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Author Topic: Crowing about Crowning Glory  (Read 83788 times)
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Lady_Irish
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« Reply #20 on: December 14, 2009, 07:30:37 PM »

Elizabeth-- Thank you! I wasn't sure it would turn out alright as I do the back without benefit of a mirror! I thought my signature had my name in it... I apologize!

~Deanna
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EFAldridge
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« Reply #21 on: December 14, 2009, 07:47:11 PM »

Deanna, I'm sorry, it does have your name in it. I must have missed it. Smiley
~Elizabeth
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Elizabeth F Aldridge

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Lady_Irish
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« Reply #22 on: December 14, 2009, 08:09:37 PM »

Nope... I just fixed it! Grin
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Mary Gutzke
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« Reply #23 on: December 14, 2009, 09:07:41 PM »

Wow, I have to say I am really impressed with everyone's lovely hairstyles! Hair is definitely one of those details that can make or break the overall look. Even something like getting that absolutely straight part can be tricky, but contributes to "the look". I just wish I could have the patience to grow out my hair long enough that I could do some nifty styles. That and trying to get my cat to stop munching on my hair while I'm sleeping, causing me to have an unintentional layered look (is my hair really that tasty??).
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Mary Gutzke
Marta Vincent
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« Reply #24 on: December 15, 2009, 10:17:53 AM »

An empty Kleenex box or a clean sandwich baggy works well too.

I use the empty Kleenex box method.  Grin
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Fiddlin Girl
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« Reply #25 on: December 15, 2009, 11:35:01 AM »

Lady Irish and EFAldridge,

Wow, your hair is SO beautiful!! I love hte color and it look so shiny and pretty. I really admire anyone with nice hair. Smiley Great styles. I will have to try them one someone.....*evil grin while everyone runs away....
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Glenna Jo Christen
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« Reply #26 on: December 15, 2009, 03:40:47 PM »

I really need to scan a litho I have of a woman looking in a mirror so it not only shows her hair and face from the front side, but the back of her hair as well. It was my inspiration for the hairstyle I've been wearing for literally decades in reenacting. Now I have to wait for a month or more after my current haircut to even be able to get my front and side hair to stay back off my face. ;-<
No matter how long my hair got before I chopped most of it off a couple years ago I never managed to get more than a little knot of hair in the back for a bun. It's always been pretty fine and, the longer it got the thinner it seemed to get. Fortunately, women back then had the same problem, hence the frequent use of rats (and "mice" too for small side puffs when those were in fashion) and false hair in various styles and amounts.
There are times I have considered going really short and getting a full wig... the trouble is, there aren't any wigs I've seen that could be dressed into a good period style and not scream "Wig!!!" I'd probably need new bonnets to fit over the wig too. ;-)

Glenna Jo (only partially 'scalped') Christen
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Lady_Irish
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« Reply #27 on: December 15, 2009, 08:14:32 PM »

Ms. Glenna--
Bonnets are my biggest issue. There doesn't seem to be one deep enough to go over my hair in back and still sit somewhere on my head! My hair is too, um, big! Shocked Sometimes I wish it were thinner but then I let my hair down and realize that, no, no I don't! Grin I'm a bit of a hair snob. But it does make it interesting in this time period (or any period other than our current one) for me to do my hair. I can easily get away with twisting my hair into a basic bun and securing it with a well-placed monster clippie in modern life. But whenever I do anything "historic", I find myself at a loss as to how on earth I'm sposed to get this mass of hair into some semblance of period-correctness! As you said, they had the problem of thin hair back then and had ways to combat it with rats and such.
Does anyone know what they did if they had long THICK hair??? I can only handle so many pins! And I've been training my hair to be more "natural" as far as oils for the last couple years but that doesn't seem to help either. Huh
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Glenna Jo Christen
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« Reply #28 on: December 15, 2009, 09:11:31 PM »

I suspect they may not have let it get as long as yours if it was that thick. They only needed it to be long enough to style it the way they wanted and not so long it becomes a problem to deal with.
That's the problem with us as reenactors, wanting hair that fits our modern styles or taste and hair that works for period styles. How much we each are willing to compromise our modern preferences to be more historically accurate varies from person to person and over time with each person at least in some cases (like me ;->)
As for getting a bonnet that fits your mass of hair, have you ever considered having a bonnet custom made for you with a deeper crown at the back to accommodate your hair? I know the milliner who makes bonnets for my shop does custom orders for my customer and I'm sure Mrs. P can probably also accommodate your special bonnet needs as well. Just a thought...

