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Heidi Hollister
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« on: June 30, 2011, 11:17:41 AM »

Ok...  I've had my brain so much on the idea of going to an event this weekend with the twins that I forgot to actually plan the eating part of this thing.  I was thinking, "We'll just eat a REALLY big meal before we leave..."  But my husband doesn't seem to agree and neither do the twins... so I'm outvoted 3 to 1.  We're not likely to have access to fire or a stove or if we do it'll be limited.

I need some no cook ideas.  So far I can think up these ones:

Boiled eggs
bread
nuts
fruits (dried and otherwise)
butter

My poor baby fried brain sort of ends there.  Any more suggestions?
« Last Edit: June 30, 2011, 11:23:38 AM by Heidi Hollister » Logged

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Ms. Jean
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« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2011, 11:41:53 AM »


Hopefully our own home-visiting baby nurse Joanna will read your question....

I know that you will need lots and lots and lots of water if you are nursing those babies!  Please take water from home to avoid any surprises, please.

Hard cheese travels well.

Have you asked any of the people who offered "oh, any help you need" after the babies arrived???

Best wishes to the four of you!

Jean
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hanktrent
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« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2011, 12:00:22 PM »

All kinds of baked goods besides bread--cakes, cookies, cold fritters, johnny cakes, the bread-like kind of period puddings, adapted to the time and place you're portraying, for example johnny cakes for the poor, cookies made with white sugar and butter for the better off.

Vegetables in season that don't require cooking. It's a little early for a lot in the north; would it be time for tomatoes and cucumbers in the deep south? A salad would do in the north, though--lettuce, onions, spinach, etc. The richer or less war-torn, the earlier you might have things that were started in frames. Again, not suitable for every portrayal, but great for someone at home with access to a garden.

Jams, jellies. Canned fruit. Cold canned tomatoes, if you like them.

Canned milk, molasses or white or brown sugar or fruit syrups for a sauce. Again, depending on the historic situation.

Hank Trent
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mr.darcy1
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« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2011, 12:01:07 PM »

Sea Voyage Gingerbread cookies http://books.google.com/books?id=-PspAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q=sea%20voyage&f=false and jam are staples in my no-cook repertoire. 
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Chandra Miller

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Elaine Robeck
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« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2011, 12:08:04 PM »

pre-baked muffins, scones biscuts
various pickles
jam
pie, cookies, pound cakes
heating up a previously cooked soup or stew
cheese
slaw- the Buckeye Cook book (1877, but . . . ) has one that is dressed with oil and vinegar instead of  mayo.  
cold ham or chicken (I seem to remember you are vegetarian? but I don't know about you DH)

This is pretty standard for our family.  I almost never cook.  We have 4 young children, one with special needs so cooking is pretty low on my fun things to do at an event list.

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BarbaraSmith
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« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2011, 12:33:35 PM »

WM is within driving distance of town, so don't stress. I like your list, Heidi. Anything else you're going to need, you just send Hubby to town for.  Cheesy

BTW, I discovered that if you go over to one of the unused camping locations within the park, the bathrooms will be unlocked, and you can wash up in the sinks there in privacy. It was a life saver for me, because I just got so hot and frustrated at one point.

Then I drove in and got something from Taco Bell.  Cheesy

Huggers,
B.
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Paula
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« Reply #6 on: June 30, 2011, 12:46:44 PM »

Swing by on your way down and I can have two loaves of wheat bread ready.  I can bake them tonight.  Just let me know.
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Joanna Jones
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« Reply #7 on: June 30, 2011, 12:47:46 PM »

I may be a home visiting nurse, but why do you think I can add anything abut food???  Grin  The only connection I have between the two is trying to fend off well-meaning grandmothers from other cultures who want to stuff me full at a visit with strange foods, and keep me there all afternoon.   Shocked

(I'm playing around with font size as I'm finding I'm having trouble seeing the smaller stuff recently!)
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Elisabeth M
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« Reply #8 on: June 30, 2011, 01:03:25 PM »

Joanna, try using CTRL+ in your browser - It should make everything bigger!


....and that's all I have to contribute to this conversation. No cook camping food for my family is homemade refried beans and homemade tortillas! Not quiiiiite reenacting appropriate.
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Heidi Hollister
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« Reply #9 on: June 30, 2011, 01:37:21 PM »

We are vegetarian and can't do dairy, but I'm sure for others who will have the same question in the future who are not non-dairy vegetarians, all suggestions would  be welcome.
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Heidi Hollister
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« Reply #10 on: June 30, 2011, 01:44:50 PM »

And Paula, I'm sure we could arrange to stop by your house on the way out if there's bread involved.  Wink 
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Marta Vincent
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« Reply #11 on: June 30, 2011, 06:14:23 PM »

Hermits are a period correct cookie that travels/keeps well. Not too sweet and chock full of nuts, raisins & dates.  Tucked away out of sight, but available if you need them you can take granola bars (or make period correct 'flapjacks'), If you can hide a cooler there's other options as well: soy yogurt & cheese if you eat that.
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Heidi Hollister
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« Reply #12 on: June 30, 2011, 06:25:42 PM »

Marta, do you have a recipe for Hermits?
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Ginny Hardcastle
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« Reply #13 on: June 30, 2011, 10:14:48 PM »

Chandra, the recipe for Sea Voyage Gingerbread looks interesting.  (No rolling pin involved.  Always a plus for me!)  Could you give some suggestions to take the trial and error out of baking the gingerbread?  The directions call for a full tea cup of powdered ginger.  That seems like a lot.  How much ginger do you use when making the recipe?  What temperature do you use for a brisk fire?  About how long do you leave it in the oven?

Thanks.

Ginny
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Elaine Kessinger
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« Reply #14 on: July 01, 2011, 07:07:13 AM »

Beans and/or peas could be made into salads, soup, "baked beans" (which can be made all veggie)
Potatoes can be made ahead and made into salads, soup, "chips", or even just baked
Eggs can be made into dishes that travel well
Veggie Sandwich is always a possibility

As you already said... fruits, nuts, veggies, baked goods for snacks.

Soups would need to be at least heated up... but perhaps someone with a fire would watch your pot along with theirs if it were all prepared and all they had to do was stir occasionally.

...humm... maybe it's time to start another thread on period vegetarian and vegan recipes, some of which would be event-suitable.
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Kendle L.
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« Reply #15 on: July 01, 2011, 03:28:53 PM »

All kinds of baked goods besides bread--cakes, cookies, cold fritters, johnny cakes, the bread-like kind of period puddings, adapted to the time and place you're portraying, for example johnny cakes for the poor, cookies made with white sugar and butter for the better off.

Vegetables in season that don't require cooking. It's a little early for a lot in the north; would it be time for tomatoes and cucumbers in the deep south? A salad would do in the north, though--lettuce, onions, spinach, etc. The richer or less war-torn, the earlier you might have things that were started in frames. Again, not suitable for every portrayal, but great for someone at home with access to a garden.


My family isn't vegetarian, but we are super health conscious, and don't make a habit of bread/baked things. All my brother & I usually bring to an all-day event is ginger cookies or tea cakes to share, a jar of pickles, and apples. Sometimes there is stew. A salad sounds good, or some cooked vegetable dish, but I have no clue of what to transport it in to keep it cold. I hate bringing dishes that aren't period correct, but can't find many PC receipts that are written in modern day transcript.
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hanktrent
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« Reply #16 on: July 01, 2011, 04:24:25 PM »

I hate bringing dishes that aren't period correct, but can't find many PC receipts that are written in modern day transcript.

I've found the simplest solution, in the long run, is to learn to follow period recipes as written. After all, it's what the person you're portraying would have been able to do (typically), so it not only widens one's choices, it adds to one's persona as well. Once you gets used to it, you can follow anything in any period cookbook. Also, it avoids the common problem that modern transcripts often don't just explain recipes, they change recipes.

What kinds of things trip you up, in period recipes? What's an example of one that you'd like to make, but the instructions aren't clear? Maybe we could help.

Hank Trent
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Kendle L.
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« Reply #17 on: July 01, 2011, 05:59:26 PM »

First off, I don't know where to find pc recipes, but I just joined a group on Yahoo groups (19th Century Foods) that might help me a little. I know there are some on Google books too but I seem to have lost my bookmarks for them & a few other websites after my mom's computer crashed.

I don't have any receipts in mind right now but do remember a few being very confusing I had been thinking about. I just want something healthy that won't need refrigeration at an event but is still PC for 1855 and appropriate for what produce is in season right now in Missouri. It's hard to tell which receipts can stand no refrigeration. 

