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Author Topic: Ms. Clark's doll  (Read 23947 times)
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RachelJ
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« on: September 01, 2012, 06:11:56 AM »

Hello everyone!

I purchased Ms. Clark's doll pattern last year and have yet to make her up. I need inspiration, lol. Has anyone finished the doll and maybe even some of her accessories?  I would love to see pictures, if you would be kind enough to post them here. 

Thank you!
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Heidi Hollister
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« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2012, 01:41:39 PM »

I made a doll inspired by her pattern, gave it feet and painted on shoes.  I painted her hair and face on and stuffed her with wheat bran, but failed to put a stick in her neck... so it flops around like it's broken.  I'm looking for pictures.  I know I took some but I can't find them.  They may be on this site.
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Elaine Robeck
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« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2012, 07:43:39 PM »

No pictures yet, but I made her about 2 weeks ago.  I was "Mom of the Year." My daughter was thrilled to graduate from a rolled doll to a doll with legs.  We raided to scrap box like I imagine little girls and mothers did then, too.  I pretty much followed the pattern as far as design and didn't put any bell or whistles on her because the doll was meant for play and not display or demonstration.  Have fun!  We had a wonderful time.
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vmescher
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« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2012, 02:07:00 AM »

I made a doll inspired by her pattern, gave it feet and painted on shoes.  I painted her hair and face on and stuffed her with wheat bran, but failed to put a stick in her neck... so it flops around like it's broken.  I'm looking for pictures.  I know I took some but I can't find them.  They may be on this site.

I made a doll for my granddaughter a couple of years ago and just stuffed it with fiberfill and I didn't put a stick in her neck.  I can't recall what Liz's directions were but I you could use either cotton or wool batting, modern fiberfill, or just rags but when with many washing, the batting and fiberfill will clump.  Rags may stay put better.  You could use bran but the neck will eventually flop.  In my opinion, cloth dolls were made to be soft and cuddly and didn't always have their heads on straight. Bran will make a harder stuffing and may not as snugly and would not be washable.  Washing is always desirable.

I think in the American Girl's book (185?) had jointed doll instructions but can't remember what her stuffing is. 

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Elizabeth
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« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2012, 04:23:49 PM »

Here are a few dollies on the main site: http://www.thesewingacademy.com/2011/09/how-many-dolls-do-you-see/

I also have some new pictures from a whole group of ladies that will go up on the main site in a week or two! In the works, when I get back from visiting in-laws on the Gulf Coast, are some gallery requests. Smiley
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Elizabeth
Mrs Campbell
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« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2013, 06:35:39 AM »

I just purchased Mrs Clarks doll pattern. I am excited to get the pattern and get started!
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« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2013, 06:43:48 PM »

Mrs C...  she's on her way to you!
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Elizabeth
Mrs Campbell
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« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2013, 11:35:14 AM »

I received her! I am excited to start!
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lkfend
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« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2013, 10:26:41 AM »

I would LOVE to see any of the doll pictures. I too am using Ms. Clark's doll pattern.

QUESTION: If I were a mother in 1856 Illinois and I was making a very special doll for my daughter, what would I stuff her with? I thought about bits of wool or cotton. I also thought about using the cotton scarps of material left from making pinafores and petticoats. What do you think the 1856 mother would used to stuff the doll?

(No Hobby Lobby, Michaels, Jo-Ann Fabric, or Hancock Fabric in 1856 Springfield, Illinois.)

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Elaine Robeck
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« Reply #9 on: March 15, 2013, 06:41:46 PM »

Bran (but that will spoil if it gets wet) wool, cotton.  Are you making this you a real child to play with?  If so I would use wool or cotton and really stuff it.  I used a bamboo stuffing because I had it at home.  The stuffing has compressed and Esther the dolly is a little floppy especially in the neck.  You could stiffen it by putting a stick in the body, but my daughter plays and sleeps with her doll so we haven't done that.  I think using fabic scraps would be lumpy. 
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Ms. Jean
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« Reply #10 on: March 16, 2013, 03:42:33 AM »


Re: neck flop in fabric dolls


I expect that we've all been reading the Common Linen Doll posts.

Instead of a stick, how about using a roll of linen (or corset scrap twill) inside the fabric doll's neck?

I know that we avoid guessing here and would prefer documentation for this, but a roll of stiffer fabric would help hold the head without poking and the technique of rolling fabric was used in dolls.

Has anyone tried this?

I'll be out of town today, so just aim that snood towards Route 66!   Roll Eyes

Jean
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Elaine Robeck
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« Reply #11 on: March 16, 2013, 04:04:40 PM »




Instead of a stick, how about using a roll of linen (or corset scrap twill) inside the fabric doll's neck?


Certainly a possibility . . . or we could assume that there were a certin percentage of 19 century rag dolls with floppy necks.  Esther's floppy neck is like a patina that shows a well loved and used plaything.  (Er  . . . that's my story and I'm sticking to it.  Grin )
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Heidi Hollister
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« Reply #12 on: March 20, 2013, 12:19:33 AM »

I found recently a fictional, but very realistic account of a birthday party (As opposed to the ones where the near perfect child decides to reject receiving presents or a party in favor of giving money to the missionaries to help the poor heathen children with no shoes) in which a 1 year old child receives a doll from her grandma nearly as big as herself, which was stuffed with rags so it could be thrown about without injury.

(The book is called "The Birthday Party" if you are interested, it's on Google books, it is a later date, 1869, but I doubt home doll manufacturing techniques had changed THAT much in 10 years.)
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Mary Gutzke
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« Reply #13 on: March 20, 2013, 10:14:38 AM »

Heidi, I love your comparison!

Kind of a highjack here, sorry. Obviously dolls have been a quintessential girl's toy. Was there ever an age where it was acceptable for a little boy to play with them? I'm just wondering if it would be ok for my just over 2-year-old boys to have a little dolly for quiet play during a period church service. I didn't come across any references in period sources, nor of a suitable quiet toy for a small child instead of a doll. Maybe it was a case of "sit there and be quiet!"
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Mary Gutzke
Elaine Robeck
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« Reply #14 on: March 20, 2013, 03:09:24 PM »

I don't know if it was appropriate or not, but my son had a rolled doll.  His sister had one and he couldn't bear to be left out.  Other options for church might be a hankerchief or a few large buttons on a string.  We've also bought several wooden animals from Michaels (craft store) for about $2.50 each.  They are about 6 inches and they have horses, cows, pigs and (my kid's favorite) goats.
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Mary Gutzke
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« Reply #15 on: March 25, 2013, 05:15:35 PM »

Thanks for the ideas, Elaine. I'll probably end up making simple dolls for them. Something quiet that won't make noise when it gets thrown or tossed (which I'm sure it will!). I'll have to check out the animals though!
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Mary Gutzke
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« Reply #16 on: June 24, 2013, 10:20:19 AM »

Mary, I cannot find it now, but I have seen a manufactured boy doll of the period dressed like a Union soldier. I remember him having a similar face shape to female china dolls, but with a mustache! If you don't want to make them girl dolls, perhaps you could make them boys (like them), men (like dad), or soldiers.

Here are some near-period and post-war examples:

http://www.rubylane.com/item/453812-LD-266/CUTE-Antique-China-Head-Boy

http://www.rubylane.com/item/829245-1042/Ormolu-Doll-House-Picture

http://www.rubylane.com/item/157744-TO1816/6-1-4-Antique-German

http://www.rubylane.com/item/527624-D160/Early-Steiff-German-Soldier-Character

http://www.rubylane.com/item/813290-CS-002415/Effanbee-Baby-Grumpy-Military-Costume
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Liana W.
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« Reply #17 on: June 25, 2013, 07:42:04 AM »

...snip...
Here are some near-period and post-war examples:
...snip...
http://www.rubylane.com/item/157744-TO1816/6-1-4-Antique-German

SQUEE! Oh, he is adorable! And the leatherworker side of me is totally geeking out about his belt! (and I think his boots may be leather, too).

Ahem. Excuse me.   Grin
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Liana W.
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« Reply #18 on: June 25, 2013, 07:45:03 AM »

Oh good grief! I was so overwhelmed by the cute I kept the wrong link.   Roll Eyes  I mean this one:

http://www.rubylane.com/item/527624-D160/Early-Steiff-German-Soldier-Character

Not that the one with the bisque head isn't really neat, but he isn't pushing my "squee" buttons.   Cheesy
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EKorsmo
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« Reply #19 on: September 03, 2014, 12:33:15 AM »

It's been awhile, but in case anyone is using the search function for doll pics:

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