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Author Topic: When corn husk dolls attack  (Read 6960 times)
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Paula
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« on: February 04, 2011, 05:19:48 PM »

Help!  Can someone tell me why every single 4th grade who is studying pioneer (Oregon History) thinks they have to make corn husk dolls on their Pioneer day? 

Does anyone have a similar but more correct idea that I can suggest/ recommend/ bribe the teachers into using?  I thought of the little rolled fabric dolls but not sure what the boys would think of that "sewing stuff."
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BarbaraSmith
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« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2011, 05:22:32 PM »

Oh, someone put out a curriculum sheet, and they all downloaded it.  Cheesy I get the same thing at Fort Nisqually. Same 4th graders running from building to building asking the same questions.  Roll Eyes

I think you could make a hankerchief doll without any sewing. Just tying. Might appeal to the boys, since you'd need a MEN's hankerchief to do it.  Cheesy

Cheers,
B.
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mmescher
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« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2011, 08:06:06 PM »

Could anyone help with the documentation for a handkerchief doll(s)?

I can tie a man, woman, and twins in a cradle but couldn't find any documentation for them so I stopped doing them.

Michael Mescher
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BarbaraSmith
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« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2011, 11:20:05 PM »

Well, FINE. I tried.  Sad

Sorry Paula! If Michael can't find it, it probably doesn't exist.  Sad
B.
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Auntie B says: "I may look like Aunt Pitty-Pat, but I have the soul of Belle Watling," and "Since I can't be a good example, then I'm just gonna have to be a horrible warning."
Paula
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« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2011, 09:56:52 AM »

No problem, Barb. I appreciate the suggestions.
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hanktrent
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« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2011, 03:52:47 PM »

Could anyone help with the documentation for a handkerchief doll(s)?

I can tie a man, woman, and twins in a cradle but couldn't find any documentation for them so I stopped doing them.

Michael Mescher

It's British, but...

1859 court case, nine-year-old girl is a witness. "The poor little girls' attempt to describe what had occurred on this occasion was for a considerable period not comprehended. The skeleton of a four-post bedstead was subsequently formed with pens, and she clearly demonstrated by the aid of a handkerchief-doll, the position in which the little sufferer had been placed..."

http://books.google.com/books?id=ILZbAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA43 (middle column, about halfway down)

Hank Trent
hanktrent@gmail.com
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mmescher
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« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2011, 07:12:31 PM »

Hank,

That is an interesting quote from that book.  Now it looks like a lead to do further digging to try to find out what a handkerchief doll would look like, maybe how common they were, and the context in which they were used.  Thanks for your extra look and finding it.

Michael Mescher
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Paula
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« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2011, 07:24:59 PM »

Good news everyone I talked the teachers into using muslin and making dolls similar to the rolled fabric ones in The American Girl's Book.  I think they are going to try tying them with string rather than sewing them but I'm counting it as a step in the right direction.
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Heidi Hollister
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« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2011, 10:00:57 PM »

Yeay for Paula!  A small step for history-kind!
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mmescher
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« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2011, 02:01:31 PM »

If you check out my website raggedsoldier.com , one of the items we offer is a rolled fabric doll kit which used the instructions for the rolled fabric doll in _The American Girl's Book_.  Included in the kit is an eight page instruction book.

Michael Mescher
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Jessamyn
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« Reply #10 on: March 13, 2011, 05:11:29 PM »

There are some interesting references to dolls (or rather, doll substitutes) in Miss Leslie's behavior book, 1859:

"We have seen country children perfectly satisfied with a doll that was nothing but a hard ear of Indian corn, arrayed in a coarse towel pinned round it. A little farm-house boy, of three years old, made a pet of a large squash, which he dressed in a pocket-handkerchief, and called Phebe Ann. We heard him say, as he passed his hand over its lumpy neck, 'Poor Phebe Ann! what hives she has!'"
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Paula
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« Reply #11 on: March 13, 2011, 07:52:09 PM »

Those are great quotes!!

 We turned out some cute little muslin dolls this year and the teachers were happy not to have the mess of the corn husk soaking in water.
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Heidi Hollister
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« Reply #12 on: March 13, 2011, 09:06:56 PM »

Yeay Paula!  Where appealing to accuracy fails, appealing to a tidy classroom will succeed!  Good job! 
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NanciG
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« Reply #13 on: April 11, 2011, 01:35:53 PM »


"We have seen country children perfectly satisfied with a doll that was nothing but a hard ear of Indian corn, arrayed in a coarse towel pinned round it. A little farm-house boy, of three years old, made a pet of a large squash, which he dressed in a pocket-handkerchief, and called Phebe Ann. We heard him say, as he passed his hand over its lumpy neck, 'Poor Phebe Ann! what hives she has!'"

I interned at the Illlinois State Museum with their doll collection.  One of the dolls was a mutton bone with a piece of fabric tied arround it.  It looked well used and loved.  Truly an example that toys are what you make them.

Nanci Gasiel
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BarbaraSmith
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« Reply #14 on: April 11, 2011, 01:56:08 PM »

LOL!!!! "Poor Phebe Ann" indeed!!!!!

What sweet stories!!!!!!!!!!
B.
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Auntie B says: "I may look like Aunt Pitty-Pat, but I have the soul of Belle Watling," and "Since I can't be a good example, then I'm just gonna have to be a horrible warning."
Elizabeth
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« Reply #15 on: April 15, 2011, 03:07:08 PM »

So long as it doesn't devolve into the Underground Rail myths, simple four-patch quilt piecing is fun for girls and boys alike, and if sewing is not wanted, making quilt patterns with pasted-down colored paper shapes is both fun AND geometry.
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Regards,
Elizabeth
Paula
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« Reply #16 on: April 15, 2011, 04:00:51 PM »

Thanks Elizabeth for the ideas. We did make quilt patterns using fabric that was pre-cut and they arranged into shapes.  And as for sewing I had the daring to teach them all how to sew a button on to a piece of fabric, using REAL NEEDLES.  Thought the school district safety police would have a heart attack, but the kids loved it, especially the boys.  Several of them came back to sew more buttons.
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #17 on: April 17, 2011, 01:41:50 PM »

I've yet to meet a boy who doesn't enjoy learning to do useful things, sewing included. (One of my brothers does a bit of quilting, one does lovely man-themed embroidery, and my dad will tie quilts out of self-preservation, and to get his dining room back.) I'm glad the school's safety folks didn't freak. LOL
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Regards,
Elizabeth
Bethany K.
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« Reply #18 on: June 02, 2011, 03:45:04 PM »

I looked at the itinerary for the Rose Hill Manor Park 7th annual Civil War Encampment, and what do you think is slated for Saturday at 1:30pm?

http://tinyurl.com/66eqflm
« Last Edit: June 02, 2011, 03:47:02 PM by Bethany K. » Logged
BarbaraSmith
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« Reply #19 on: June 02, 2011, 04:01:17 PM »

I looked at the itinerary for the Rose Hill Manor Park 7th annual Civil War Encampment, and what do you think is slated for Saturday at 1:30pm?

http://tinyurl.com/66eqflm

Gang-Snooding?  Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy

LOL,
B.
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Auntie B says: "I may look like Aunt Pitty-Pat, but I have the soul of Belle Watling," and "Since I can't be a good example, then I'm just gonna have to be a horrible warning."
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