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Author Topic: I want to make a baldric  (Read 2248 times)
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Mary Warren
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« on: May 13, 2007, 09:40:31 AM »

I would like to make some baldrics (aka Miss America sashes) for a flag presentation at an upcoming event.  Any one have a clue as to how to make them?  I'm guessing they need to have some sort of diagonal seam at the shoulder to get them to drape nicely, but other than that I'm at a loss.  Help!

Mary

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Mary Warren

A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have.?  ?  ?  Thomas Jefferson
Nona Nelson
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« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2007, 01:35:35 PM »

me and one of my friends made baldrics (sashes) one year to wear on the 4th of July.  Here is what we did to make them:

Cut bias strips of red, white and blue (we accually used pre made bias tape, one inch wide, ironed flat), cut as long as you like.
Sew the three together, red, white then blue.
Hem all four sides

And that was it! To wear it, you can either tie a not or a bow (if yours is long anougth) or pin it in place.

The last dance that I went to, the theme was Red white and blue, and I went as Caddie Woodlawn in my white sheer dress with my RW&B sash like what Caddie and other girls in her town wore on the 4th or July. Here is what it looks like:



Hope that helps!
« Last Edit: May 13, 2007, 01:37:59 PM by Nona Nelson » Logged
Veronica Carey
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« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2007, 04:54:55 PM »

You could make it like a girl scout merit badge sash, where the seam at the shoulder is actually straight, but the seam at the hip is practically vertical.  Look at the red/white/blue sash above, and imagine a straight up & down seam joining the two sides over the hip--it would be vertical.  (I think merit badge sashes were also cut on the curve, like a crescent moon.)
Veronica
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Nona Nelson
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« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2007, 05:42:02 PM »

He he he, I am a girl scout, and yes, sashes are cut slightly cruved, through, sashes for the older girl scouts (HS aged) are cut straight and tied at the waist. I've never had a sash for my bagges, being they are not very practical for I always got lots and lots of badges, I got almost three vests full of bages.
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Anna Worden Bauersmith
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« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2007, 04:58:59 AM »

Which is the proper word for the mid-century, baldric or sash? Or something else? I tried to look at the online dictionaries, but didn't get the info I wanted.

Anna
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Bill Eiff
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« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2007, 09:16:49 AM »

Which is the proper word for the mid-century, baldric or sash? Or something else? I tried to look at the online dictionaries, but didn't get the info I wanted.

Anna

I do not know what info you wanted, but in my experience every time I have seen a definition of "baldric" it has been refering to a diagonal strap, usually leather, and sometimes very ornate, used as a sword carriage device.

Fabric items similarly constructed have generally been referred to as sashes.

Granted the above usage has been primarily military in nature, YMMV.


Bill Eiff
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Mary Warren
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« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2007, 03:43:12 PM »

I think both terms are correct.  I chose to use baldric because sashes were often tied around the waist and I wanted to be clear that I meant the type that draped over one shoulder.

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Mary Warren

A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have.?  ?  ?  Thomas Jefferson
Tom_Nixon
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« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2007, 02:11:55 AM »

re:
Baldric

Quote
me and one of my friends made baldrics (sashes) one year to wear on the 4th of July.  Here is what we did to make them:

Cut bias strips of red, white and blue (we accually used pre made bias tape, one inch wide, ironed flat), cut as long as you like.
Sew the three together, red, white then blue.
Hem all four sides

And that was it!

"You have a cleaver plan!"

Baldrick from "Blackadder"
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2007, 10:00:11 AM »

Tom, thanks!  My first thoughts on the topic involved turnips.

