Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Enlarging Workwoman's Guide Drawers  (Read 6634 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
GillianF
New Scribbler
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 15


« on: August 24, 2013, 07:21:45 PM »

If this has already been covered somewhere and I missed it, my apologies, but I just can't seem to find an answer.

Well, I'm braving the world of men's clothing for the first time and have hit a potential snag.

I've scaled up the men's drawers from plate 7 of the Workwoman's Guide, but it is my understanding that they are sized to fit a waist of about 32". Unfortunately, that does not happen to be the exact size needed for (somewhat soon to be) DH. (silly me, forgot to make sure he conformed to standard size period patterns before agreeing to go out with him all those years ago Grin) The calf measure seems to be fine, as does the inseam and rise height/depth. It appears as though the only problem area is going to be the waist measurement. My question is how exactly to go about adjusting the waist up by 6" or so?

My initial thought was to slash lengthwise down the middle and spread the waist edge to where I want it, making sure to keep the proportions correct in terms of how much extra fullness is needed per inch at the waist, while keeping the calf edge barely connected so that its measure doesn't change. I was concerned, though, that this might distort the pattern too much. My secondary though was to enlarge the entire pattern to the proper waist measure, and then taper the legs back down to a comfortable size as/if necessary. My concern with this version was possibly creating too much bagginess overall. My third theory was to forget the current pattern as it sits now, and just adjust the sizing as one would Elizabeth's women's drawers pattern, based on actual body measures, but that could just be me making this way harder than it needs to be.

Any suggestions? Am I missing some typical way of dealing with this?

Thank you in advance for any help offered!
Gillian
Logged
Elizabeth
Administrator
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7894


WWW
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2013, 07:42:59 PM »

It's probable that all his body measurements will be to a different scale than the original draft, so I'd draft the WWG version out, and see where and by how much specific measures may need to change, if doing it myself.

Be sure you're drafting it up to the right scale, too: some of the plates have measures in inches, and others are listed in nails (one nail is 1/16 of a yard, or 2.25").
Logged

Regards,
Elizabeth
GillianF
New Scribbler
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 15


« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2013, 09:19:35 PM »

It would seem I know what I will be doing tomorrow. I have already scaled it up on paper and cut it out, so I will cut test material based on that and put it all together so I can see where changes will be needed. This diagram was certainly in nails, though it took me a few moments the other night to realize that -- I just couldn't figure out why the measurements were so tiny. Thank you for the note that there is a mix of inches and nails in the book though *putting sticky note inside front cover*. That will certainly save me some confusion in the future!

Fingers crossed the necessary changes will be more obvious once I've made him play test-fit tomorrow.

Thank you for the advice!
Logged
Jessamyn
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3095



« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2013, 05:51:43 AM »

Some men put all their weight right on the belly, so it is possible that you may need to adjust only the very top of the pattern. When you cut out your mockup, draw the outline on the muslin and cut very wide seam allowances. You may want to baste it wrong sides together. Then it's easy to rip the seams down from the top right there on him and repin. Pin along the new seam lines as if you were taking big stitches with the pins.
Logged
Jim_Ruley
Senior Research
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1389


Tailor at work


« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2013, 07:12:47 AM »

Quote
My question is how exactly to go about adjusting the waist up by 6" or so?


If you have DeVere's book, he shows how to adjust trousers for "thin and stout waists" in Plate 17.  You should be able to apply the same method to drawers.
Logged
GillianF
New Scribbler
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 15


« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2013, 10:45:20 AM »

Jessamyn, thank you for that suggestion as that does seem the case. In the 7 years that I've known him, his measures have not changed by more than a 1/4" inch or so anywhere other than at his waist, regardless of the amount of weight gained or lost.

Jim, I do not yet have a copy of DeVere's book, though it has been at the top of my to-get list since I nosed through a copy during my final semester at school. Maybe this will be my motivation to just go ahead and order it.

Now to dig out some scrap material. I know I've got some unbleached muslin floating around from before I knew better... might as well put it to use.

Thank you all for your help! I will report back once I've gotten him to stand still long enough for a good trial run.
Logged
GillianF
New Scribbler
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 15


« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2014, 01:46:49 PM »

Hi all,

I know it's been a while Embarrassed but I'm back with a question (sorry!).

I've worked up the WWG drawers such that they have enough room in the seat and don't bind when he moves, but the extra triangle insert doesn't seem to want to do anything other than sit as a bunched up wad at his waist.

Given this, I decided to put that one on the backburner in frustration and try another pattern, this time from the May 1863 (I think) Sanitary Commission Bulletin (This pattern here http://lh5.ggpht.com/azreenactor/R3xiqTFjqNI/AAAAAAAADTc/h7e-orxNR58/s800/USSC+Flannel+Drawers.jpg). I've got it to the point where it fits him, however the legs seem, well, baggy I guess would be the word.

This brings me to the question: does anyone know of a picture, either modern or period, that shows a properly fitted pair of drawers on an actual person? I have scoured the internet and can find plenty of pictures showing them flat on a table or on a legless mannequin, but nothing that gives me a good idea of how these things should actually fit, particularly with regards to how much excess around the legs and, if I'm lucky, how a pair with the triangle piece is supposed to look. In digging through old threads, there was reference to a LOC picture, but the link is dead and I've had no luck finding anything that I think could have been the one  Cry .

