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Author Topic: Books on Man's Perspective on Trip West to Oregon  (Read 4000 times)
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Paula
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« on: March 02, 2013, 09:42:06 AM »

The Series Covered Wagon Women offers such a great perspective of the trip west from a woman's point of view.  I need a few suggestions on sources of the man's perspective.  Not the normal travel guide but actual journals.  Anyone know of some?
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Ms. Jean
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« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2013, 12:30:28 PM »


Paula,

There's not so much personal here, but The Prairie Traveler by Randolph B. Marcy was supposedly well-read and widely carried.  Capt. Marcy was a cavalry officer.  A fort in Santa Fe, New Mexico was named for him and the site is now Fort Marcy Park.  I am most familiar with his writings related to the Santa Fe Trail.

http://www.amazon.com/Prairie-Traveler-Randolph-Marcy/dp/0918222893/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1362251839&sr=1-3&keywords=captain+marcy


Oh!  You can get an idea of the usefulness on our favorite Google Books:

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/23066/23066-h/23066-h.htm

I know that we avoid supposition here on the S.A., but I expect people reaching Oregon after 1860 may have carried, discussed, and relied on Marcy's book.


Hope this helps,

Jean
Route 66
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Ms. Jean
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Micaila
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« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2013, 12:44:03 PM »

Paula,
I know there are some out there, but they don't tend to get published as often.
Men's journals tend to record mileage and weather and not much else Wink

Micaila
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Paula
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« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2013, 03:17:32 PM »

Yep I agree Micaila just hoping to find that strange man who could write more than numbers.   Grin
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shawnra
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« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2013, 05:21:18 PM »

I like Alonzo Delano's book http://books.google.com/books?id=LXgUAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=inauthor:alonzo+inauthor:delano&hl=en&sa=X&ei=C5YyUaPwF6Gu2QWfy4DQCA&ved=0CDsQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false


You may also find something amongst these titles: https://www.google.com/search?tbo=p&tbm=bks&q=subject:%22Overland+journeys+to+the+Pacific%22&tbs=,bkv:f&num=50
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Heidi Hollister
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« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2013, 12:31:13 AM »

John Minto has a good one.

James Akin Jr. has a very typically male one, but it's still fun to read, even if it IS just to laugh in disbelief at how briefly and matter-of-factly he describes the death and burial of his mother on the trail.
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Muriel Carbiener
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"Hannah Perkins" at The High Desert Museum.


« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2013, 08:43:47 AM »

Maybe you can get some of these in Inter Library Loan.

These three are published by OCTA:
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Muriel Carbiener
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"Hannah Perkins" at The High Desert Museum.


« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2013, 09:33:22 AM »

Lets start this again  Smiley
Published by OCTA:
   "From the Old Northwest to the Pacific Northwest: Patterson & Michael Luark": edited by Howard Jabion
   "The 1854 Oregon Trail Diary of Winfield Scott Ebey"; Edited by Susan Badger Doyle
"Overland in 1846: Diaries and Letters of the California-Oregon Trail" Vol. I; Dale Morgan. 9 different men
"A Day With the Cow Column, 1843" Jesse Applegate
"Andrew McClure, Journal of the Oregon Trail, 1853", Lane County Historical Society.  This is the Elliot Wagon Trail that comes across Central OR.
"My Trip Across the Plains, Benjamin Franklin Owens, 1853".  "      "      "
"What I Saw in California"  Edwin Bryant - very detailed, day by day on the trail west - a classic trail book
"At the Extreminity of Civilization, 1849", Dr. Israel Lord, edited by Necia Liles - very detailed
"Journal of Travels, Over the Oregon Trail in 1845", Joel Palmer
"Powerful Rocky, the Blue Mountains and the Oregon Trail", John Evans - a lot of citations from men's diaries (and women too).  You can    also learn a lot about the I-84 section of the trail.  (DH, Gail & I worked with Mr. Evans about 10 years ago for good locations for two trail markers.)

Let me know if you want details on any of these.  I can also tell you about others who end up in CA, but are on the main OR Trail before turning onto the CA Trail.

Muriel
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Heidi Hollister
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« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2013, 11:30:03 PM »

I knew we just had to wait for the treasure trove that is Muriel came along...

I forgot about Joel Palmer!  I knew there was another one at the tip of my tongue that I couldn't remember.  That was it!
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mmescher
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« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2013, 03:03:25 PM »

We also carry the book Crossing the Plains about an 1857 trip from Missouri to California.  This book is in stock at Ragged Soldier Sutlery.

Michael Mescher
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anne foster
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« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2013, 05:55:00 PM »

If you search WorldCat, www.worldcat.org, with the search string: su:overland journeys -women -fiction kw:diar? su:oregon
you'll get more than 300 titles. Some are broader histories, but there are a lot of reprinted diaries as well. A lot were published in the 1960s and 1970s just prior to the sudden discovery that women's history was really interesting, too(!). You can probably get them on interlibrary loan.

Anne Foster
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MaryDee
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« Reply #11 on: November 17, 2013, 09:21:55 PM »

This is a trip to California, not Oregon, but of course the first half of the trail was the same.  Have you read William Manley's "Death Valley in '49"?  It's a fascinating account.  Manley first wanted to avoid Utah (having heard horror stories about Mormons, none of which, of course, were true, as he eventually found out) by floating down the Green River.  Fortunately, before he reached the worst canyons, he met the Ute Chief Walker who managed to convince him that this was not a good way to go.  After a winter in Salt Lake City, Manley and his group tried a shortcut that, as you can tell from the title, ended up in the wrong place.  It's very readable and can be read online here:
http://www.californiagenealogy.org/death_valley/index.htm
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Carolann Schmitt
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« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2013, 07:38:25 PM »

Thanks, Muriel!  Now I have to find more room on my bookshelves.  Smiley  You also supplied a big chunk of my Christmas wish list; Don's getting off easy this year.

Carolann
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Muriel Carbiener
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"Hannah Perkins" at The High Desert Museum.


« Reply #13 on: November 22, 2013, 08:03:46 AM »

In my opinion these are the two best books I have ever read on the emigrant trails west.  Will Bagley is an outstanding researcher and writer.  He has completed two of the four volumes of "Overland West".  There are many diary quotes from both men and women.

Volume I: "So Rugged and Mountainous, Blazing the Trails to Oregon and California, 1812-1848"
Volume II: "With Golden Visions Bright Before Them, Trails to the Mining West, 1849-1852"

Muriel
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