Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Can't find religious statistics  (Read 2401 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Joanna Jones
Guest
« on: March 05, 2012, 12:23:26 PM »

Please oh please can some one point me in the right direction.  I have been sitting at the computer for the last 4 1/2 hours searching for any sources that would show percentages of different religious denominations during different points in American history - I would settle for just the Revolution and the CW eras - to compare the increase or decline of different denominations.  I am specifically researching Quakers.

I have entered every search term I can think of, and searched every religious data base I can find but they all are either narratives about the churches in history, or are statistics from the 20th century.

Can anyone help?

Thanks,

Joanna
Logged
Ms. Jean
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1854


« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2012, 05:38:12 PM »


Have you tried the denominations themselves?  I hope that the PC(USA) could tell you how many members there were at different times.  Now, denominations change & the Civil War did split many denominations.  Some info here:

http://history.pcusa.org/

The archives of a denomination's colleges or seminaries -- Macalester College is in your neighborhood -- could point you in the right direction.  Central Methodist University in Fayette, Missouri has great archives of Methodists in the Midwest.

My ancestors in Iowa were Quakers, farming & tavern keeping.  Named their youngest son Frederick Douglas Weaver....

Ethnicity & faith are related.  More Irish & Italian immigrants were Catholic, more Germans & Scandinavians were Lutheran.  Looking at waves of immigration might help.

Best wishes in your search!

Jean
Route 66
Logged

Ms. Jean
Route 66
Beth Chamberlain
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1255



WWW
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2012, 06:38:20 PM »

Since the census didn't record religion I don't know that there will be a truly reliable enumeration. The census did record churches and church property values though. The University of Virgina has a cool census database that will give you nice graphics for regional distribution, http://mapserver.lib.virginia.edu/index.html.

Many denominations published annual reports, some including membership information. I haven't looked for this sort of thing for a while but I do know that google books  has quite a few of these reports for various Protestant sects in the northeast.

Have you checked your public library for secondary sources which might have already compiled this? A Documentary History of Religion in America might have some numbers.

Beth
Logged

Men are made in the image of God. Gentlemen are manufactured by tailors,  barbers, and bootblacks. Woman is the last and most perfect work of God. Ladies are the productions of silk-worms, milliners
Spinninglisa
Guest
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2012, 11:24:43 PM »

I know this is in the UK, but Friends House, Euston Rd London might be able to help. I am pretty certain they hold archives that cover Friend's Meetings worldwide back to the start in the 1650's.
Hope that helps!
Regards Miss Lisa
Logged
Chip
Dedicated Scribbler
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 330



« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2012, 09:11:39 AM »

Try this link for 1862 statistics:

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/g/genpub/ahj1534.0001.001/664?page=root;rgn=full+text;size=100;view=image

Pages 660 and 661

Logged
mmescher
Dedicated Scribbler
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 329


« Reply #5 on: March 10, 2012, 10:06:15 AM »

I can't speak for the other censuses but, in our summary of the 1860 census there is data on religions.  We use the bound summaries that, in the four volumes, are about 6-8 inches of material.  A university might have copies.

Michael Mescher
Logged
Joanna Jones
Guest
« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2012, 03:45:41 PM »

Thanks all - sorry it took a while for me to get back.

Chip - that is exactly what I was hoping for.  THANK YOU.  I hope to find the same kind of comparison for the colonial/revolutionary period (so many references list the biggest churces - they must have gotten their statistics from somewhere!)

The local library is my next stop - and my last.  There is not time in my day to contact or visit any of the other references mentioned, but thank you to those who suggested them. I was so sure the internet, and specifically Google books, would have the information somewhere!

Joanna the part-time researcher
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines