Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 6   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Cold lunches  (Read 17611 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
NoahBriggs
Guest
« Reply #20 on: April 02, 2009, 05:58:53 AM »

We should rename The Imperial March from Star Wars as The March of the Critical Thinkers.
Logged
Brooke Whitaker
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2703


♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦Me♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦


WWW
« Reply #21 on: April 02, 2009, 06:14:12 AM »

We should rename The Imperial March from Star Wars as The March of the Critical Thinkers.
LOL  Grin Cheesy
Logged

Cool-Born a Yankee, but a Rebel by choice- Cool
                      -Brooke-

My blog: http://stitchesofthepast.blogspot.com/
My Etsy Shop:  www.stitchesofthepast.etsy.com
southerngal
Guest
« Reply #22 on: April 02, 2009, 11:09:02 AM »

Until the U.S. Civil War, members of the upper classes shunned the legume, considering it food fit only for slaves and the poor. Peanut consumption was largely relegated to people of the lower classes, who bought them from vendors and consumed them at fairs and circuses and on urban street corners. The entire practice of cracking open the pods, chewing the nuts, and tossing the empty shells on the ground gave the peanut an unrefined air. However, peanut consumption continued to spread, and farmers around the country began to experiment with growing the crop. Peanuts became more widely consumed during the Civil War, when both Union and Confederate soldiers valued them for their nourishing qualities. In addition to raw, roasted, and boiled, they enjoyed the peanut in various other forms including pies or peanut coffee.

Northern and southern troops alike brought their newfound affinity for peanuts home with them after the war, and the nut's popularity surged.

Source:  Encyclopedia of Alabama

Marige
Logged
vmescher
Senior Research
Veteran Scribbler
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 703


« Reply #23 on: April 02, 2009, 11:46:35 AM »

Until the U.S. Civil War, members of the upper classes shunned the legume, considering it food fit only for slaves and the poor. Peanut consumption was largely relegated to people of the lower classes, who bought them from vendors and consumed them at fairs and circuses and on urban street corners. The entire practice of cracking open the pods, chewing the nuts, and tossing the empty shells on the ground gave the peanut an unrefined air. However, peanut consumption continued to spread, and farmers around the country began to experiment with growing the crop. Peanuts became more widely consumed during the Civil War, when both Union and Confederate soldiers valued them for their nourishing qualities. In addition to raw, roasted, and boiled, they enjoyed the peanut in various other forms including pies or peanut coffee.

Northern and southern troops alike brought their newfound affinity for peanuts home with them after the war, and the nut's popularity surged.

Source:  Encyclopedia of Alabama

Marige

This secondary source was discussed on another forum recently and many of the statements were disproved.  Particularly the boiled peanuts statement was refuted by a number of people since there were no primary sources found for boiled peanuts before the late 19th century.

I disagree with the statement that peanuts were consumed by only lower class people.  While peanuts were originally brought to America by slaves and they were originally slave food, they did become popular as a street food and snack food.  They were also fed to livestock.  BUT you also peanuts in a number of cookbooks as an ingredient in cookies, soups, (I can give you more examples when I get home after this weekend).  The authors of the cookbooks (Sarah Rutledge - Carolina Housewife, and Eliza Leslie - Directions in Cookery) that I remember were writing these recipes for lower classes.  There are others but I'm not at my home computer right now.   

Then during the war they were used for their oil, a substitute for coffee, chocolate, and a candy.  Parthenia Hague talked about using peanuts and her family from Alabama was not lower class.  Francis Porcher, author of Resources of Southern Fields and Forests  wrote about peanuts being used as oil, and substitutes for coffee. chocolate and oil.  Granted this was not the norm but the nut was not looked down upon by either of these authors.  In the numerous primary references to using peanuts during the war, I've not run across a single one that mentioned that the peanut was only fit for the masses and something that they wouldn't eat in normal times. 

Of course, I've not read everything and would welcome anyone to post any primary sources that they have found.  I'd love to add any other primary references to my files on peanuts. 
Logged

Virginia Mescher
Please Visit us at
Ragged Soldier Sutlery or Vintage Volumes at
www.raggedsoldier.com
southerngal
Guest
« Reply #24 on: April 02, 2009, 01:46:16 PM »

Until the U.S. Civil War, members of the upper classes shunned the legume, considering it food fit only for slaves and the poor. Peanut consumption was largely relegated to people of the lower classes, who bought them from vendors and consumed them at fairs and circuses and on urban street corners. The entire practice of cracking open the pods, chewing the nuts, and tossing the empty shells on the ground gave the peanut an unrefined air. However, peanut consumption continued to spread, and farmers around the country began to experiment with growing the crop. Peanuts became more widely consumed during the Civil War, when both Union and Confederate soldiers valued them for their nourishing qualities. In addition to raw, roasted, and boiled, they enjoyed the peanut in various other forms including pies or peanut coffee.

Northern and southern troops alike brought their newfound affinity for peanuts home with them after the war, and the nut's popularity surged.

Source:  Encyclopedia of Alabama

Marige

This secondary source was discussed on another forum recently and many of the statements were disproved.  Particularly the boiled peanuts statement was refuted by a number of people since there were no primary sources found for boiled peanuts before the late 19th century.

I disagree with the statement that peanuts were consumed by only lower class people.  While peanuts were originally brought to America by slaves and they were originally slave food, they did become popular as a street food and snack food.  They were also fed to livestock.  BUT you also peanuts in a number of cookbooks as an ingredient in cookies, soups, (I can give you more examples when I get home after this weekend).  The authors of the cookbooks (Sarah Rutledge - Carolina Housewife, and Eliza Leslie - Directions in Cookery) that I remember were writing these recipes for lower classes.  There are others but I'm not at my home computer right now.   

Then during the war they were used for their oil, a substitute for coffee, chocolate, and a candy.  Parthenia Hague talked about using peanuts and her family from Alabama was not lower class.  Francis Porcher, author of Resources of Southern Fields and Forests  wrote about peanuts being used as oil, and substitutes for coffee. chocolate and oil.  Granted this was not the norm but the nut was not looked down upon by either of these authors.  In the numerous primary references to using peanuts during the war, I've not run across a single one that mentioned that the peanut was only fit for the masses and something that they wouldn't eat in normal times. 

Of course, I've not read everything and would welcome anyone to post any primary sources that they have found.  I'd love to add any other primary references to my files on peanuts. 


I should have included the link to the article since I only used an excerpt.  You may read the entire artilce at
http://encyclopediaofalabama.org/face/Article.jsp?id=h-2016

The article was written by
Rob Dixon
University of Alabama

He also lists as additional resources:

Hines, Linda O. "George W. Carver and the Tuskegee Agricultural Experiment Station." Agricultural History 53 (January 1979): 71-83.

Lanham, Ben T., Jr., J. H. Yeager, and Ben F. Alford. Alabama Agriculture, Its Characteristics and Farming Area. Auburn, Ala.: Agricultural Experiment Station of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1953.

Smith, Andrew F. Peanuts: The Illustrious History of the Goober Pea. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2002.


For a side note.  My family was one of the first families to  Barbour County Alabama.  Permelia was a teacher from Georgia and lived in Barbour County during the WBTS. 

My grandfather born 1881 in Barbour County Alabama raised peanuts and cotton in Geneva county Alabama.  He died 1979 but not before sharing his knowledge of the people and the place with me.
He personally knew in his lifetime his uncles and cousins who served in the Civil War and shared the stories they told him with me and others in our family.
Peanuts were ate by all walks of life the rich, poor and animals.  There is more than one kind of peanut like  there is corn.  Some were raised to eat and some to feed.

Margie
http://www.usgennet.org/usa/al/county/barbour/alcobarbour.htm
Logged
vmescher
Senior Research
Veteran Scribbler
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 703


« Reply #25 on: April 02, 2009, 05:54:03 PM »

This is Virginia's spouse posting again.  And I have registered for my own membership so I can stop using her login.

I went to the website with a youtube video on civil war cooking and watched all three videos. 

The food video was limited in what you could see because most of the cooking scenes were filmed too far from the cooking pot to see what was going on.  But what was visible raised numerous questions such as:

-  She was using one of the hollow "blowers" you get at fireplace shops (you are able to blow on specific parts of the fire) to help manage the fire.  I would think that device to be a modern creation.

-  in cooking her ham and apples, she fried what looked like water added ham in butter instead of frying dry cured ham in its natural fat.

-  another dish she cooked was bubble and squeak.  Has anyone seen bubble and squeak in a period cookbook?  [my note added later:  in conversations with Virginia later in the evening, she did inform me that bubble and squeak is a period dish -- but possibly not the way it is made in this video.  But it's hard to tell because the visual is almost a caricature and there isn't any narrative.]

-  She made the statement "cane sugar looks different from white sugar."  Cane sugar was white as well as many other tan or brown shades and various textures.

-  The scene of making bubble and squeak was accelerated in its visual and contained no narrative so you never found out what was going in the dish.  When the filming did slow down, there was one ingredient that looked very much like zuccini squash in the pot.  I didn't think they had that variety of squash in the US yet.  For what it is worth, Wikapedia says that zuccini was probably developed in the late nineteenth century in Italy.

-  The enameled pans mentioned in the post on laundry made a repeat appearance in this video as well.

And a note for anyone contemplating making a video like this.  Please get someone to care for your children while you are doing it.  The daughter (not quite three years old) was "helping" around the fire without shoes on.  I was afraid she would get close enough to ignite the entire time or step on an ember that had popped out of the fire.

My take on the video was that it is an interesting idea but it was chock full of inaccuracies.  Not that we all haven't made an inaccurate statement we wish we could get back but I wish they had done more research.

My only further comment on the laundry video is that it is so full of inaccuracies, I would not do laundry the way she demonstrates (you'd be exhausted after just a few shirts) and a lot of her "facts" are inaccurate.

And in a humorous note, the background music for the video on children's clothing is "The Rogue's March", a tune played when a soldier was being drummed out of the service or otherwise being punished for a transgression.

Michael Mescher

« Last Edit: April 02, 2009, 06:55:51 PM by vmescher » Logged

Virginia Mescher
Please Visit us at
Ragged Soldier Sutlery or Vintage Volumes at
www.raggedsoldier.com
LissaWilson
Guest
« Reply #26 on: April 02, 2009, 06:19:27 PM »

Could you be more specific about what is wrong with her laundry technique for those of us who are newer to doing laundry? I recognized a lot of the problems with her facts, and the obvious inaccuracies in equipment, but I guess I am not understanding the proper technique for doing the actual wash? Huh

ETA: Her children's clothing presentation has many errors too, not the least of which is starting with the wrong shapes to begin with, especially on the daughter's dress. (Although I must say it was much easier to spot the inaccuracies in that video, so I must need to study up on laundry again Undecided)
« Last Edit: April 02, 2009, 06:47:59 PM by LissaWilson » Logged
vmescher
Senior Research
Veteran Scribbler
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 703


« Reply #27 on: April 02, 2009, 07:26:08 PM »

Looking at the laundry video, here are some things I picked up:

-  Laundry was done every two weeks.  Laundry was done when you needed clean clothes.  Some lower class individuals had to do laundry every week while others could wait longer.

-  It is a very expensive process.  While doing a period impression can be a bit pricey to get the equipment, poor women made money by doing laundry.  They wouldn't have done that labor intensive activity if it was expensive.

-  Laundry requires lots of water.  Yes it does but it will take more than a coffeepot that she holds up to transport the water without spending all your time hauling water.

-  a soldier was designated a "washman."  In _Hardtack and Coffee", the author says that one man often would become the laundry cleaner for a group but it was a designation.  It was his choice and he was compensated for his efforts. 

-  The captain's wife might be a laundress.  I would expect the captain's wife would hire a laundress.

-  They didn't have liquid soap.  While they didn't have liquid soap, they did have soft soap.  This was the type of soap you get if you use wood ash lye (posassium hydroxide) instead of the kind of lye you used to be able to get in stores (sodium hydroxide).

-  She was using enameled steel dishpans for her laundry tubs.  They are the wrong material and way too small.

-  Did she really have to rub the shirt in the dirt on camera to get a dirty garment to wash?

-  She is correct that you want the wash tubs off the ground.  But you use a laundry bench and not a high table (probably about three feet off the ground). 

-  In scrubbing, you don't hold the scrub board with one hand and push the garment against it with the other.  This is a manuver known as counterforce and it is very tiring.  As I said in my shorter post, she would have been worn out after the first few shirts.  The position to do laundry is to put the scrub board leaning against the side of the tub and butted into your waist.  You bend over it and scrub on the down stroke (using both hands) and don't push hard against the board on the upstoke.  And be careful you don't let your knuckles wrap around the bottom of the garment or you'll take some of your hide off.

-  She seemed to be doing a lot of rinsing in cold water.  To get the residual soap in solution and out of the garment, hot water will do the job better.

-  She called bluing a dye.  It isn't.  And I wished she had shown using powdered or solid bluing.

-  She limited starch to corn or potato starch.  Starch could also be made from rice, wheat, or other plant materials.

-  You need 12 irons and it takes an iron 2 hours to heat.  Virginia's _Laundry Handbook_ mentions that 4 irons was a normal number (based on inventories).  I don't think it would take 2 hours to heat.

And this isn't about the laundry but the woman doing the narration appears in a dress without a collar but she is "being proper" and wearing a frilly day cap to do laundry and cook. 

That is what I picked up and I haven't studied laundry that much.  Someone more knowledgeable about period laundry would probably pick up more.

Michael Mescher

Logged

Virginia Mescher
Please Visit us at
Ragged Soldier Sutlery or Vintage Volumes at
www.raggedsoldier.com
LissaWilson
Guest
« Reply #28 on: April 02, 2009, 07:32:40 PM »

Thank you so much for your detailed reply! I didn't know about the counterforce, I'll have to practice the method you described. I need to review my ironing sources. I did find one source that suggested heavier irons could take up to an hour and a half to heat, but that may have been a secondary source, and they may have been referring to a tailor's iron. I'll have to go back and check their sources. In practice, our smaller irons usually take no more than 20 minutes to get hot on the stove. Any other laundresses have comments?
Logged
vmescher
Senior Research
Veteran Scribbler
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 703


« Reply #29 on: April 02, 2009, 07:50:46 PM »



I should have included the link to the article since I only used an excerpt.  You may read the entire artilce at
http://encyclopediaofalabama.org/face/Article.jsp?id=h-2016

The article was written by
Rob Dixon
University of Alabama

He also lists as additional resources:

Hines, Linda O. "George W. Carver and the Tuskegee Agricultural Experiment Station." Agricultural History 53 (January 1979): 71-83.

Lanham, Ben T., Jr., J. H. Yeager, and Ben F. Alford. Alabama Agriculture, Its Characteristics and Farming Area. Auburn, Ala.: Agricultural Experiment Station of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1953.

Smith, Andrew F. Peanuts: The Illustrious History of the Goober Pea. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2002.


There is more than one kind of peanut like  there is corn.  Some were raised to eat and some to feed.

Margie
http://www.usgennet.org/usa/al/county/barbour/alcobarbour.htm
Quote

Thank you for providing the link. 

I am aware of the entire article and have read it on the internet in response to replies on another forum.  The sources listed are secondary ones and with the exception of Andrew Smith's book, I could not find any primary sources quoted in those secondary sources. 

The work that George Washington Carver did was done mostly after the turn of the 20th century and I've read some of Carver's reports to the Agriculture Dept. but I can't recall the exact date. 

I realize that there are various varieties of peanuts grown today which are grown for different purposes.  I can check my files when I get home and provide additional information as to the varieties grown and the dates for those publications if there is interest.  I apologize for not being about to provide all the details right now but I'll be glad to do so as soon as I get home.  Just let me know if there is interest. 



 
Logged

Virginia Mescher
Please Visit us at
Ragged Soldier Sutlery or Vintage Volumes at
www.raggedsoldier.com
NoahBriggs
Guest
« Reply #30 on: April 02, 2009, 07:55:16 PM »

Karin Timour wrote up a little article on Army laundresses for Winter of 64.  They were official government contractors, entitled to pay and one daily ration.  They were not necessarily "the captain's wife".  They also mended - all those bitty tailoring jobs us boys can't or won't do.  Those are the few things I remember, besides the fact most laundresses were married and required an officer or NCO escort when out and about.