How would you keep lettuce, tomato and cucumber salad cold? Or does it need refrigeration?   
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #18 on: July 01, 2011, 10:36:07 PM »

I'd skip the lettuce and just have the cukes and maters, and not worry about refrigeration. Smiley

Kendle, take a peek at the vegetarian thread... great suggestions for searching google books and such there.
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #19 on: July 02, 2011, 03:15:29 AM »

First off, I don't know where to find pc recipes, but I just joined a group on Yahoo groups (19th Century Foods) that might help me a little. I know there are some on Google books too but I seem to have lost my bookmarks for them & a few other websites after my mom's computer crashed.

Oh, okay, if you just need links to period recipes, try searching on google books for search strings like:

http://www.google.com/search?tbo=p&tbm=bks&q=intitle:receipt&tbs=,bkv:p,cdr:1,cd_min:Jan%201_2%201845,cd_max:Dec%2031_2%201865&num=10

Change the word "receipt" when it appears in the search bar as intitle:receipt to intitle:housewife or "cookery," "cookbook," "receipts," "recipes" for lots more.

Quote
I don't have any receipts in mind right now but do remember a few being very confusing I had been thinking about. I just want something healthy that won't need refrigeration at an event but is still PC for 1855 and appropriate for what produce is in season right now in Missouri. It's hard to tell which receipts can stand no refrigeration. 

How would you keep lettuce, tomato and cucumber salad cold? Or does it need refrigeration?   

Think about the ingredients, rather than the recipes. If the separate ingredients keep, the recipe will too, generally speaking. So for example, look at all the aisles in the grocery where things aren't refrigerated and aren't canned or bottled or sealed. That means all the produce, everything in the baking aisle, and the dried things. Butter will keep for a short while unrefrigerated but will melt in the heat, but lard is just sitting there in a box on the shelf in the grocery, and it stands up to the heat well.

Baked goods are kept out on the shelf too, which inspires the idea that it's easier to make things requiring eggs and milk ahead of time and bring them. Fresh eggs and milk will keep a short while in the heat--I think there was just a discussion here recently about eggs--but the eggs generally should be farm-fresh unwashed, which aren't always available, and kept fairly cool, like in a cellar. Same for milk--needs to be unpasteurized or inoculated with good bacteria and will keep in a coolish place for a day or so, but may be more trouble than it's worth. There's also canned milk, depending on the historic situation, and there are period labels to add to modern cans. The modern cans aren't quite right, but there's really no practical way to can milk in period cans. Don't know how common canned milk would be in 1855 though--never researched it that early.

Meat is trickier, since most modern products are just for taste and aren't really processed for preservation any more. If you can find "country ham" or "slab bacon," salted and smoked the old fashioned way, that'll keep in the heat, but is very salty, so needs parboiled to get the salt out before final cooking. Some people order it from places like Scott Hams, but some southern groceries or butcher shops carry it. I've never seen commercial salt pork or pickled beef done the old fashioned way, but if you get into this more, it's something you can make at home in the refrigerator a few weeks ahead of time. It's also more practical, since you can just make up a pound or two if necessary, and not need to buy a whole ham or slab or half-slab of bacon.

Quote from: Elizabeth
I'd skip the lettuce and just have the cukes and maters, and not worry about refrigeration

The lettuce could also be kept fresh separately soaking in water, and combined with the cukes and maters when the time comes. If it's very hot, just slice everything and assemble it at the last minute.

Don't make me tell the lettuce story.  Grin At Westville, Georgia, we were given our food for the boarding house at the start of the event which somehow we thought was going to include collards (maybe somebody said so? I dunno). So we were sorting through all these bags and boxes of stuff, I saw something that looked like a head of collards, stuck it stem-down in a big kettle of water so just the top of the head was showing, and forgot about it. Visitors came through; one local lady spontaneously commented on the collards. A day or two passed, came time to boil the collards.

I pulled them out, and one of the other cooks said, "That's lettuce!" I looked. It sure looked like lettuce. But-- But--it had to be collards. A nice local Georgia black lady had even said so, and that's the ultimate expert! We all stared at it, felt it, argued about it. It was either very delicate collards, or was indeed lettuce. So the menu changed from ham and collard greens to ham and salad. I'm sure glad I didn't just throw it in the pot and boil it up--no idea how boiled lettuce would turn out!

But anyway, there's evidence that loose-head lettuce, in the head at least, will keep fresh for several warm days in water.

Hank Trent
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