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Ceph
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« on: May 15, 2013, 10:15:51 AM »

For tea - Did they typically use a tin or copper pot like what we put on the stove today to steep the tea?  Or would the norm have been to heat the water up and pour it into a china or ceramic tea pot with the leaves to steep?  The latter was how my Great Grandmother served tea - and how I do it to do.

This is probably a stupid question...but you don't put china or ceramic near a fire right?

sorry for the random question of the day post.

~Cate
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melissamary
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« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2013, 11:04:27 AM »

Normally, the water would be boiled in a copper or tin kettle on the fire, and then the boiling water would be poured over leaves in a china or silver tea pot. Smiley
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Ceph
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« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2013, 11:57:41 AM »

Is something like this period appropriate?

http://images.shopgoodwill.com/134/5-8-2013/sa533580958-ks.jpg

It's silver over copper.
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Sue Leurgans
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« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2013, 12:03:10 PM »

hopefully your copper pot is tinned.

I know that heat and copper can result in some sort of noxious product that is harmful to ingest.    The exception seems to be if your preserving fruit.

Wondering about the chemistry on this. Does anyone know exactly what happens when you have heated copper and food?

Any ceramic item had survived a kiln at  a temperature of hm?... 1300 degrees and up, I think, will survive the heat of a fire.  So heating them or baking with them is fine, assuming the glaze doesn't have lead in it.  I set my teapot by the fire to warm it up when appropriate.
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Sue Leurgans
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« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2013, 12:04:24 PM »

Silver plate is correct. The exact style... dunno.
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Sue Leurgans
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« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2013, 05:00:25 PM »

Is something like this period appropriate?

http://images.shopgoodwill.com/134/5-8-2013/sa533580958-ks.jpg

It's silver over copper.

The pot that you are showing is not meant to be heated directly near a fire.

This is an example of a teapot that can be heated near a fire...

http://www.hotdiptin.com/culinary/tea-pot.html

The spout is designed to accommodate tea leaves. 
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Marta Vincent
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« Reply #6 on: May 16, 2013, 06:05:04 AM »

Actually, I think that oneis a coffee pot not a tea pot.  Teapots tend to be short & squat and coffee pots tall and slender.  And then there is a completely separate category of chocolate pots. Wink Our own Barbara Smith posted a great group of images of various kinds of pots on Facebook in answer to a similar query.  If you are a member of FB, look for Babette la Mauvaise.
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Anna Worden Bauersmith
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« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2013, 08:01:16 AM »

I know that heat and copper can result in some sort of noxious product that is harmful to ingest.    The exception seems to be if your preserving fruit.

Now you have me wondering about the copper. I've seen a modern resurgence in copper cookware. Mom wants some. I'm going to have to look inside the copper pans (modern and antique) I see.
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Anna Worden Bauersmith
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MrsPeebles
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« Reply #8 on: May 16, 2013, 10:14:05 AM »

Is something like this period appropriate?

http://images.shopgoodwill.com/134/5-8-2013/sa533580958-ks.jpg



I'm pretty sure that is a coffee pot, and later. Another thing that some forgot to mention, some tea sets had a pot to hold and keep water warm for refreshing the tea pot.

Ditto what Marta said!
« Last Edit: May 16, 2013, 10:16:52 AM by MrsPeebles » Logged
Emily Barry
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« Reply #9 on: May 16, 2013, 11:28:07 AM »

hopefully your copper pot is tinned.

I know that heat and copper can result in some sort of noxious product that is harmful to ingest.    The exception seems to be if your preserving fruit.

Wondering about the chemistry on this. Does anyone know exactly what happens when you have heated copper and food?

Any ceramic item had survived a kiln at  a temperature of hm?... 1300 degrees and up, I think, will survive the heat of a fire.  So heating them or baking with them is fine, assuming the glaze doesn't have lead in it.  I set my teapot by the fire to warm it up when appropriate.

A few notes:  The heat in a kiln is evenly distributed and there are no sudden temperature changes.  So placing a ceramic item in the oven, especially with food or liquid in it, should be fine, but be very careful placing a ceramic item on a hot surface, such as a stove.  I learned this the hard way.  At an event, I was trying to heat up some of my transferware bowls (long story, involving a midnight raid by mice...) on the wood-burning stove.  The bowl that had water in it was fine (I suspect the water helped distribute the heat more evenly), but the empty bowl cracked right down the middle.  Cry  Placing a teapot near the fire to heat gradually should be fine, though.

Regarding copper, pretty much all modern copper cookware is lined with tin or stainless steel.  Tin conducts heat better (which, after all, is what makes copper so great for cooking with) but as a softer metal requires more care to maintain.  Stainless steel is more low-maintenance but somewhat deadens the heat conductivity, as well as (for our purposes) being non-period correct.
I think the danger of copper has more to do with the acid content of the food, doesn't it?  The combination of heat and acid causing copper oxide (which is poisonous) to leach into the food.  That is mysterious about fruit preserving, though, as most fruits are fairly acidic.  Maybe it's the high sugar content?

That is, indeed, a coffee pot.  Think, "I'm a little tea pot, short and stout..."  Wink
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Sue Leurgans
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« Reply #10 on: May 17, 2013, 06:59:05 AM »

 Good point about just placing a ceramic dish on heat.

Copper oxide, thanks for that.  I do wonder about preserving fruit as it is usually acidic. You would think that it would cause a problem.  Have to do more research on this.
Godey's and Peterson's sometimes recommend bell metal (brass) saucepan for preserving fruit.  I have not read or heard of any issues with brass and cooking, but brass saucepans are rare.

The only time I have seen a copper pan that was not tinned, it looked like the tin finish was scrubbed off.  Tin does wear off and pots can be retinned.  I was just looking at retinning today, and there is a place in Lima OH, that I want to call and talk to about getting all sorts of items retinned.


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Sue Leurgans
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Ceph
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« Reply #11 on: May 20, 2013, 12:38:12 PM »

Thank Ya'll for the great information.  Now I have a better idea of the fluid serving ware of the time.

Thanks again!

~Cate
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