If such a picture doesn't really exist, is it okay to put up pictures/links to an album for some critiquing? Or should the absence of any pictures on the forum be my clue to a "no men's drawers pictures" rule?

Thank you!

p.s. I haven't been able to find a copy of Deveres (at least not one that wasn't in the neighborhood of a couple hundred dollars), but I did find enough info (I think) from a Williams Clothiers tutorial mentioned in an old thread to be able work up a basic pair of trousers, in case the real test of a pair of drawers is to try them under trousers.

-Gillian

Logged
Jim_Ruley
Senior Research
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1389


Tailor at work


« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2014, 04:45:37 PM »

p.s. I haven't been able to find a copy of Deveres (at least not one that wasn't in the neighborhood of a couple hundred dollars)..

Send me a PM Smiley...

Thanks,

Jim R.
Logged
Jessamyn
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3095



« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2014, 08:13:01 PM »

I can't imagine anyone objecting to you posting pictures of your husband's drawers in situ. We certainly have images of women in various states of undress - and requesting similar types of assistance - in the ladies' undergarment section! It does sound as if you've reached the {picture = 1,000 words} situation in more ways than one.
Logged
Mr. Ferrell
Guest
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2014, 01:18:55 PM »

If your husband's waist is within a few inches of the WWG waist you can simply cut the waistband to fit him and the rest of the drawers will simply have fewer gathers into the waistband. The waistband is cut in two parts, but remember that you'll need to have some overlap in front for the buttons. The back is adjusted with laces, so you could even be a little small and it will still fit (although if you go too small there will be a substantial gap in back - but you could fill this in with a triangular wedge sewn into the gap). Keep in mind that the WWG pattern does not include any seam allowances, so you'll have to add those around all sides of the waistband pieces.
Logged
GillianF
New Scribbler
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 15


« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2014, 11:06:46 PM »

Mr. Ruley, consider yourself PM'd as of a minute or two ago.  Smiley

Jessamyn, thank you for the 'appropriate' vote. I kind of figured it was okay, but since there didn't seem to be any on the board, I was afraid it was just one of those no-go things.

Mr. Ferrell, I gave it a go as you noted to begin with, which is when I found that his waist is actually closer to the original size than I had first thought. The waistband was pretty reasonable, however there wasn't nearly enough room through the seat (he's got a bit of a tush Tongue ) so I cut new legs with bigger seam allowances per one of Jessamyn's earlier suggestions and just left the waistband alone.

Given the bunchy triangles in the WWG version, I think I'm going to stick with the USSC pattern. Here are pictures of the front and back:(There are pictures of the WWG drawers in the album as well in case someone that has made those up before has a better idea of what the triangles are actually supposed to do when worn.)
Front:http://s28.photobucket.com/user/gillybilly727/media/Sewing/Rs%20Clothing/USSCDrawersFront.jpg.html?sort=3&o=2
Back:http://s28.photobucket.com/user/gillybilly727/media/Sewing/Rs%20Clothing/USCDrawersBack2.jpg.html?sort=3&o=3

He says they are perfectly comfortable, which is why I'm throwing together a pair in white cotton that he can wear around the house just to make sure, but they just look like they would be terribly bunchy under a pair of trousers (though I did hand pinch out some of the 'excess' and have him squat at which point I had to let go of the pinched out material for fear of a seam giving out). To anyone who makes, studies, and/or wears men's drawers, do these look decently right? If not, any and all suggestions are welcome, as I want to get his under layers set before moving on to getting/making the rest of his clothing - 'from the skin out' is the phrase, I believe.

Thank you, everyone, for all your help!
Gillian
Logged
Rob Bruno
Frequent Scribbler
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 112


« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2014, 08:12:16 AM »

Hi Gillian,
I have made a similar pair of drawers though a slightly different pattern and they look about the same.  I made one from canton flannel and another from a plain weave cotton.  They are loose and baggy too.  I wear them no matter how hot the temperature and they do not bind or feel uncomfortable.  They actually make my jean cloth more comfortable.  The fit fine because my pants are also loose and baggy compared to modern pants.  Mine have the buttons in the front and draw strings in the back and some times they have a hard time staying in place, but everything kind of settles into place and it is no big deal.  I am sure they are designed the way they are cause of the kind of movement and work that was being done by men at the time and the type of material available for making the garments.  I ride at events so I am mounting and dismounting my horse which requires room in the seat with a fabric that doesn't stretch much.  Anyway, mine are fine and don't both me at all.
Rob
Logged
GillianF
New Scribbler
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 15


« Reply #12 on: March 07, 2014, 10:53:20 AM »

Mr. Bruno,

Thank you! I've nearly finished the pair noted in my last post and am glad to know that someone else has had good luck with something similar, and in situations that are more demanding of clothing than what DH will likely be doing in the near future, no less.
After realizing that he was going to be first of the two of us to have hand sewn undergarments, the pride and mock-jealousy gave way to the fear that maybe there was something glaringly wrong that would make the time I had put into them a waste. Your vote of confidence with regards to the fit has made me much less hesitant to go ahead and make the eyelets and buttonholes.

Again, Thank you!

-Gillian
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines