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Author Topic: tatting on a first shirt - finished with pic  (Read 2666 times)
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Mother Dean
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« on: May 28, 2010, 07:48:02 PM »

Hello all,
Hopefully this is a simple question but probably one for someone who has seen an original or perhaps someone who is more knowledgeable of tatting in general.... Smiley

I am making first shirts for our next child.  I made some basic tatted trim but am now unsure if it is small/light enough. My rings measure just over 1/4 inch. I'm not sure of the size of cotton because I just used what I had laying around and it's not labeled.

It didn't even occur to me that it may be to heavy until I saw some work that one of the ladies at my lace guild was working on and it was so tiny and delicate that mine now looks..... out of proportion.

I love the ones from the Wisconsin Historical Society, however I am having trouble with scale. I see that some are larger than others but having never seen one in person, it's hard to tell.

If it's to heavy/large I can always use it on some underclothes for one of my older girls.

Any help is greatly appreciated,
Jessica

« Last Edit: September 28, 2010, 04:53:52 AM by Mother Dean » Logged

Elizabeth
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« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2010, 12:20:28 PM »

Is there any way to share a photo with something in it for scale? (It is okay to have the baby things perfectly plain, if it turns out to be too large for the period, or having other non-period characteristics. Have you seen Virginia Mescher's "Flitting Fingers"? It's a great reference on period tatting!)
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Elizabeth
Mother Dean
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« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2010, 03:27:36 PM »

Hello Elizabeth,
Thank you for your reply. Here is a picture:



The work hasn't been pressed yet and has been lying, in a bag, at the bottom of my work basket. The cotton that I used was left over from a crochet lace project from several years ago. I recently got into tatting and this was just practice. Nothing like hours of repetition to gain ability and confidence. Smiley

The more that I look at the tatting, the more I think it's to heavy. Is there such thing as too small and delicate on an infants item? I'm thinking of going with the smallest size cotton but the work will take much longer to achieve the same length.

I'm not sure if I have seen "Flitting Fingers" or not. I'll have to look.

Jessica

On a positive note, if it is too large, my 5 yr old will love some decorations on her underclothes Smiley
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vmescher
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« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2010, 10:11:22 AM »

Tatting thread in the 19th century was very small.  I have several parasols that are covered with tatting.  The thread size is 120 or smaller.  Modern tatting thread is size 80. 

Both pieces of tatting have chains in them and chains were not widely used until after the two shuttle method was developed in the mid-1860s.  Before then chains were made using a blunt needle and shuttle. 

If you need the book Flitting Fingers it is on our webpage (www.raggedsoldier.com) in the Books, Modern section. 

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Mother Dean
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« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2010, 05:10:57 PM »

Thanks for your reply.

I wasn't sure of the chains because the only examples that I have are illustrations of simple adornments from period magazines and they don't have the chain. But those examples are very simple, just ring - space - ring - space. The rings had a few picots, I think, but that was it.

I am taken with lace and have been for several years. My interest until recently has been lace in general but now I suppose I will be focusing more on this particular period. I only have a few period books in my collection so thank you for your link. Smiley

Do you have suggestions of where to find thread that small? I will check with my guild also. One of the ladies repairs old lace and she many know of a distributor. I stopped by Needle & Thread the other day (my first time in there, that's an entirely different story) and saw that they had some "lace thread". I will have to look at it again to see if it has a size. It was very small!!!

As always, you all are great. Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge. It is greatly appreciated! Smiley

Jessica
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Jannike
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« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2010, 04:30:25 AM »

Hi,

Well, Lacis carries hand sewing thread that small (120) and I think they have even thinner thread than that.
I have tried making tatted lace with size 80 tatting thread and the hand sewing thread that
Lacis carries in size 100 and size 120. There is quite a difference in the lace fineness that you get
when changing from the size 80 thread to the size 120 thread. The problem though is that it's really
hard closing small rings with the 120 thread. If you have just the slightest amount of moisture or grease
on your fingers it just will not close up. And I never have that problem with other sizes of tatting thread, the
80 is no problem at all whatsoever. Maybe you are better than me at closing rings, but it will probably take some
time making the lace as you probably will have to wash your hands and dry them quite often. The thread from
Lacis is really good quality though, it is of course pure cotton and it is really stiff and not soft at all so it's easy to
work with because of the stiffness.

/Jannike
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Mother Dean
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« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2010, 08:02:49 AM »

Jannike,
Thanks so much for the assistance. I have just started with tatting and I do find that stiff thread makes a lot of difference. I will check out the Lacis website. Smiley

Thanks again,
Jessica
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Jannike
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« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2010, 09:44:28 AM »

Yes, the Lacis thread is definately much better to work with than regular sewing thread, I've tried that
too  Grin

I thought I could add a picture of my thread thickness and lace fineness tests. These little pieces are made with
the same amount of knots in each ring and
they are not starched or ironed. As I live in Sweden I don't have any pennies to show the sizing
with so I hope you can get some idea of the sizes with an inch marked tape.

The top one is Lacis 120, then Lacis 100 and the lowest is the usual DMC cotton size 80.



/Jannike
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Mother Dean
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« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2010, 10:30:14 AM »

Beautiful! Beautiful! Beautiful!  Cheesy

Thank you so much for posting your image. This is so helpful!

Jessica

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catquiltlady
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« Reply #9 on: July 07, 2010, 01:12:57 PM »

Jessica,

I am a tatter and I agree with Elizabeth that you probably need to use modern size 80 thread for baby things. I order all my threads and supplies from Handy Hands at http://www.hhtatting.com/. They are wonderful! Their Lizbeth thread (100% Egyptian Cotton) is fabulous to work with. They will be coming out with a size 80 in August. If you can't wait that long, I recommend Majestic size 80 thread.

Please post the finished product. I tat lace for all of my underthings and hankies.

Beth S.
Columbia, TN
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Mother Dean
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« Reply #10 on: July 07, 2010, 01:49:37 PM »

Hello Beth,
I still plan on trimming at least one undershirt with tatting. However, the baby decided to come two weeks early..... so I don't know when I will be working on it.Smiley

I would love to see your tatting.
Jessica
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Ms. Jean
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« Reply #11 on: July 07, 2010, 02:08:07 PM »


Welcome to your Little Stranger!

Early Huh  My own DS was due July 18, after 2 1/2 weeks of contractions a couple of surgeons delivered him on August 3.

That was a long, hot summer....

Jean
Route 66
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Mother Dean
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« Reply #12 on: September 17, 2010, 08:22:27 PM »

Hello all,
Well, I have started working on this again. My little guy had outgrown his small size infant first shirts before I had them adorned... so I made the larger size and am frantically working on some tatting to trim at least the front before he outgrows this one also.

Now I have come to another question. How do you go about attaching the tatting? This sounds silly but there is just a thread between rings. I am guessing that you just sort of wind the sewing thread around the tatting thread as you make stitches in the fabric.

Thanks for your comments and suggestions,
Jessica
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #13 on: September 18, 2010, 10:09:05 AM »

You can whipstitch the upper edge right to the garment. I'd do it in a separate step from hemming the sleeve/neckline edge, though, just in case you ever want to or need to remove it.
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Elizabeth
Mother Dean
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« Reply #14 on: September 28, 2010, 04:52:17 AM »



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« Reply #15 on: September 28, 2010, 07:17:28 AM »

Very nice, Jessica!  Kiss
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« Reply #16 on: September 28, 2010, 10:16:02 AM »

Oh that is just beautiful! I love the way tatting looks, I really need to get back at mine so I can actually use it on something!  Smiley
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Mother Dean
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« Reply #17 on: September 28, 2010, 11:27:26 AM »

Thank you ladies, I really like the way that it looks too. Smiley I was very surprised at how easy it was and how well it turned out. Cheesy
Jessica
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