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Author Topic: Crowing about Crowning Glory  (Read 89336 times)
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Ms. Jean
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« Reply #280 on: March 30, 2012, 02:54:35 PM »

I know I've seen pics too - in the past - but I don't have one now and I am trying to get her to see that what I am talking about did exist and is worth at least trying.  Better than a modern short style.   Wink

Joanna, I sent you two pictures from a program in October.  I used gel & center part to slick back short hair.  I made a ribbon net attached to a headband with some ribbon trim.  (Bought it all at Big Lots, so please forgive me for the fiber content.)  I do have a bun attached to the back with a comb.

Recently, one if my Head Start students said "Ms. Jean, you have the same hair as Justin Bieber" so that's what we're working with here!

Using a metal headband and silk ribbon would have been more comfortable ethically and that is on my project list.

Hope this helps,

Jean
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Ms. Jean
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Joanna Jones
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« Reply #281 on: March 30, 2012, 08:53:49 PM »

Micaila - perfect - thank you!

Jean, I had no clue your hair was that short when I saw the pics - that's great - thanks!

Using fake hair in a bun is step 2 - step 1 is to convince her that a bit of styling of her current hair can go a long way - right now it is just clean, soft, kind of shaggy short, with a side part and bangs.  I think it can look a lot like Micaila's first pic with some gel and a headband. 
« Last Edit: March 30, 2012, 08:56:53 PM by Joanna Jones » Logged
BethT
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« Reply #282 on: March 31, 2012, 08:59:52 AM »


Also found this one in my files from a bit ago (read YEARS!) with no headband, but an adult woman with short hair.
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Anna Worden Bauersmith
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« Reply #283 on: March 31, 2012, 11:47:09 AM »

The photo above is from Mt. Morris, NY. All of the images in the set (both copies and cdvs) are from the Livingston Country area along what was the Genesee Valley Canal coming out of Rochester.
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Anna Worden Bauersmith
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BethT
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« Reply #284 on: March 31, 2012, 04:27:15 PM »

Thanks Anna!  Now I can go back and label it....really bad about doing that.....
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Gen. 3:21
The LORD God made garments of skin for Adam and his wife and clothed them.
 
Thus began fashion.
Joanna Jones
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« Reply #285 on: April 13, 2012, 04:45:04 PM »

I snagged this from Annette Bethke's Pinterest site (who snagged it from Stacey Hampton's site etc...)




Anyhow....if you look closely at the place where her bun meets her head, you can clearly see the line of scalp showing between the two.  So where are the ends of the side hair?  I always assumed they were rolled under, then the twisting continued around under the bun, or on top of the bun, or whatever.  But the bun seems completely seperate from the rest.

Huh??
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Jessamyn
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« Reply #286 on: April 14, 2012, 03:58:42 PM »

Here's the big version where you can see it a lot better: http://pinterest.com/pin/171207223304465522/

I can imagine that either the ends are rolled up into the "rat" area, or do in fact get involved in the bun. I only see a part slightly above and in front of the bun - most of the join between the side pieces and the bun is blocked by what I think is a comb.
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Veronica Carey
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« Reply #287 on: April 14, 2012, 05:05:01 PM »

Jess, you know what?  Looking at the enlarged photo, I clearly see that the light "line" that you see which you think is her scalp is actually the sheen of her hair in the hair coil which comes from the side roll.  When my hair was long, the twisted coil from the side hair, which started after the pouf over the side rats, was as narrow as her coil.
If you look at the sheen of her hair in other parts of her coif, it is almost the same value of light.
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MrsPeebles
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« Reply #288 on: April 14, 2012, 06:18:06 PM »

Yes, that line that you mention is actually the last of the side twist wrapped around the bun. I wear my hair in the same fashion, and my side twist ends are so tiny and narrow that they are almost completely hidden from view. Cheesy
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Joanna Jones
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« Reply #289 on: April 16, 2012, 05:14:53 AM »

After taking a magnifying glass to the picture  Grin I must agree that you ladies are spot on!  Thank you - that was really bothering me.
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Anna G.
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« Reply #290 on: May 05, 2012, 09:42:44 PM »

Hello everyone! I thought I would share with you the Youtube tutorial I made showing how to do a really simple mid-19th century hairstyle that involves two twisted braids in the back and pieces of hair that swoop over the ears. It's a new style that I tried out at last weekend's reenactment, and I got a ton of questions/comments about how I did this style.

Anyways, the finished product looks like this (please ignore the little tail sticking out at the bottom!):



And you can view the video tutorial here!
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Heidi Hollister
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« Reply #291 on: May 06, 2012, 07:37:00 PM »

wonderful tutorial! 
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Anna G.
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« Reply #292 on: May 07, 2012, 07:24:47 AM »

Thank you, Heidi! I'll try my best next time to show more of the back of my head when I do these tutorials. I've gotten some comments about that. Wink
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Heidi Hollister
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« Reply #293 on: September 14, 2012, 10:21:54 PM »

For those of us with short hair troubles...  This solution dated 1855:

"Hair in waxed bandeaux fastened at the back of the head by a pretty ornamental comb. Loops of rose colored ribbon mingled with leaves and blossoms of white jessamine extended from the ear on each side and united in a bow and flowing ends below the comb This is an excellent arrangement for those whose hair has been thinned or lost in illness"



« Last Edit: September 14, 2012, 10:25:05 PM by Heidi Hollister » Logged

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Sarah K.
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« Reply #294 on: April 25, 2013, 09:10:33 PM »

I'm just starting to try more period hairstyles - for modern wear I usually just have one long braid down my back. As we speak, though, my hair is in a braided coronet, because I just felt like it today!
I think my hair is about 30" long right now. And curly. So even though it is theoretically long, it never looks quite as long as it ought!

Some pics of what I've been trying lately:

This one is based on the hairstyle suggested in either the Dec. 1862 or Feb. '63 Godey's (can't remember at the moment):


This one my sister calls "the pretzel":
 
I promise the curls were originally shorter, but this was at the end of a hot day - they'd drooped!

And this is what happens if I just roll it all up in a bunch. Keep in mind that my hair would love to do ringlets on its own if I let it!

Admittedly this was done quickly, and for a modern day, so I wasn't smoothing and pinning as much as I do when doing a period hairstyle.
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BethT
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« Reply #295 on: April 26, 2013, 03:44:39 PM »

Having very curly hair myself, I've found that Water is Your Best Friend. Cheesy  Also, I find that the more non-silicone conditioner I use the better it stays without frizzing.  And I am an admitted cheapskate, so I use Tresemme naturals which is about  three or four dollars a bottle. Cheesy  The only reason I put that caveat on is because stuff geared towards curlies tends to get expensive REALLY quickly. 

Coconut butter is relatively inexpensive and also helps to smooth, if that's what you're looking for in a period hairstyle. 

Also, don't worry about the smooth straight look.  Unless you straighten you won't get it, and there are pictures of curly haired women in the 1860s as well. Cheesy
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Gen. 3:21
The LORD God made garments of skin for Adam and his wife and clothed them.
 
Thus began fashion.
Miss Ruth
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« Reply #296 on: May 01, 2013, 02:25:43 PM »

Love the second hair-do! It's BEAUTIFUL!
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Sarah K.
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« Reply #297 on: May 01, 2013, 04:33:55 PM »

Thank you, Miss Ruth!! I had fun coiling the braids.

I also found the picture that the first Hairdo was based on: It's from Godey's, December 1862, page 541.



The description it refers to reads as follows (from page 617):

NEW STYLE OF COIFFURE FOR A YOUNG LADY.
(See engravings, page 541.)
To dress the hair in this style the back hair must be combed and drawn towards the left ear. Twist half of it and coil it round, sticking the comb in it in order to have both hands free. Then twist the other half, and coil it as represented in plate, and place the comb in the centre. The front hair is arranged in heavy braids.


The problem I had with the hairstyle was that my hair seemed to be too long and too thick: I had too much to coil on the back of my head, and no place for the ends of the braids from the front hair to go. Also, I don't have a comb! But that can be remedied. Smiley
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I put my bashfulness in my pocket, and plunge into a long conversation on the war, the weather, music, Carlyle, skating, genius, hoops, and the immortality of the soul. Hospital Sketches Alcott
Amorette Bertilson
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« Reply #298 on: September 13, 2013, 11:56:33 AM »

I've enjoyed your posts, though I am silent.

I posted on my blog a post and pictures of a sort of late 1850's hairstyle that can be translated to other eras. Since I'm not 'out and about' reenacting yet, all I can do is wistfully make hairstyles once in a blue moon. I am trying to perfect my technique and I hope to help you all out. Someday I may actually do tutorials, but probably not for awhile. This hairstyle might look a lot like other one's I've posted, but I'm sure it's still different, and I'm proud of it. But mainly, it's informational. And if by any chance I could seem judgmental anywhere in the post, I do not mean to be.

http://littlewoodsyhovel.wordpress.com/2013/09/13/hairstyle-of-the-1850s/

(I posted mainly to get the pictures uploaded. I am lazy like that.)

Feel free to comment with critique or helpful whatevers if you can. I would love to know anything I could be doing wrong, and anything I'm misinforming about. Critique to the tiniest detail!
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Jessamyn
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« Reply #299 on: November 20, 2013, 09:50:16 AM »

Amorette, I finally remembered to come back here and take your link. (I think you might get more replies if you embedded the pics here in the thread.) You have done a beautiful job: it looks extremely authentic.
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