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Author Topic: cold tea not iced tea  (Read 2887 times)
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Stephanie Brennan
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« on: August 16, 2011, 06:54:09 PM »

A period recipe for cold tea -  sounds sweet.   Look for tea syrup.       Stephanie
http://books.google.com/books?id=WRDZAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA490&dq=chocolate+cake+with+cream&hl=en&ei=eRxLTt6CPOnUiAK9uZSWAQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CFEQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=chocolate%20cake%20with%20cream&f=false

The recipe calls for 2 pounds sugar approx 4.5 cups
« Last Edit: August 16, 2011, 07:24:46 PM by Stephanie Brennan » Logged
Joanna Jones
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« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2011, 07:49:07 PM »

I just did a quick search out of curiosity on iced tea, and the general consensus is that the earliest mention of tea served cold and sweet (and not mixed with spirits) was at a vet's meeting in about 1890.  I think you just blew that info out of the water!

I need to try that receipt!
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hanktrent
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« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2011, 08:10:04 PM »


Is that the right link? I didn't see anything like it in the recipes on that page and the next, and searched for "cold tea" in the magazine with no hits.  Huh

Never mind, just saw it. Syrup of tea on the next page!

I wonder if it's also supposed to be a kind of instant tea, which can be kept like a lot of syrups, the sugar preserving it, and then mixed with water when needed? Very interesting recipe.

Hank Trent
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« Last Edit: August 16, 2011, 08:19:03 PM by hanktrent » Logged
shawnra
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« Reply #3 on: August 18, 2011, 08:24:35 AM »

I have used this recipe before and it is much easier to have a syrup to add water to then trying to make a tea with loose leaf over and over.
As for iced tea, I always see it referenced with Russians, and by the 1870s it is refered to as tea a la russe.
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BetsyConnolly
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« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2011, 08:50:35 AM »

I've seen a recipe like this used as an instant tea - add hot water, as much as you want, depending on how strong/sweet you like your tea. Works well for crowds - no need to make pot after pot after pot, just keep a boiler of water.
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Betsy Connolly
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Elaine Kessinger
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« Reply #5 on: September 03, 2014, 07:22:10 AM »

From: The New Monthly Magazine, vol. 9, page 231 (circa 1818)

Quote
Dr. Darwin used to recommend cold tea as a grateful drink to febrile patients; the good effect of which, in certain circumstances, I can fully attest.
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vmescher
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« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2014, 03:32:07 PM »

The first reference that I found that mentioned iced tea, in the United States, was in The Ladies' Repository, Jan. 1852, "Paragraphs on Ice," An immense quantity of ice is consumed in Russian housekeeping.  Throughout the summer, ices are sold in the streets . . .  even iced tea is drank in immense quantities."  I also found a reference to iced tea, in 1854, for medicinal use.  I found the following in Saturday Evening Post, Feb. 14, 1857, "Tea as a Summer Drink,"  "tea made strong . . . well sweetened, with good milk or better cream in it in sufficient quantity to give it a dark yellow color, and the whole mixture cooled in an ice-chest to the temperature of ice, is 'the most delicious, the most soothing, the  most allaying drink' we have ever treated ourselves or friends to.  We know of nothing to compare it for deliciousness or refreshment. . .  The beverage only needs to be known to be popular."  I found the tea syrup in Southern Planter[/I, July 1857, Lady's Home Companion, Feb, 1858.  ]The first published recipe, specifically for culinary iced tea, appeared in the August 8, 1868 issue of Harper?s Bazaar and the first recipe, in a cookbook, was in Housekeeping in Old Virginia (1879).  After then, recipes started to appear regularly and the beverage is mentioned frequently in magazine and newspaper articles.
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Virginia Mescher
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