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Brooke Whitaker
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« Reply #20 on: April 16, 2009, 01:10:48 PM »

awesome finds, Shawnra.
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Cool-Born a Yankee, but a Rebel by choice- Cool
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My blog: http://stitchesofthepast.blogspot.com/
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Angela Harris
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« Reply #21 on: April 17, 2009, 07:09:09 AM »

Denise found this site:

http://www.meg-andrews.com/

Thanks, Denise!

Angela
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GwendolynnPhillips
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« Reply #22 on: April 17, 2009, 01:41:32 PM »

Incidentally, the homespun dress in the Smithsonian Collection makes reference to a "large fruit stain."  I was lucky enough to view this dress and chat with the curator a few years ago.  They tested the stain and found it is blueberry.  Isn't technology cool?!
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BethT
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« Reply #23 on: April 17, 2009, 03:44:10 PM »

Get out, that is too good!   I must say I'm (if you'll pardon the expression) geeking out over here. Cheesy  Blueberry?  !!!

-Beth
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Gen. 3:21
The LORD God made garments of skin for Adam and his wife and clothed them.
 
Thus began fashion.
Angela Harris
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« Reply #24 on: April 18, 2009, 05:16:47 AM »

To continue placing all resources in one place, I thought that I would add this tid-bit of information:

I am working on a silk dress right now, and I was using the following dress as construction inspiration: http://antiquedress.com/item6304.htm

Notice the tape that the skirt is attached to.  Carolann Schmitt pointed out that the waistband is normally cut from the common lining or is a piece of scrap fabric.  However, when it was not, they used petersham (grosgrain) and she noted that a tightly woven tape would suffice as well.  I tried the linen tape, and I was not happy with it.  Luckily Jessamyn chimed in and stated that Wm. Booth Draper carries 100% silk petersham! 

I have since ordered it, and it's fabulous!  Check it out:



It holds good form and has a great feel to it.  And it's only $3/yard! 

Thanks for all of your help, Carolann & Jessamyn!

Enjoy!
http://www.wmboothdraper.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=24&products_id=761
« Last Edit: April 18, 2009, 05:18:58 AM by Angela Harris » Logged
Heidi Hollister
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« Reply #25 on: April 19, 2009, 05:19:46 PM »

This has been posted before I know, but this is one of my favorite fashion plate sites.  It's all in French, but the images are high resolution and a wonderful resource.

http://www.bibliothequedesartsdecoratifs.com/consultation2/consultation.html
Fill in the blanks as follows:
Termes de recherche: Mode

Type de document: click the box that says Collection Maciet

Then click the button that says Rechercher
Voir les vignettes Maciet

Search for the date you want  and click on the blue number next to it.

Some french words will pop up to you right, Click Voir les vignettes Maciet and revel in all the wonderful fashion plates.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2009, 05:45:45 PM by Heidi Hollister » Logged

Semper Sewus Historicana!
Joanna Jones
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« Reply #26 on: April 20, 2009, 06:06:50 AM »

Thank you, Heidi - I had lost the instructions for getting through to those plates!
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Brooke Whitaker
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« Reply #27 on: April 20, 2009, 04:23:23 PM »

If your need to read something on the French website this might help http://www.translate.google.com/
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Cool-Born a Yankee, but a Rebel by choice- Cool
                      -Brooke-

My blog: http://stitchesofthepast.blogspot.com/
My Etsy Shop:  www.stitchesofthepast.etsy.com
Anna
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« Reply #28 on: April 21, 2009, 10:55:54 AM »

Anna Warden:

Thank you Thank you Thank you Thank you Thank you Thank you!!!!!!!!!!

These information links are exactly what I have been searching for my research.

