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Mother Dean
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« on: May 23, 2012, 11:58:26 AM »

I am gathering my cast iron pots, skillets and bakeware and am wondering about these pots with wooden handles. Does anyone have any research to say that they are period? I am leaning toward No, but would love to have smaller, sauce pans.



Also, I would love to have comments on the bakeware. Did they have these types of muffin and cake pans in cast iron?

If anyone would have a link to a museum collection I would be very grateful. I think that I have exhausted google books in researching this.... although new search terms never hurt. Smiley

One last question on this (for now). How do you transport your cookware to events? We don't camp with military so crates wouldn't work for us. Whatever we use to transport them in should be usable, at least as a prop.

Thanks so much, I look forward to hearing your comments and suggestions.
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Elaine Kessinger
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« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2012, 02:38:11 PM »

Miss Beecher's Domestic Receipt Book includes diagrams of copper and tin sauce pans in period. Beginning page 264, figure 29.

http://digital.lib.msu.edu/projects/cookbooks/html/books/book_18.cfm



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Mother Dean
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« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2012, 05:44:35 PM »

Oh, Elaine, you are my new best friend..... another book/research tool..... and it's not even my birthday!!!! Smiley

Can you tell I am a research junky? Off to explore books that I didn't know were there. Smiley
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Sue Leurgans
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« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2012, 03:35:13 PM »

All my research on pots and pans, leads to saucepans of tinned copper  for sauces or "bell metal" (brass) for preserves.  So far I have not found wooden handles on pots or pans.
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Sue Leurgans
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Jessamyn
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« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2012, 05:10:44 PM »

Apparently there were some pots or pans with wooden handles. Here's a reference in An elementary course of natural and experimental philosophy from 1855, under "Good and Bad Conductors":

"Exp. 2. Touch the metal portion of the handle of an Italian iron, ? it will feel hot; touch the wooden portion of the handle, and it will feel comparatively cool; thereby showing that iron is a much better conductor of heat than wood.

"Compare the heat of the handle of a saucepan having a metal handle, with the heat of the wooden handle of another saucepan."

Similarly, The Child's Book of Nature, 1857, shows that metal teapots regularly had wooden handles:

"The handle of a metallic tea-pot is, you know, made of wood; for, if it was metallic, the heat from the tea would spread through it, and make it so hot that it could not be held in the hand."

Unfortunately, as to what metal these were, or what they looked like, I have nothing!
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Sue Leurgans
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« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2012, 08:12:11 PM »

Good to know there were some teapots with wooden handles.  Interesting.
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Sue Leurgans
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Mother Dean
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« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2012, 08:28:49 PM »


"Compare the heat of the handle of a saucepan having a metal handle, with the heat of the wooden handle of another saucepan."


Thank you Jessamyn. I had found the other references but not this one. I don't know how I missed it.
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Kevin Bender
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« Reply #7 on: December 02, 2012, 06:45:00 PM »

Greetings Everyone,

As to transporting cookware to events:  wooden goods boxes were very common to the period and used for a variety of products.  While I have not personally researched it, others have cited such boxes being available for purchase from local merchants for reuse by the buyer.  I've found a few wooden boxes, assembled in a period manner, are most handy for getting most anything to and from events.  Just don't place any markings on your boxes that indicate the original contents were destined to become military property.

Take Care,
Kevin

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Kevin Bender
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Julie
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« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2013, 04:08:29 PM »

I know this question is old, but I have a cast iron with a wood handle. We use our irons at home and in camp. If you are comfortable with the wood but not the way it looks, bake in it a few times. Ours is as black as the pan from making cornbread.
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