I think for a patriotic presentation, I'd go with a long, straight sash, and pin or knot it at the hip.  That will be easy to don, has minimal sewing, and looks just lovely.
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Regards,
Elizabeth
Mary Warren
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« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2007, 05:09:40 PM »

Elizabeth,

If I use along straight length of fabric pinned or knotted at the hip will it lay smoothly at the shoulder?  Huh   It seams like it will bunch up.  I'm afraid I'm over analyzing this.   Undecided

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Mary Warren

A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have.?  ?  ?  Thomas Jefferson
BarbaraSmith
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« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2007, 09:36:23 PM »

First, take a large turnip, then....  Grin

Good heavens, I've been holding in the Blackadder jokes all day. I feel like I just passed some very painful gas.  Grin

BTW, Nona dear, you look LOVERLY!

Mary, I'm sure you don't want any short smelly unwashed men draped about you. Do follow Nona's lead and don't pay any attention to those of us with an unhealthy obsession with BBC comedies... Grin

LOL,
B.
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Hilary Isacson
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« Reply #11 on: May 16, 2007, 01:34:25 PM »

For depicting Mary Queen of Scots at a fancy dress ball last year, I wore a straight-cut piece of silk taffeta tartan about three yards long and eight inches wide across one shoulder and tied in a square knot on the opposite hip.  It worked fine, and as long as your fabric isn't too stiff or especially wide, yours should too.

Hilary Isacson
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Tom_Nixon
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« Reply #12 on: May 16, 2007, 02:47:23 PM »

Quote
For depicting Mary Queen of Scots at a fancy dress ball last year, I wore a straight-cut piece of silk taffeta tartan about three yards long and eight inches wide across one shoulder and tied in a square knot on the opposite hip.


Didn't you get cold? Wink
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BarbaraSmith
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« Reply #13 on: May 16, 2007, 04:20:23 PM »

Naaaahhhh... Tom, you know Queen Mary was hardy. No central heating in that drafty old stone pile of hers....  Grin

LOL,
B.
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Auntie B says: "I may look like Aunt Pitty-Pat, but I have the soul of Belle Watling," and "Since I can't be a good example, then I'm just gonna have to be a horrible warning."
Patricia Lynch
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« Reply #14 on: November 06, 2007, 11:47:51 AM »

The ladies in the Harper's Weekly illustration ("Ladies in attendance in regulation costume at the Metropolitan Fair," April 23, 1864) shows sashes knotted or pinned at the shoulder. (See http://www.sonofthesouth.net/leefoundation/civil-war/1864/april/fair.htm) We made some sashes earlier this year from Ben Tart bunting left over from another project. We lined them to put an end to the unraveling, so they're too thick to give it this kind of treatment.

Thought you might enjoy an excerpt from a letter of Em Rosenville of Waupun, written on her visit to the Milwaukee Fair, 1865. The letter surfaced in 2006 and was recently placed in the protection of the Milwaukee VA archives.

July 4th. Opening our eyes, in the early twilight of morning, we see cousin Viola nearly dressed…. we dress quickly, put on rubbers, and elevating balmorals and crinoline to a proper distance from the ground, we are down on the beach, before any one else is stirring.… Mounting a flight of stairs, outside a building on the corner of Wis. & E. Water sts. we have a fine view of the procession, which is a very long one. Among its features, are seven bands of music. The firemen, with their engines wreathed with flowers and evergreens look beautiful… But the crowning feature is the Car of Liberty drawn by four horses. Upon a circular platform, are seated forty or fifty young girls, forming a pyramid, the Goddess of Liberty at the top. These girls are dressed in white with red, white, and blue sashes, and wreathes upon their heads, forming a charming tableau. The streets are thronged with people on foot and in carriages. Every horse, vehicle, and street car is ornamented by the Stars and Stripes, rendering the scene animated beyond description.… A reg’t came in this morning, and their arms are stacked near the Newhall.

As long as I'm mentioned the Fair, can I attach another image? It is an ensemble from the fair: two gentlemen (one on right is prominent Milwaukee music publisher H.M. Hempstead) and three lovely ladies, all married (their maiden names are given in the photo ID).



Patricia Lynch
West Side Soldiers Aid Society, Inc.
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