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Author Topic: Rags, and Towels  (Read 3261 times)
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BarbaraSmith
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« Reply #20 on: March 10, 2011, 06:27:43 PM »

I think Huck and Huckabuck are the same thing. At different periods they were linen, linen-cotton blend, or just cotton.

I do not think it was a definite progression like I'm writing it, however. I do think there was linen around simultaneously with the cotton.

This is just from my wanderings and experience, nothing I can read and point to.  Roll Eyes

Cotton huck toweling at JoAnn's is still a great find. Fabulous for camp use. I remember when I got on a "period bath towel" kick, for those events where we get WET (swimming, sweat lodge, etc.) and I didn't want to be the farb with the modern towel. I still have a tote box full of cotton and linen towels - some modern huck that I cut and hemmed, some modern linen towels that were too cheap to pass up, and some antiques.

Drying your entirely wet body and hair with a cotton or linen towel that is not terrycloth is so unsatifsying.  Cheesy No wonder girls couldn't go out because they'd just washed their hair!  Cheesy

LOL,
B.
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Auntie B says: "I may look like Aunt Pitty-Pat, but I have the soul of Belle Watling," and "Since I can't be a good example, then I'm just gonna have to be a horrible warning."
Jennifer Hill
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« Reply #21 on: March 28, 2011, 09:45:09 PM »

You know, I find modern bath towels to be horrible ... unabsorbent.

But, try a huck weave or a waffle weave, in an absorbent fiber, & the *should* be great.  I wonder why you had that experience. 

Might the threads have been waxed?  How many times had the towels been washed, prior to your use?

This is important to me as I want to weave some cotton/linen bath sheets & I want those buggers to WORK!  Jennifer
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Jennifer Hill
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Joanna Jones
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« Reply #22 on: March 29, 2011, 07:04:06 AM »

Well, after washing them they seem much more absorbent than before washing them - and they certainly mop up blood well - as I found out last year when the center beam of the canopy we were sitting under fell in the wind and bashed my friend in the head. 

She was fine after a few stitches.  Undecided

I threw the cloths away.  Cry
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kabrilew
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« Reply #23 on: February 11, 2012, 12:14:37 PM »

Joann, blood can be gotten out of fabric with a little Formula 409.... obviously not period correct except for our current modern lives.... but useful for future reference.

I have purchased from JoAnn's Fabrics what is labeled as 100% Cotton HuckTowel. As it happens it is only 16" wide. I intend to portray Civil War period predominantly. Should towels still be the aforementioned yard long (which I'd also discovered in the same source) since this fabric isn't anywhere close to 11-12 nails wide (24.75"-27"). I will also be using this toweling in my modern kitchen, mostly when baking bread, making sauerkraut, canning & other such not quite so modern processes (I mean really, not many folks make vinegar or sauerkraut anymore, right? I have & intend to)..... So I want these to be practical on both levels IF at all possible.

Any advise will be appreciated. And I do look for period sources, most all of which were either prior to or post period correct for the era I intend to portray.....

Thanks all.... I am learning so much from everyone.....
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Mrs. G.W. Spring
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« Reply #24 on: February 11, 2012, 10:01:05 PM »

The Lowell Mill sells towelling that is made on the machines and is 100% cotton.  It was $1 per yard when I got it in their gift shop several years ago.  Their gift shop isn't online, but I bet one could call and purchase some over the phone. 
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Sue Leurgans
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« Reply #25 on: February 12, 2012, 06:59:36 AM »

The Lowell Mill as in Lowell Massachusetts? 
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Sue Leurgans
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Beth Chamberlain
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« Reply #26 on: February 12, 2012, 09:15:17 AM »

Boott Cotton Mill (NPS) in Lowell sells toweling they weave. Last I was up there is was $2 or $2.50. I've asked the rangers what they do with the other fabrics they weave but no one seems to know  Huh

Beth
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« Reply #27 on: February 12, 2012, 11:34:32 AM »

Sue, yes the Lowell Mill in Lowell, MA.  It is run by the NPS and they have 2 stores there.  I visited it as part of the ALFAM Conference several years ago.  I bought lots of the towelling because it was so neat - the weave was not something I had seen on any fabric.  I know it was 100% cotton.  I checked on-line but they don't have anything listed.  I bet you could call and then purchase over the phone.  I hope this helps. 
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