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Author Topic: Rouleau Fork??? used to make trimming  (Read 2118 times)
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Ms. Jean
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« on: June 12, 2010, 05:25:18 AM »

Checking in the R.L. Shep reprint The Ladies Self-instructor in Millinery, Mantua-Making, Embroidery & Applique (1853) I noticed this paragraph in the Berlin work section:

33. ROULEAU EDGING
 
Procure a "Rouleau fork," wind the wool 16 times around, take it off and it by a stitch of wool.  Ends of twine being fixed to a leaden cushion, the bows are placed between them, and are confined in their position by tying the strings.  (page 76)

This sounds like using a hairpin lace (loom, tool, frame, thingy.)  What would a lady do with this Rouleau Edging?  How wide was a Rouleau Fork?  Did Victorian ladies really do this on hairpins???  Could the modern tool be used at home to produce fringe or edging?

Our town was founded in 1857, would the 1853 edging be out-of-date?  How about all of our upcoming 1861 events?

Looking forward to learning more about this.  Making those loooong strips looks like possible car-trip work.

Thanks!

Jean
Route 66

eta: this is a textile fork, not an eating utensil.   Grin
« Last Edit: June 13, 2010, 05:51:24 PM by Ms. Jean » Logged

Ms. Jean
Route 66
Ms. Jean
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« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2010, 04:08:27 AM »


Bump!

Maybe my Google search really did turn up everything?

I also looked at lucet fork instructions, but apparently that makes a cord, not loopy fringe.

What else was a Rouleau Fork called? 

Thanks!

Jean
Route 66
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Ms. Jean
Route 66
Jessamyn
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« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2010, 08:41:15 AM »

I don't know, Jean! To my earlier-19th-century mind, rouleaux are very popular applied padded bias strips. I don't know what to make of that name being applied to loopy fringe.
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Ms. Jean
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« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2010, 09:29:33 AM »


Thank you!

I certainly don't know.  I expect there is a more common term but find it odd that so far no one here knows that term!

The Rigolette made me think about this paragraph.  The pompons aren't attractive to me, but I can imagine a contrasting loopy wool fringe on the Rigolette.

The term rouleau has been used her in the SA to describe the fabric trim you mention.

Ahh, the pattern would just tell me "make up in the usual way!"

Jean
Route 66 (possibly at a Rouleau Fork in the Road???)
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Ms. Jean
Route 66
Marta Vincent
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« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2010, 09:45:43 AM »

Quote
Jean  Route 66 (possibly at a Rouleau Fork in the Road???)

Jean, you made me laugh out loud!!!! Grin Wink

Google translations came up with: Roll Fork.  Very helpful.... Wink
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Jessamyn
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« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2011, 06:38:31 PM »

This being brought up in the hairpin lace thread made me start looking again, and I found this interesting set of instructions from Miss Leslie's Lady's house-book, 1850, for a simple variant:

TO MAKE A ROULEAU OF RIBBON.?Rouleaus of satin ribbon are used for trimming caps and evening dresses. To render these rouleaus smooth and even, and without any risk of the edges getting loose, and standing out irregular and unsightly, they should be made over a fold of white paper. This paper must be a little longer than the intended rouleau and cut perfectly straight and even, and broad enough to be folded several times. The more the paper is folded, the rounder and handsomer will be the rouleau. If your paper is not long enough, you may lengthen it (before it is folded) by sewing or pasting to its end an additional slip of paper of the same breadth exactly. When the paper is properly folded, take the ribbon, and with a needle and thread tack one end of it to the paper-slip. Then roll or wind the ribbon round the paper; taking care not to stretch it too much, as the roll should be short and close, and not lengthy and drawn out. When you have rolled on as much ribbon as you want, secure its other end to the paper-slip, and begin to baste the rouleau on the cap, or dress, or whatever article you wish to trim with it. You must do this basting on the wrong side of the material to be trimmed; taking care not to take your stitches too far through so that they are in danger of catching the paper, or appearing on the outside of the rouleau. When the rouleau is all on, remove the tacking at the first end, and carefully draw out the folded slip of paper, which should then be put away for future use. When the paper is withdrawn, the ribbon will remain fixed in a round, handsome roll. Finally, secure it permanently at each end by a few stitches.

This is the only true way of making a neat and smooth rouleau, and is practised by good milliners and dressmakers.
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Ms. Jean
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« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2011, 04:45:12 AM »


Jessamyn, thank you!  I can imagine the three-dimensional loopy trim, and using the hairpin lace loom for the paper strip.

Still there's a distance between silk ribbon & wool yarn that Bevin & I want to cross...accurately!


Jean
Route 66


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Ms. Jean
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Jessamyn
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« Reply #7 on: June 06, 2011, 06:19:34 AM »

I'm kind of fascinated by the idea of bonnets and evening gowns decorated with this spiralled trim. I suspect that to modern eyes it might look rather like the cord that goes from a telephone handset to its base - but maybe I should be thinking of presents wrapped with curling ribbon.
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Ms. Jean
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« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2017, 08:34:43 AM »

Yes, this conversation started long ago.  I found a relevant reference in The Lady's Manual of Fancywork, 1859:

OBSOLETE ARTICLES

Rolio Fringe -- This was much used at one period for trimming mats, having a thick, long, fleecy looking pile.  It has not been made for a year or two.



Seems that the loopy trim I want was used for mats but not clothing and was out of date by the time of Ms. Pullen's writing in October of 1858.


Thanks, all!


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Ms. Jean
Route 66
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