 on: September 03, 2013, 07:31:19 AM »

Do they make their own or is macaroni that is long enough available some where?

Logged

Sue Leurgans
AKA Miss Lawrence
"The secret of happiness is something to do" - John Burroughs
Anna Worden Bauersmith
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3609



WWW
« Reply #12 on: September 03, 2013, 08:33:52 AM »

Wegmans, in Henrietta, has some full length macaroni strands.
Logged

Anna Worden Bauersmith
http://annaworden.wordpress.com/
Straw & Winter Millinery - Available on Etsy
Fanciful Utility: Victorian Sewing Cases & Needle-books
From Field to Fashion: The Straw Bonnet
hanktrent
Senior Research
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1089


« Reply #13 on: September 03, 2013, 10:04:34 AM »

Just curious--not doubting it--what's the documentation for macaroni?

Hank Trent
hanktrent@gmail.com
Logged
Maggie Koenig
Research
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1477


« Reply #14 on: September 03, 2013, 10:36:02 AM »

I apologize everyone.  When I asked Brian about the macaroni straws I misunderstood his reply.  He said "can't" I heard "can" when I asked if he could document them.  Macaroni straws were not used at the time....at least for alcoholic drinks which is the context he was researching at the time.  Teaches me to ask from another room while holding a fussy baby.

Thanks for asking about specifics Hank.  I wouldn't have asked again otherwise.

His research indicated glass only for alcohol.
Logged

Maggie Koenig
Gettysburg, PA

"If you can't make it good, you can at least make it shiny!"
Veronica Carey
Guest
« Reply #15 on: September 03, 2013, 11:17:18 AM »

I buy Timothy hay from various sources for my rabbit.  Some of the coarser bits can certainly work as straws, albeit short ones due to the harvesting.  Even though they are flattened out, a quick pinch makes them useable.  Just not long enough.  (only 4 or 5 inches or shorter)
Logged
Sue Leurgans
Veteran Scribbler
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 696



« Reply #16 on: September 04, 2013, 12:14:36 PM »

Just found glass straws here.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Clear-Glass-Straw-Single-Glass-Drinking-Straw-Standard-9-5mm-/200925986285?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&var=&hash=item2ec81f3ded

More affordable and seems to be made by the vendor.
Logged

Sue Leurgans
AKA Miss Lawrence
"The secret of happiness is something to do" - John Burroughs
Miss Ruth
Veteran Scribbler
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 545



WWW
« Reply #17 on: September 04, 2013, 02:09:49 PM »

Hmmm... looking a bit too large to me (think diameter not length) am I right?
Logged

"Favor is deceitful and beauty is vain; but a woman that feareth the LORD, she shall be praised."

 Proverbs 31:30

http://sewingroomtales.blogspot.com/
Stephanie Brennan
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1054



« Reply #18 on: September 06, 2013, 04:49:56 AM »

Reeds are an option.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines