Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Hair for rolled doll  (Read 7133 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Elaine Robeck
Guest
« on: September 10, 2011, 06:44:34 PM »

I made my daughter a rolled linen doll and it turned out great.  However, my daughter now insists that the doll needs hair.  What kinds of "hair" can I give this poor bald dollbaby?  Paint? yarn?  Any other ideas?

Thanks so much,

Elaine
Logged
mmescher
Dedicated Scribbler
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 329


« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2011, 08:01:25 AM »

The original instructions didn't have any comments about adding hair.  Of the original dolls I've seen, none of them had hair.  About the only modification that I've seen is for someone to draw two dot eyes and a smile on the head portion to approximate a face. 

Whether telling her that period dolls of that type didn't have hair will suffice, I don't know your daughter and how dedicated she is to historic accuracy.  If she still wants hair, you could get her involved and see what she thinks would work for hair.  My first thought is yarn stitched where the center part would fall and then she would have a center part.

Michael Mescher
Logged
tresmomma
Guest
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2011, 03:37:02 PM »

Make her a bonnet, then she can pretend she has hair that's under the bonnet.  Grin

At the Ragged Soldier they have a picture of originals, and a couple look like they have painted hair. Here's the link:

http://www.raggedsoldier.com/documentation/rolled_fabric_doll.pdf
« Last Edit: September 16, 2011, 03:39:25 PM by LauraL » Logged
mmescher
Dedicated Scribbler
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 329


« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2011, 06:30:06 PM »

Laura,

Thanks for reminding me about the Mordecai picture.  It has been a while since we saw the dolls and I didn't remember the hair.  I'll have to look in the filing cabinet and see if I can find the pictures we took of each doll. 

Just to put in a plug for you never know what you'll get if you don't ask, our experience there was a great example.  When we first saw the collection, they were in a glass case.  We wrote to them later to ask if we could photograph the dolls.  They agreed and we made an appointment.  When we arrived, they not only let us take all the pictures we wanted but, as important, allowed us to remove the glass case so that we didn't have to worry about glare from glass.  The staff were wonderful! 

Michael Mescher
Logged
Elaine Robeck
Guest
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2011, 11:50:52 AM »

Mmmmm . . . it seems as though we may have a few options.  I had forgotten about that picture too.  Some of the doll do seem to have painted hair don't they?  Mr. Mescher, if you ever have time,  confirmation of that would be great. 

The WI historical Society does have one that has a lace bonnet:
http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/museum/collections/online/image.cfm?ImageFile=/VoyagerImages/Z001/Z00113/Z0011314.jpg&TableKey=OBJECT:261195

It didn't fly with my daughter, but may help someone else.  The doll has a painted face too.
Logged
mmescher
Dedicated Scribbler
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 329


« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2011, 09:21:53 AM »

Painting hair would not be unheard of.  As was pointed out, some of the rolled dolls in the photograph looked like they had painted hair.  In The American Girl's Book, their directions for a jointed linen doll call for painted on hair and facial features.  But on that, the engraving that comes with the instructions shows a higher artistic skill in painting.

Of course, there are always paper dolls!

Michael Mescher
Logged
vmescher
Senior Research
Veteran Scribbler
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 703


« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2011, 11:29:15 AM »

I checked the original rolled fabric dolls we have and one has a face and the other one does not.  Neither one has hair. 

Of course they are just two dolls among the many others that were made.  I guess a great deal depends upon the preference, skill, and supplies of the doll maker.  A mother may have spent more time on her daughter's doll and would have had more skill so the doll may have been more detailed than if a child made one out of scraps.
Logged

Virginia Mescher
Please Visit us at
Ragged Soldier Sutlery or Vintage Volumes at
www.raggedsoldier.com
Elaine Robeck
Guest
« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2011, 01:39:15 PM »

Thanks everyone! 
Logged
Elaine M
Frequent Scribbler
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 149



« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2011, 05:20:27 PM »

I have read of several dolls with inked on hair.  I have no idea if they were rolled or sewn and of course I can't find my references right now.

Elaine Masciale
Logged
vmescher
Senior Research
Veteran Scribbler
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 703


« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2011, 12:31:34 PM »

I have read of several dolls with inked on hair.  I have no idea if they were rolled or sewn and of course I can't find my references right now.

Elaine Masciale

Elaine,

I expect that the inked hair was drawn on rag dolls rather than the rolled fabric dolls.  It would be difficult to draw or ink hair on the top of the head as it is rolled like a jelly roll. 

I think that my husband, Mike, mentioned the original roll fabric dolls that we saw and some had hair that was sewn on.  the hair could be made of thread, fabric that was cut into strips, or any other similar product that was available.  The drawing of the doll, pictured on our website, had no hair. 

Logged

Virginia Mescher
Please Visit us at
Ragged Soldier Sutlery or Vintage Volumes at
www.raggedsoldier.com
Elaine M
Frequent Scribbler
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 149



« Reply #10 on: December 04, 2011, 10:05:55 PM »

Virgina,
that would make a lot of sense!  Of course it would be harder on a rolled doll!  Thanks!

Elaime
Logged
Elaine Robeck
Guest
« Reply #11 on: January 04, 2012, 01:31:12 PM »

I just painted the hair on my daughter's doll.  I can confirm that painting the hair would have bee easier on a rag doll, but it wasn't hard or anything.  Then we had THIS conversation:

Daughter:  Ohh, Mommy, what can we name her?
Me:  Umm what about Esther?
Daughter:  Yes Esther.  that's pretty.
7 year old son:  You mean like Polly Esther?

Sigh.

Logged
Eileen Hook
Veteran Scribbler
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 666


Mrs. Talbott


WWW
« Reply #12 on: January 05, 2012, 05:57:15 PM »

that boy is a keeper! Grin
Logged

Eileen
Proprietor, Talbott & Co. Heritage Goods
www. talbottandco.etsy.com

Donna Rowan
Guest
« Reply #13 on: January 05, 2012, 06:48:07 PM »

And just remember children no Polly's or Esther's died in the making of this doll... Whats even cuter is I know a little girl named Mary Esther,as Polly is usually a nickname for Mary,when she gets a bit bigger we'll have to tease a bit[gentely, she's a sweet lilttle girl Grin].
Logged
lkfend
Guest
« Reply #14 on: March 13, 2013, 10:33:41 AM »

Michael...
What doll collection did you get to photograph and what is the link to see the pictures? Thank you!
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines