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Author Topic: No cook event food  (Read 10404 times)
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #20 on: July 02, 2011, 05:36:27 PM »

Snork... Hank, that's funny! (I'm just not a big lettuce fan, that's why I'd skip it. If it'll live in the garden, it'll certainly live in a basin for a few days... think "cut flowers", right?)

Thanks for sharing those additional tips about google searching... that should be really helpful for Kendle to go poking about! Warning, Kendle: once you get a few period recipes under your belt, you may find yourself addicted. It's a lot of fun to try the food, and a good amount of common sense when reading the original recipes will see you through. We're also available to help translate period things into modern translation, without unnecessary modern substitutions. (I've read "historic" recipes that use margarine, for instance... a foodstuff not available in the period, but considered by the modern cookbook writer to be "better" than the original butter or lard or dripping.)
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #21 on: July 03, 2011, 07:47:39 AM »

There are two additional things I would like to take to an event with me next weekend. They both happen to be mentioned in this thread. (thank you Heidi)
How would you store hard-boiled eggs and baked beans (meatless)?

For the eggs, I was thinking a quart to two quart crock filled with cold water or ice.
For the beans, I thought a bean pot.

Then challenge is I was only able to find smaller crocks in storage. I don't know what happened to the bean pot I gave Dad. I don't know if I can borrow any of mom's which are original.

We will be arriving on Thursday to set up the store for my husband's grandma. I'll be moving all my stuff to the house on Friday for the weekend. Oh, these will be store-bought eggs since I don't know when I'll get to my sis-in-law's for their eggs.

Thank you for any suggestions.
(realizing as I type that I will need to mark my dishes now.)
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Anna Worden Bauersmith
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Heidi Hollister
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« Reply #22 on: July 27, 2015, 01:37:30 PM »

I was just looking at this old thread for some ideas and Hank's lettuce story reminded me of a period recipe I tried.  It was lettuce soup.  Yes.  Lettuce soup.  Boiled lettuce.  It was surprisingly good!  A girl I was teaching selected it, or I would have never had the guts to try it.
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MaryDee
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« Reply #23 on: July 27, 2015, 07:40:35 PM »

These are all great ideas, as much for 2015 as for the date they were posted!

One thing not yet mentioned--an old Pennsylvania Dutch dish that invariably shows up at potlucks in that region (along with pepper cabbage which I never did learn how to make):   Both, I was told, go back to early colonial days.  

Picked beets and hardboiled eggs:   Get several jars of pickled beets, or make your own.  Hardboil eggs and remove shells.   Put the pickled beets (including juice) and whole shelled eggs in a crock or bowl, stir gently to distribute the brine, making sure the eggs are complely immersed.  Let stand several days to a week.  The eggs turn a beautiful purple color--almost too pretty to eat-- and they taste really good with the beets.  I always refrigerated them while this process was going on, but after the pickling brine has soaked through the eggs, the pickles should do fine for several days without refrigeration, if kept in the shade.  

And then there's old-fashioned "refrigeration"--wrap items loosely in wet towels and let evaporation keep them cool.  Be sure to keep wetting the towels when they dry out.  I suspect this cooling method may not work so well in the 95+% humidity back east, but it works fine in the west!   Of course, keep everything in the shade!  Things won't be cold, but they will at least stay nice and  cool!  I remember my mother's being able to  cool down fresh milk and keep it for 2-3 days this way.  

BTW, does anyone have an authentic Pennsylvania Dutch recipe for pepper cabbage?   The ladies I met there who made it all said they just sort of threw the ingredients together, but I never could duplicate the taste.  
« Last Edit: July 27, 2015, 08:09:58 PM by MaryDee » Logged
MaryDee
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« Reply #24 on: August 25, 2015, 03:06:13 PM »

It looks as though this thread will be useful for the Labor Day reenactment in Oregon, since Oregon State Parks have banned all fires--only propane-type stoves are allowed.  Unfortunately, I can't go, but I'm emailing the URL of this thread to the president of my group. 

Of course, with our awful wildfires, we're all hoping for a big rain, all over the Northwest, but at this time of year it's unlikely. 
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EKorsmo
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« Reply #25 on: August 26, 2015, 08:10:27 PM »

I know what you mean.  Nisqually's brigade was candle-free, though we were able to do some cooking over our one, small, carefully monitored cook-fire (with fire department supervision).  Rain dance, anyone?
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