Glenna Jo Christen (who never had to worry about too thick hair. Tongue)
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lillian
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« Reply #29 on: December 18, 2009, 07:55:43 AM »

Bonnets are my biggest issue. There doesn't seem to be one deep enough to go over my hair in back and still sit somewhere on my head! My hair is too, um, big! Shocked

Here is a deeper straw bonnet, the straw folk bonnet, and it is on sale http://www.prayercoverings.com/catalog.php?sale=yes
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Jessamyn
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« Reply #30 on: December 18, 2009, 08:06:36 AM »

That style is passable for 1840s (the straw is too coarse but the shape is all right), but not appropriate for later periods. Good price, though!
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Heidi Hollister
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« Reply #31 on: December 18, 2009, 10:20:38 AM »

Mary, your cat munches your hair too??!!!  My kitty mostly does it when she thinks I'm not getting up when she wants me to.  She never tries eating Peter's hair though... She likes my front hairs best, but if the ends of my hair are more available, she'll go for that.  When she starts munching (or playing with my hair rats) I say "HEY!  My hairball!  Go make your own!"  Doesn't stop her though...

I found the best way to keep her away from my hair at night is to put my hair into a braid before going to bed, and then when she attacks the hair in front, I put a pillow over my head, pull my braid close to me and she'll eventually stop trying.
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Semper Sewus Historicana!
Glenna Jo Christen
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« Reply #32 on: December 18, 2009, 09:02:30 PM »

The deep brim straw bonnet on that web site is a Shaker (even though the originals were woven straw, not coiled braided straw as this one) While the shape is 1840s for a fashion bonnet, but when worn as a sun bonnet with a long curtain it is appropriate for the 1860s as they were being made and sold to the "world's people" (non Shakers) right up into the early 20th century. Search for Shaker bonnet and you will find other threads where we discussed this and I noted period references to them being worn.

Glenna Jo Christen
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Jessamyn
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« Reply #33 on: December 19, 2009, 01:22:56 PM »

For me the stumbling block for 1850s and later wear is that actual Shaker bonnets were always woven (as Glenna Jo briefly noted). For me, the leap from finely braided straw to coarsely braided straw is one thing, but from finely woven straw to coarsely braided is just too far afield. (And I'm sure Anna would cringe at even the step to coarsely braided!) So, this is one of those how-much-variance-can-you-tolerate situations.

I keep fantasizing about making a better Shaker bonnet out of a couple of those woven placemats that were so popular in the '70s...
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kaye Vines
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« Reply #34 on: December 19, 2009, 04:41:48 PM »

Here is a deeper straw bonnet, the straw folk bonnet, and it is on sale http://www.prayercoverings.com/catalog.php?sale=yes
Quote

I have the spoon bonnet from this site and I really like it.  I'm not an expert of course, but I like it and it suits my middle class impression.
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mr.darcy1
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« Reply #35 on: December 19, 2009, 06:00:36 PM »

I used an original dag in my collection, but here is a similar inspiration picture for the width I was going for:


Here's a picture of me on the right at the Dickens Fair in my 1840s attire.  I have two hair rats on each side to achieve the "poof."  The back was finished with braids.


Here's a back view from a similar hairstyle but with looped braids:


Regards,
Chandra
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Chandra Miller

Dressing the 1840s
http://dressingthe1840s.blogspot.com/
BetsyConnolly
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« Reply #36 on: December 19, 2009, 06:19:06 PM »

Chandra, that is just GORGEOUS! I wish I could get that look! Must keep practicing...
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Betsy Connolly
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EFAldridge
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« Reply #37 on: December 19, 2009, 09:24:26 PM »

Oh Chandra! I love your beautiful style! Gorgeous!
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Elizabeth F Aldridge

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Jessamyn
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« Reply #38 on: December 20, 2009, 09:38:48 AM »

Chandra, you look picture-perfect as always!

Chandra's beautiful shining hair reminds me that one of the things that bothers me about the current era is that we don't appreciate medium-colored hair. It seems like every model and actress has a choice of super-blonde, golden brown with blonde highlights, nearly black, or fire-engine red, but in the 19th century they appreciated all those lovely mid-tones, which show to great advantage in a smooth, glossy updo. Unbroken golden brown, chestnut, auburn, and of course "Jeannie with the light-brown hair" - I think we miss out by not appreciating all these lovely, but subtle, tones.
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Glenna Jo Christen
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« Reply #39 on: December 20, 2009, 12:17:06 PM »

I can't agree more about both Chandra's fabulous 'do' as well as Jessamyn's comments on hair color. In an era before hair dyes that actually work without destroying the hair, those lovely medium brown shades were very common and, with the judicious use of hair oils and pomades, shone with a luster that many today would envy.
Oh to have enough hair to even cover rats half the size needed for such a do as Chandra's... At least I can enjoy the sight on other's heads if not my own.  Smiley

Glenna Jo Christen
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