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Author Topic: Chemisette construction  (Read 6121 times)
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Denise Butler
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« on: June 30, 2009, 02:36:43 PM »

I am going to make this chemisette:


What are your thoughts on a suitable material? Also, how would you make the ruffles?

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Denise
Eileen Hook
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« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2009, 02:59:48 PM »

All the chemisettes I've made have had a regular collar, not a ruffle like that one, but I would suggest you use the selvage edge of whatever fabric you use as the edge of the ruffle. I did that for one of my day caps and it makes a nice crisp edge. I've never been very good at rolled hems, they always come out too bulky.
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Veronica Carey
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« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2009, 03:08:29 PM »

I would look for a very fine white cotton swiss batiste.  They can be expensive, but this won't take much yardage.  I love the idea of using the selvedge for the ruffle, so long as it is suitable.  I have been disappointed in some white fabrics that have a single colored thread at or near the edge of the selvedge, so I can't use that trick.
I would also consider a cotton organdy for the chemisette, depending on how fancy a dress it was going under.
Veronica
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Brooke Whitaker
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« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2009, 04:06:51 PM »

No help, but please post pictures when its done. I think it will bve awesome!  Wink Cheesy
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Marta Vincent
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« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2009, 06:48:50 PM »

I expect that the ruffle is box pleated, and it probably could be made of a fold of organdy or fine lawn - whatever the chemisette is made of.  It also could be fine white cotton lace.
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Denise Butler
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« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2010, 04:03:22 PM »

I have (finally) started making the chemisette....


The fabric is lawn. I still have to play with the final neckline, but right now, I am thinking about the ruffles. I wanted to use the selvedge edge, but unfortunately it came with those wonderful pin holes... and washing didn't eliminate them. I thought about a folded strip of the lawn, but that just seems too bulky for this fabric.

Then, I found this whitework trim in my basket, and am wondering if it would work for a gathered ruffle? The weight of the trim matches the weight of the lawn.


If not, I'll just go with one folded ruffle, rather than two (an option mentioned in the description).

Also, any thoughts as to how the ruffles were attached? I am considering sewing the inner most ruffle to the wrong side and folding it over to the right side, then sewing the second ruffle over that, then a bias strip over the raw edge of that.

But, I am most definitely open to period correct ruffle and attachment options!!
« Last Edit: June 21, 2010, 04:06:06 PM by Denise Butler » Logged

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Denise
Elizabeth
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« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2010, 07:38:40 PM »

I like the simple edge, though the machined entredeux is usually found later in the century.

What about using the batiste itself, and just doing a very fine whipped edge by hand? You could pleat or gather it down the middle, with whipped edges, for a very delicate frill with nice edges.

If you have The Dressmaker's Guide (2nd edition), there are instructions for a fine hem in the accessories section at the back. You can also find some tips here on the forum, under "Narrow Hemming Without Cussing". Smiley
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Elizabeth
Denise Butler
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« Reply #7 on: June 24, 2010, 03:18:20 AM »

Thank you, Elizabeth. I liked the trim, but something about it just didn't seem right for 1860s. So, I'll put it back in my basket and try to do a narrow hem on the lawn. Between Dressmaker's Guide and Carolann's hands-on class, I might be able to manage it.
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Denise
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« Reply #8 on: June 24, 2010, 07:10:43 AM »

I tried looking for the thread "Narrow Hemming Without Cussing"   Huh and found it under "Narrow Hem, No Cussing"  Cheesy It is there.. really.
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Denise Butler
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« Reply #9 on: July 18, 2010, 07:02:43 AM »

I finished the chemisette in time for my train ride to Seneca Falls. It has two rows of ruffles that have hand-sewn narrow hems - the lawn was very nice to work with:


Here it is "in action." I have just deboarded the train in Seneca Falls and am getting ready to do a little sight-seeing.


« Last Edit: July 18, 2010, 07:05:48 AM by Denise Butler » Logged

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Denise
Veronica Carey
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« Reply #10 on: July 18, 2010, 07:12:04 AM »

How very lovely!  You look wonderful--hope you had a terrific day!
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Jennifer Hill
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« Reply #11 on: July 18, 2010, 01:01:01 PM »

Gorgeous!  What lovely work!  I hope you had a marvelous time.  Please tell us!  Jennifer
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K Krewer
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« Reply #12 on: July 18, 2010, 02:35:56 PM »

Smashing!
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Becky K
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« Reply #13 on: July 18, 2010, 02:44:09 PM »

Denise, I've had my eye on an original gown that is very similar style to yours, what pattern did you use? Thanks!

Both the dress and chemisette look great!
« Last Edit: July 18, 2010, 03:18:05 PM by Becky K » Logged
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« Reply #14 on: July 18, 2010, 02:46:12 PM »

Thrilling!!! Cheesy:D You look so lovely, Denise!!!!
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« Reply #15 on: July 18, 2010, 06:10:33 PM »

You did such a good job. The whole bit is beautiful. I am so glad you posted both pictures. Your sheer  is truly lovely.

Lisa
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Veronica Carey
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« Reply #16 on: July 18, 2010, 06:55:33 PM »

Denise, I just noticed that your lovely sheer dress appears to be the Fig Leaf Patterns "Atlanta History Center" Dress (Peachtree Mercantile).  I wanted to tell you that when the textile curator allowed some of us to examine the dress "up close and personal" I was especially interested in the cuff construction, and the cuff had been tacked down (up actually) so that it stayed folded back properly.  I asked the curator whether this was done by the museum for times when it was on exhibit, or whether it was originally like that when it was donated by the Robert Smith family after they found it in a trunk.  She said it was originally like that.
So, I have made the dress once  and tacked the cuffs, and am making it in a sheer now (for myself) and will tack them again.

Anyway, you look superb!
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« Reply #17 on: July 18, 2010, 07:46:09 PM »

Lovely!

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Denise Butler
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« Reply #18 on: July 19, 2010, 02:29:00 PM »

...the cuff had been tacked down (up actually) so that it stayed folded back properly.  I asked the curator whether this was done by the museum for times when it was on exhibit, or whether it was originally like that when it was donated by the Robert Smith family after they found it in a trunk.  She said it was originally like that.

The cuffs were tacked?!? Thank you for that information! I'll add your note to my pattern package, and tack those rascally cuffs in place when I re-do the bodice (it's a bit too blousy). I was blaming the cuff-flop on the voile, since it is softer than the original cotton sounds... I've threatened to lightly starch the whole thing...
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Denise
Denise Butler
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« Reply #19 on: July 19, 2010, 02:40:27 PM »

Thank you everyone for your compliments! Hand-sewing can be very challenging for me (fine motor control-challenged that I am), but everything went very smoothly (if slowly) on this project.

The train trip was a lot of fun... even if it was hot and humid - again!  Angry

This year I walked a few of the residential streets near the park where we deboarded... they were shaded, and I love old houses. There were some really nice gardens, too. Besides, I had to be back in order to do a presentation on Victorian undergarments. I had a great audience, and the questions kept coming even after we had to board and head back home. Unfortunately, I didn't get too many pictures.
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Denise
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