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Author Topic: Common linen doll ? American girls book  (Read 2594 times)
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Rhea B
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« on: February 19, 2013, 04:27:43 AM »

Hi, I'm having a go at making a rolled doll for my little girl using the instructions in the American girls book.  I've folded the fabric in half and rolled it up tight, gathered the top together and sewn from the top to half way down (to her waist)? so far so good.  However I'm having real trouble with the bottom of the doll.  It says from the waist the fabric must go as loose as possible and spread out to form something like a petticoat, also mentions the doll should be able to stand by itself.  Now the problem I'm having is the fabric at the bottom wont spread out ? it just stays tightly rolled.  There's no way this little lady is going to stand by herself.  Is there something obvious I?ve missed?  Tempted to chop off the bottom and give her legs!   Grin 

Many Thanks, Rhea
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Mother Dean
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« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2013, 01:44:52 PM »

Mine didn't stand by themselves either, until they were "dressed" and then it's still iffy. The bottom does flair out a bit and the dress fabric helps a bit as well. When I was making mine, I was hoping that they would get more stable with use. The girls packed them up with their other event toys as soon as they got them  Huh  so it will be a while before my hopes are confirmed.
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Rhea B
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« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2013, 03:52:28 AM »

Hmmm, my bottom doesn't really flair out at all  Undecided  just stays tightly wrapped apart from a flap at the end of the fabric.  Maybe I'll try some more experimenting. If not a nice stiff petticoat might be in order. Thanks for your reply Smiley
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mmescher
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« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2013, 06:45:54 PM »

In the kit I carry on my Ragged Soldier website, the rolled fabric doll kit contains a booklet that took the approximately one page of instructions from the American Girl's Book and elaborates until you have about 8 pages of instructions along with illustrations.

The petticoat doesn't flare out much.  It is more a flap then anything else.

By the time you get to the step of making the doll stand, you should have finished the top so it forms a puckered dome.  The stitching to make this dome will seal that end of the roll.  Since the rolling and stitching tend to make the "foot" end bulge out a little, you then push on the "foot" end and pack the rolls tightly up toward the head.  Then pull out a pair of stout but sharp scissors and cut enough off the bottom so that the bottom of the roll is flat and at right angle to the long axis of the doll.  This does take some strength in the hands so the instructions tell children they may need to get the help of an adult to do this step.  After the foot end is flattened, if you cut it at the proper angle so it stands straight up, the roll should stand up.  If it is cut much off of 90 degrees from the vertical, you will have a lean.

Even with a lean, another post said that it is easier to get it to stand with its dress on.  That is a correct statement.  Just don't attach the dress too high.  It should billow out nicely around the doll.

Michael Mescher (and doll Amanda)
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Rhea B
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« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2013, 09:40:19 AM »

Thank you   Smiley I've made a second slightly smaller dolly and she's coming along much better.  Makes sense now I know that the bottom doesn't spread as much as the original instructions seem to suggest  Grin  I'll try and post a photo of her when I've finished.
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mmescher
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« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2013, 05:55:14 PM »

I forgot to mention that you should avoid making the doll too slender.  The thicker it is, the easier it will stand.  And the recipient will love it just the same if it is a bit thicker than you might want to make it.

Michael Mescher
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Rhea B
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« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2013, 12:43:33 PM »

Finally finished my dolly - here she is!   Thanks for all the help.  If you're interested you can see more pics on my blog  Smiley

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mmescher
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« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2013, 08:13:54 PM »

While this doll is cute, if it is to be used to represent a civil war era doll, I was wondering about the documentation for it's adornments.  Of the rolled dolls I've seen, none had hair, fancy clothes, or a very fancy face.  When they have a face at all, it is just drawn on, probably with a pencil, and consists of two dot eyes and a smiling mouth.  The clothes have been very crudely done without any trim.  These were simple dolls the girls could make themselves (and in the case of the Children of Bledensfield, throw in the river) and to me this doll is way fancier than any period construction.  I think if an adult was going to go to this length to make a fancy doll, they would go beyond a rolled fabric doll style. 

Michael Mescher
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