I've only been a member of this forum for 2 days and have found tons of needful info. Smiley Smiley Smiley

Anna
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Joanna Jones
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« Reply #29 on: April 21, 2009, 03:07:01 PM »

The Graceful Lady
originals -  http://www.thegracefullady.com/civilwargowns/originals_OriginalGarments.htm
Fashion plates - http://www.thegracefullady.com/civilwargowns/originals_FashionPlates.htm
CDVs - http://www.thegracefullady.com/civilwargowns/originals_CartedeVisites.htm
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allaussie
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« Reply #30 on: April 21, 2009, 04:08:59 PM »

Tara Maginnis also has a nice collection of fashion plates http://www.costumes.org/history/100pages/timelinepages/1850to70a.htm
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Jessamyn
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« Reply #31 on: April 27, 2009, 05:39:47 AM »

Demode's pages of Real Women's Clothing, 1600-1919, can be a very useful resource. Kendra, the site owner, has corralled a large number of direct links to clothing in museums and arranged them by year, as well as separating them out into underclothes, day dresses, and evening wear.

Just be mindful that the dates she's using for the items are simply the ones that the museums give, and as we all know they do get them wrong sometimes! So do exercise that critical eye.
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Eileen Trestain
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« Reply #32 on: May 03, 2009, 03:24:52 PM »

I would like to include the listings of websites, etc, in the training manual for the Dame School here at the fort.  Would there be any objections to that?

Their next class subject has to do with fashion.

Eileen
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Joanna Jones
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« Reply #33 on: May 05, 2009, 05:16:47 AM »

I went ahead and am posting this site, posted by Anne in another section:
http://ccdl.libraries.claremont.edu/collection.php?alias=/fpc

Please be aware that not all of the dates seem to be correct!
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southerngal
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« Reply #34 on: May 12, 2009, 10:27:02 PM »

I found a great article in Southern Practioner.

http://tinyurl.com/pag3fb

This is what grabbed my attention.

"Almost immediately after the Confederate Government was organized at Montgomery it was confronted by strong facts and large figures as to required supplies by the different departments. Agents were sent at once to Europe, most of whom were in London, where they established a weekly newspaper, with local correspondents in nearly every Southern town from Virginia to Texas."

The article contains substitutes for medication and is a wealth of information.

Margie Daniels
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rrbeers
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« Reply #35 on: June 02, 2009, 06:37:08 AM »

I just found this website where you can get custom printed fabrics on natural fibers: http://www.dpi-sf.com/fiber-prinitg.html 

Expensive? Yes, but it says the price range is $11-$85 a yard.  $11 isn't all that bad for a perfect repro of something, though I don't know what fiber the $11 is for! It looks like maybe in the next five-ten years this will be more and more affordable! Smiley
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marieporteus
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« Reply #36 on: June 13, 2009, 04:56:29 AM »

I'd like to add my thanks as well, Anna.   Cheesy  Would there be any objection to scooping these websites up and including them in a guide we are construction for new members of our civilian group?  I have a good number of them already bookmarked from use over the years, but I don't want to just steal them (of course, I'd cite the source of the group!).

Thanks,
Marie
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always in fashion
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« Reply #37 on: August 20, 2009, 04:23:16 AM »

http://www.just2tailors.com/?category=Hats

For hats, bonnets and socks.

The bonnets and hats may not be the best of quality or even totally 100% dead on but if you are on the poor side of the street they will certainly work for making do and getting you into a bonnet instead of walking around town without.

Lisa
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rrbeers
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« Reply #38 on: August 21, 2009, 02:17:41 PM »

Lisa, my personal opinion on the bonnets from the site you posted is that you should save your money and wait a while until you can afford a good blank.  Only $10-$20 more and you can buy one from a good seller who specializes in our era, rather than the 1700s.
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always in fashion
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« Reply #39 on: August 21, 2009, 03:21:42 PM »

Lisa, my personal opinion on the bonnets from the site you posted is that you should save your money and wait a while until you can afford a good blank.  Only $10-$20 more and you can buy one from a good seller who specializes in our era, rather than the 1700s.

So, it is probably best to save for a better one and go ahead and wear nothing until  then? Just making sure since i have no bonnet at all and want to look and portray life in 1855 in Missouri as closely as possible. You see most of the gals at the site wear these wide brimmed things.... truly um.... Cry

Lisa
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