Back to cold lunches.  Anyone hungry?
Logged
Beth Chamberlain
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1255



WWW
« Reply #31 on: April 02, 2009, 08:15:12 PM »

Just a little more laundry hijack.
Michael Mescher already listed pretty much everything I noticed, just a wee bit more to add. All of the bluing references I have seen referred to a dry form, tied into a muslin bag called a bluing bag. And, starch does not melt (nothing to do with historical accuracy, it just bothered me), starched mixed in water is simply in suspension until it meets adequate heat to cause chemical reactions. I'll spare everyone the chemical mumbo jumbo. Has anyone ever seen a reference for "blue monday"? I haven't so I did do a quick check in several archives to see if I had missed it but came up empty.

Back to lunch....
I often get the best responses from the most simple stuff. Home baked bread, period receipts, is always a huge hit. As an alternate to lemonade try gingerade, ginger syrup and water. It is quite refreshing and if it's hot and anyone has issues with the heat it is very good for queasy stomachs.

Beth
Logged

Men are made in the image of God. Gentlemen are manufactured by tailors,  barbers, and bootblacks. Woman is the last and most perfect work of God. Ladies are the productions of silk-worms, milliners
southerngal
Guest
« Reply #32 on: April 02, 2009, 08:39:40 PM »

This is Virginia's spouse posting again.  And I have registered for my own membership so I can stop using her login.

I went to the website with a youtube video on civil war cooking and watched all three videos. 

The food video was limited in what you could see because most of the cooking scenes were filmed too far from the cooking pot to see what was going on.  But what was visible raised numerous questions such as:

-  She was using one of the hollow "blowers" you get at fireplace shops (you are able to blow on specific parts of the fire) to help manage the fire.  I would think that device to be a modern creation.

-  in cooking her ham and apples, she fried what looked like water added ham in butter instead of frying dry cured ham in its natural fat.

-  another dish she cooked was bubble and squeak.  Has anyone seen bubble and squeak in a period cookbook?  [my note added later:  in conversations with Virginia later in the evening, she did inform me that bubble and squeak is a period dish -- but possibly not the way it is made in this video.  But it's hard to tell because the visual is almost a caricature and there isn't any narrative.]

-  She made the statement "cane sugar looks different from white sugar."  Cane sugar was white as well as many other tan or brown shades and various textures.

-  The scene of making bubble and squeak was accelerated in its visual and contained no narrative so you never found out what was going in the dish.  When the filming did slow down, there was one ingredient that looked very much like zuccini squash in the pot.  I didn't think they had that variety of squash in the US yet.  For what it is worth, Wikapedia says that zuccini was probably developed in the late nineteenth century in Italy.

-  The enameled pans mentioned in the post on laundry made a repeat appearance in this video as well.

And a note for anyone contemplating making a video like this.  Please get someone to care for your children while you are doing it.  The daughter (not quite three years old) was "helping" around the fire without shoes on.  I was afraid she would get close enough to ignite the entire time or step on an ember that had popped out of the fire.

My take on the video was that it is an interesting idea but it was chock full of inaccuracies.  Not that we all haven't made an inaccurate statement we wish we could get back but I wish they had done more research.

My only further comment on the laundry video is that it is so full of inaccuracies, I would not do laundry the way she demonstrates (you'd be exhausted after just a few shirts) and a lot of her "facts" are inaccurate.

And in a humorous note, the background music for the video on children's clothing is "The Rogue's March", a tune played when a soldier was being drummed out of the service or otherwise being punished for a transgression.

Michael Mescher




My interest in sending the youtube video's was to illustrate how a video could help new people with their choice of persona.

I would love to have some of "this wonderful, historically acccurate" history revisited players make a historically accurate video on cooking, washing, sewing and all other events that need to be done correctly at events.

I just bet every teacher in this country would love it too. <G>.

I took my grandchildren to Plimouth last summer and they loved it.  They were thrilled to meet one of our ancestors Samuel Fuller the lessor.

Margie
Logged
betsyurven
Guest
« Reply #33 on: April 03, 2009, 10:05:50 AM »

Back to peanuts, can we have them at our 1860s base ball games in WI?  If we can should they still be in the shells?  Thanks.

Betsy
Logged
bevinmacrae
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3087


« Reply #34 on: April 03, 2009, 10:22:54 AM »

I agree Margie. It seems that there is not any historically accurate information on YouTube, at least from what I've seen. Perhaps a future project for some AGSAS members would be to put up a few videos of the correct ways to

Dress from the inside out
do laundry
children's clothing
do hair
and while we're on the subject, do a cold lunch!!

Check out Noah's correct way to pack a care package to a solider: that's a good start!
Bevin
Logged

Bevin MacRae

"Inspiring excitement and curiosity about the past!"
www.gcv.org
LissaWilson
Guest
« Reply #35 on: April 03, 2009, 03:17:28 PM »

RE: Blue Monday (I figure it is my thread so I can hijack as much as I want Grin)

I think I know her source of info about this term, but IIRC the comment was made in a secondary source by a historian, so I'd have to go back and investigate the documentation behind it. I'm not at home right now, so I'll look it up and get back to you when I can get into my files.
Logged
Chip
Dedicated Scribbler
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 332



« Reply #36 on: April 04, 2009, 06:10:49 AM »


I disagree with the statement that peanuts were consumed by only lower class people.  While peanuts were originally brought to America by slaves and they were originally slave food, they did become popular as a street food and snack food.  They were also fed to livestock.  BUT you also peanuts in a number of cookbooks as an ingredient in cookies, soups, (I can give you more examples when I get home after this weekend).  The authors of the cookbooks (Sarah Rutledge - Carolina Housewife, and Eliza Leslie - Directions in Cookery) that I remember were writing these recipes for lower classes. 


We have made the 'Groundnut Cake' from the, "Carolina Housewife."

I would have to question about this being strictly a slave recipe since it used a fair amount of sugar. (Sugar being a more costly/valuable commodity)

Of course, house slaves, both servants and cooks of the wealthy in this region of the South sometimes had better diets than the free lower classes, both white and black.

Also, the recipes of field slaves were seldom written down.
Logged
vmescher
Senior Research
Veteran Scribbler
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 703


« Reply #37 on: April 04, 2009, 08:27:32 AM »


I disagree with the statement that peanuts were consumed by only lower class people.  While peanuts were originally brought to America by slaves and they were originally slave food, they did become popular as a street food and snack food.  They were also fed to livestock.  BUT you also peanuts in a number of cookbooks as an ingredient in cookies, soups, (I can give you more examples when I get home after this weekend).  The authors of the cookbooks (Sarah Rutledge - Carolina Housewife, and Eliza Leslie - Directions in Cookery) that I remember were writing these recipes for lower classes. 


We have made the 'Groundnut Cake' from the, "Carolina Housewife."

I would have to question about this being strictly a slave recipe since it used a fair amount of sugar. (Sugar being a more costly/valuable commodity)

Of course, house slaves, both servants and cooks of the wealthy in this region of the South sometimes had better diets than the free lower classes, both white and black.

Also, the recipes of field slaves were seldom written down.

I didn't read my post very carefully.  I meant to say that the books that I mentioned were NOT written for the lower classes.  I apologize for the confusion.  I've been working from my laptop with no computer glasses but I should have read over my typing more carefully.
Logged

Virginia Mescher
Please Visit us at
Ragged Soldier Sutlery or Vintage Volumes at
www.raggedsoldier.com
southerngal
Guest
« Reply #38 on: April 04, 2009, 01:15:39 PM »

I agree Margie. It seems that there is not any historically accurate information on YouTube, at least from what I've seen. Perhaps a future project for some AGSAS members would be to put up a few videos of the correct ways to

Dress from the inside out
do laundry
children's clothing
do hair
and while we're on the subject, do a cold lunch!!

Check out Noah's correct way to pack a care package to a solider: that's a good start!
Bevin

I searched the threads for Noah's correct way to pack a care package but could not find  it.

Would you please share how to find the information?

Margie
Logged
vmescher
Senior Research
Veteran Scribbler
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 703


« Reply #39 on: April 04, 2009, 01:27:44 PM »

Also check our website ( www.raggedsoldier.com ) in the menu item "Articles:  Virginia's Veranda".  Go to the archived articles and read the article "Packages from Home" which discusses not only contents but also provides some good dimensions for a typical box.

Michael Mescher
Logged

Virginia Mescher
Please Visit us at
Ragged Soldier Sutlery or Vintage Volumes at
www.raggedsoldier.com
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 6   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines