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Nona Nelson
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« on: August 27, 2008, 08:50:11 PM »

Wasn't quite sure where to put this....

When I was at the Athenaeum, we had a Needlework class and made preforated paper bookmarks. They where alot of fun to make and pretty simple. I'd like to make some more! They are just so sweet and danity! Here is mine:



I was just looking over at Sarah Elizabeth Craft's needlework bookmarks on the Whitaker Auction site. They are really simple design, though not on peferated paper. I was curious about them through; I have never really have seen period bookmarks before (I knew they exsited!) and I noticed that most have ribbons on them as wide as the bookmark itself. I really want to see the back of these, but I am wondering if the back is covered by a full peice of ribbon to cover up the back or is it just two peices, one on each end? I can see two stiching lines on the one that says "Love" on either end, but I am not sure.



Also, I was wondering about mine I made; the back of it is felted wool; has anyone seen peiod ones with felted wool backs?

Oh, I know it has to exsist somewhere, but where would one buy peforated paper? I know JoAnns doesn't see it.
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Elaine Kessinger
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« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2008, 09:28:10 PM »

I'm assuming you have tried the "embriodery/craft" section and the "utility fabrics" section of JoAnn (they like to hide things like that for some reason)? Have you tried Michaels, Hobby Lobby, A.C. Moore... they all have "needlework craft" sections.
I'm sure I'm pointing out the obvious, but I sometimes miss the obvious.
-Elaine
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Colleen
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« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2008, 10:04:27 PM »

These are fun and easy to do.  Are you a member of the cwneedleworkers group? We've had a discussion on there about these, and you can search for information there.  Let me quote a bit:

from Virginia Mescher:

"Perforated card word shows up in needlework books as early as the 1842.

The following is from an 1842 needlework book but I don't know which
one. I didn't have it in my notes. "The paper used was a card with
minute holes at regular distances... It is of various degrees of fineness
and can be purchased in whole sheets or parts of sheets. It is used for
many ornamental articles, and it is easy to work on, and when nicely done,
it nearly equal to fine canvas work. It is very nice for children to
employ themselves on. Beautiful bookmarkers, portfolios, needle-books,
etc. can be made from it. The pieces for bookmarkers, sides of baskets,
etc. can be obtained with borders. Be careful in working that the needles
are not too large, or the holes will be broken through. The small patterns
must be worked with silk, the larger can be done in wool, or silk and wool.....
Mottoes and designs can also be worked in gold, silver, steel or colored
beads.
The printed Berlin patterns are also guides for cardboard work."

It is mentioned in _The Seamstress_ (1843) "Mosaic Work and Perforated
Card. These are used for note-books, ornamental card-cases, hand-screens,
bookmarks, and a variety of other purposes."

By the mid- 1850s Godey's was calling for perforated card-board in projects
and for embroidered book marks. It was used to make baskets, boxes, other
art projects. The larger mottoes were more popular in the 1870s and 80s.

I have a small collection but I don't have pictures of them. Here are some
examples of bookmarks that are online.
http://www.lakeshoreguardian.com/_2006/042006/antiques.php "


There was much more discussed on the group as well.

To answer a couple of your questions...regarding the ribbon backing...it is one piece, that the perforated paper is attached to.  It covers the entire back of the bookmark.  I personally have never seen one with a felt backing, but only with the ribbon, or nothing at all.  Carolann has a nice collection of these, and maybe she can give you more info.

Is the second picture you posted from the Whitaker auction site? If so, those are perforated paper...Some appear to be done with Berlin wools, which was common.  I have one that is exactly like the one with "Drink Ye All of It" on it

The good perforated paper is hard to find.  During the 19th century, it came in a variety of colors and sizes, but today, although we can get some of the different colors, we can only find it in 14 count, and most of the period paper was smaller than that.  Here is a site that sells a variety of colors: http://yarntree.com/cross-stitch/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=81&zenid=61d207dc74d2c88159943c064a9054f2  The good stuff is almost like canvas, in that you can actually roll it somewhat as you are working with it.

Hope that helps some.

Colleen Formby
« Last Edit: August 27, 2008, 10:12:31 PM by Colleen » Logged

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Carolann Schmitt
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« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2008, 06:25:06 AM »

What Colleen said. The ribbon backing is the most common and it does cover the full length of the bookmark. I've seen a handful backed with wool. When I first saw one several decades ago I assumed it was wool felt; it was wool broadcloth - the same wonderful stuff used to make men's frock coats.

There is another variation of punched paper book mark that doesn't involve embroidery. Instead the designs are cut into the paper. Carol Garratano is teaching a workshop on it at next year's Conference; there are photos of one of the designs on our web site www.genteelarts.com  Click on the link for the Conference information.

Regards,
Carolann
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« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2008, 11:19:09 AM »

Nona- There is a wonderful book called"On Women and Friendship" by Starr Ockenga. This book contains  many photos of Victorian keepsakes. It is well worth the investment. The book as several pages of perforated paper work, including cut with silk backings and embriodery book marks. The photos are detailed enough that you can easily copy the designs.The book also covers many of the same type items that were at the Athenaeum classes.
          In regards to the paper, the limited size that is available today can make the  period design to wide for a bookmark. (A mistake I made)
By the way, I really enjoyed the pics from the Anthenaeum.    Stephanie
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« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2008, 12:46:39 PM »

Nona,

I love your bookmark.  You did a great job.  If you want to try to find some perforated paper to make more, the places mentioned above are good starts.  If you can't find anything there, you can try a couple of sites that I use for needlework stuff - www.stitchesnthings.com and www.nordicneedle.com.  Be careful though, both sites can be very addicting!   Wink
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Nona Nelson
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« Reply #6 on: August 28, 2008, 02:55:10 PM »

Thanks Everyone! I shall check out the Yahoo Needleworker's group and find that book! I did see it on e-bay or anywhere else, but I  can probaby get it on ILL.
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« Reply #7 on: August 28, 2008, 05:57:45 PM »

For an extreme use of perforated paper, there is even a bookmark design in Godey's or Peterson's (I'll have to look to find the issue) that makes a cross out of stacked perforated paper that gets wider with each layer.  The result is kind of like the hobo art boxes (way after our period) made of saw-toothed sticks that are stacked together.

After the cross is completed, a ribbon is attached to the cross piece and the hanging down ribbon is the functional bookmark.

Michael Mescher
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Nona Nelson
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« Reply #8 on: August 28, 2008, 08:44:33 PM »

For an extreme use of perforated paper, there is even a bookmark design in Godey's or Peterson's (I'll have to look to find the issue) that makes a cross out of stacked perforated paper that gets wider with each layer.  The result is kind of like the hobo art boxes (way after our period) made of saw-toothed sticks that are stacked together.

After the cross is completed, a ribbon is attached to the cross piece and the hanging down ribbon is the functional bookmark.

Michael Mescher

Oh, that sounds very neat Michael! I'd love to see that if you are able to find it!
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Eileen Hook
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« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2008, 10:34:59 AM »

Oooo,  see a potential sales item for Trader's Faire in 2009! Probably not silk ribbon backing though - not cost effective.
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« Reply #10 on: August 29, 2008, 07:07:14 PM »

I found the reference for the perforated paper cross bookmark but haven't had time to scan the image.  The directions (and a picture) can be found in the September 1862 Godey's.  The directions I have also mention that, for variety, you could make a celtic cross as well but I don't know if that was from some other source.

Michael Mescher
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Nona Nelson
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« Reply #11 on: September 01, 2008, 07:26:57 PM »

I found the reference for the perforated paper cross bookmark but haven't had time to scan the image.  The directions (and a picture) can be found in the September 1862 Godey's.  The directions I have also mention that, for variety, you could make a celtic cross as well but I don't know if that was from some other source.

Michael Mescher

Cool! I don't know if I'll be able to find it myself, but I shall try!
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