Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5] 6   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Sun bonnets  (Read 29088 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Ginger Lane
Veteran Scribbler
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 600



WWW
« Reply #80 on: March 27, 2007, 11:12:08 AM »

One thing I did get at Hancock's was about five yards of a lightweight blue and white stripe.  It's definitely semi-sheer; the weave is a little open but the threads aren't terribly fine, so it's sturdy.  The stripe design is slightly reminiscent of ticking, but it's certainly not supposed to look like it.

Sounds like good sunbonnet material to me!  Is there a particular way stripes are supposed to go?  Which way around the brim, and how about the curtain? Ties?
Logged

Anna Worden Bauersmith
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3610



WWW
« Reply #81 on: March 28, 2007, 04:44:56 AM »

Here is the fabric I am considering.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v95/Deliagodric/swatch.jpg

Anna
Logged

Anna Worden Bauersmith
http://annaworden.wordpress.com/
Straw & Winter Millinery - Available on Etsy
Fanciful Utility: Victorian Sewing Cases & Needle-books
From Field to Fashion: The Straw Bonnet
Micaila
Dedicated Scribbler
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 469



« Reply #82 on: March 28, 2007, 03:55:06 PM »

This is sort of OT but I am cording the brim of a sun bonnet right now and am having issues w/ the fabric distributing unevenly. I am sandwiching the cording between the two layers and sewing the cording into the channels as I go, but I seem to be puling more fabric from the bottom then the top. This is causing the bottom layer lose fabric faster than the top causing it to bow funny on the raw edge.
This is soo hard to explain, does anyone understand what I mean?
Has anyone else had this problem, and is there any way to prevent this?

Micaila
Who is so very frustrated.
Logged

Glenna Jo Christen
Guest
« Reply #83 on: March 28, 2007, 04:09:41 PM »

... I am cording the brim of a sun bonnet right now ... I am sandwiching the cording between the two layers and sewing the cording into the channels as I go, but I seem to be pulling more fabric from the bottom then the top. This is causing the bottom layer lose fabric faster than the top causing it to bow funny on the raw edge...

I know exactly what you mean. Are you sewing it by machine or by hand? That may be a silly question as most people aren't wild about hand sewing, but I prefer it.
It is easier to control your fabric when sewing by hand, but with some care it will work with machine sewing as well. It just requires very careful arrangement of your layers and the cord as you sew. I could show you in a few seconds, but I will try to explain it in words....

First be sure you are using a zipper foot attachment. Lay your cord between your layers and press it in close to the existing seam. Then, instead of laying it on your sewing machine and running the seam you need to pull the top layer tighter, rolling the cord up slightly next to the presser foot to balance out the two layers. Doing this will center the seam between the two layers and minimize or prevent the fabric "creep" you are experiencing.

If that is as clear as mud, let me know and I will try to explain it better.

Glenna Jo
Logged
Micaila
Dedicated Scribbler
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 469



« Reply #84 on: March 28, 2007, 04:21:05 PM »

Thanks Glenna Jo.

I'm actually doing this by hand, but I think I'm just not holding it right. It's mostly pulling at the middle and it's only a 1/4 inch discrepancy so far. I've done 14 rows and have 7 or so more to go, so as long as I don't lose any more I should be okay. I hope.
 I might be better off using the machine but since I started with hand sewing I should finish this one that way. This is my test version and will be my dirty-work bonnet anyway.

Glad to know I'm not the only one.

Micaila
Logged

Elizabeth
Administrator
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7894


WWW
« Reply #85 on: March 28, 2007, 04:56:59 PM »

If you were working by machine, I'd suspect "feed dog creep"--the layer next to the little ridged advancey-footie-thingummies on the base plate pull the fabric through, and can advance the bottom faster than the top.  Ideal if you're trying to ease something in, but a bit of a pill when you don't want that.

Working by hand, my suspicion is that you're cupping the fabric a bit when you stitch.  Doing it on a lapel (as illustrated in the tailoring threads in the gentlemen's department) builds in a nifty curve, but doing it on a bonnet causes "issues." 

When you stitch, are you taking one stitch at a time, or loading several onto the needle before pulling through?
Logged

Regards,
Elizabeth
Glenna Jo Christen
Guest
« Reply #86 on: March 28, 2007, 05:37:04 PM »

These two bonnets are similar to what Glenna Jo writes about. The shape is very simple. The straw is nicely woven.
http://www.mfa.org/collections/search_art.asp?coll_keywords=shaker+bonnet

These are exactly the kind of Shaker bonnets I was referring to. I have one in natural straw and one in the dark pattern like the second. The latter in my collection is in really rough shape though.  Sad

Quote
This might be the closest to resembling the bonnet she talks about:
http://www.equinoxantiques.com/detail/SB104

This is a very elegant Shaker bonnet, not the deeper brim versions used for wearing to do routine outdoor chores etc. It is fabulous!

Quote
This example is more shaped than the ones Glenna Jo mentions. It is also made of plait rather than woven straw. http://www.strawartmuseum.org/hats_tour4.htm

I don't believe this is a Shaker bonnet at all, but a fashionable straw bonnet from the 1840s, sans the curtain, trim and ties. It is plaited, not woven and it has the fashionable shape of the period in which it was made, not the "sugar scoop" shape of a true Shaker bonnet.

Quote

These are, of course, all Shakers, some are sunbonnet versions and other are "Sunday go to Meeting" bonnets. It is nice to see so many different examples, all made the same way, some just shorter in the brim than others. They didn't change in any essential way throughout the entire time the Shakers were making them either. They are light and seemingly delicate, but surprisingly sturdy. How like the Shakers, eh?  Smiley

Thanks for finding all those wonderful examples Anna.

Glenna Jo
Logged
Glenna Jo Christen
Guest
« Reply #87 on: March 28, 2007, 05:48:16 PM »

One thing I did get at Hancock's was about five yards of a lightweight blue and white stripe.  It's definitely semi-sheer; the weave is a little open but the threads aren't terribly fine, so it's sturdy....
Sounds like good sunbonnet material to me!  Is there a particular way stripes are supposed to go?  Which way around the brim, and how about the curtain? Ties?

It sounds vaguely like the fabric in one of my originals! You Go Girl!  Cheesy
As for the direction of the stripe, if the stripes are lengthwise, the stripes should run parallel the front edge of the bonnet and the ties should definitely run the length of the fabric as well. As you have 5 yards, you can get at least 4 bonnets out of that if not 5 if you lay it out right. Smaller pieces make great kids sun bonnets too. Left overs always welcomed.  Roll Eyes  Cheesy

Glenna Jo
Logged
Micaila
Dedicated Scribbler
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 469



« Reply #88 on: March 28, 2007, 10:29:54 PM »

Thanks again Glenna Jo, and Elizabeth.

I think you're right I'm cupping the fabric. Also, I tried making my channels just a hair looser and that seems to help.
I don't know if this is right, or if they should be very tight against the cord, but it seems to work for me.

Thanks again Ladies,
Micaila
Logged

bevinmacrae
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3087


« Reply #89 on: March 29, 2007, 06:57:57 AM »

I found out the hard way that sewing the chords in with the machine wasn't going to work. I instead sewed all the channels on the machine and then inserted the cords later. It was difficult to get the chords in a first, but once i got the hang of it, it worked very nicely and the rows are very stright and neat.
~Bevin
Logged

Bevin MacRae

"Inspiring excitement and curiosity about the past!"
www.gcv.org
Glenna Jo Christen
Guest
« Reply #90 on: March 29, 2007, 01:58:54 PM »

Here is the fabric I am considering.

I just hope it is lighter weight than it appears on the screen, especially as it is a darker color. It may bee too heavy for a sun bonnet...
That is my main problem with buying fabric on line, without actually handling it. Even if the name of the fabric is given, I still like to see it in person and test the hand, etc...

Glenna Jo
Logged
Anna Worden Bauersmith
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3610



WWW
« Reply #91 on: March 30, 2007, 04:50:08 AM »

It is not as heavy as it looks but it is slightly heavier, thicker than a quilter's calico. It is more like a heavier homespun. Thinking weight might be a question, I pondered finding a scale in the science wing to weigh it when I had it here the other day. Wish I would have to give you a better idea.

Anna
Logged

Anna Worden Bauersmith
http://annaworden.wordpress.com/
Straw & Winter Millinery - Available on Etsy
Fanciful Utility: Victorian Sewing Cases & Needle-books
From Field to Fashion: The Straw Bonnet
Ginger Lane
Veteran Scribbler
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 600



WWW
« Reply #92 on: March 30, 2007, 09:26:21 AM »

One thing I did get at Hancock's was about five yards of a lightweight blue and white stripe.  It's definitely semi-sheer; the weave is a little open but the threads aren't terribly fine, so it's sturdy....
Sounds like good sunbonnet material to me!  Is there a particular way stripes are supposed to go?  Which way around the brim, and how about the curtain? Ties?

It sounds vaguely like the fabric in one of my originals! You Go Girl!  Cheesy
As for the direction of the stripe, if the stripes are lengthwise, the stripes should run parallel the front edge of the bonnet and the ties should definitely run the length of the fabric as well. As you have 5 yards, you can get at least 4 bonnets out of that if not 5 if you lay it out right. Smaller pieces make great kids sun bonnets too. Left overs always welcomed.  Roll Eyes  Cheesy

Glenna Jo

SCORE! for me!   Cheesy  No promises about when this'll be done, but I'm looking forward to it.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2007, 11:04:48 AM by Ginger Lane » Logged

BarbaraSmith
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6106

I'm clueless, but competitive! ~ Trish Roseburg


« Reply #93 on: March 30, 2007, 10:40:56 AM »


Just because I don't own anything "dimity" and I want to.  Grin I remember reading somewhere in a period novel about a dimity dress and it stuck.

LOL,
B.
Logged

Auntie B says: "I may look like Aunt Pitty-Pat, but I have the soul of Belle Watling," and "Since I can't be a good example, then I'm just gonna have to be a horrible warning."
Pam Robles
Guest
« Reply #94 on: March 30, 2007, 06:18:01 PM »

One thing I did get at Hancock's was about five yards of a lightweight blue and white stripe.  It's definitely semi-sheer; the weave is a little open but the threads aren't terribly fine, so it's sturdy....
Sounds like good sunbonnet material to me!  Is there a particular way stripes are supposed to go?  Which way around the brim, and how about the curtain? Ties?

It sounds vaguely like the fabric in one of my originals! You Go Girl!  Cheesy
Glenna Jo
Glenna Jo, could you post a piccie of said bonnet?  Pretty please?
Logged
Lisa Wintler-Cox
Guest
« Reply #95 on: March 31, 2007, 01:43:43 PM »

http://www.fashionfabricsclub.com/catalog_itemdetail.aspx?ItmID=AA272

Does this look like silk dimity? I'm not sure it's sheer enough. I've been looking at white shirting material...okay, actual shirts at Goodwill because I reckon that there's enough in a man's shirt to do a sunbonnet...and wonder if some of the white woven patterns would work as well?

Logged
Glenna Jo Christen
Guest
« Reply #96 on: March 31, 2007, 06:27:48 PM »

Glenna Jo, could you post a piccie of said bonnet?  Pretty please?

I sure will, but it may take a while. We are in Lansing, MI for the "Treasures of the Past" historic clothing display. (We have to get up at "O Dark 30" in order to get there in time to start setting up at 6:30 AM Shocked ) We will have our oldest (5 year old) grandson for a few days then Christine Ballard is coming to photograph our bonnet collection (she's working on a bonnet book for the Watchdog) with Saundra Altman (Past Patterns) coming after that. (check our eBay name, gwjchris in the near future, she wants us to sell some of her originals for her.)
Whew! I get tired just writing about our next week! It'll be fun though.

Glenna Jo
Logged
Pam Robles
Guest
« Reply #97 on: March 31, 2007, 06:30:43 PM »

Christine's original?  Bonnets?  If so, please don't list them all to end at the same time.  Kiss
Logged
Glenna Jo Christen
Guest
« Reply #98 on: March 31, 2007, 06:56:31 PM »

No, the originals are Saundra Altman's. She is weeding her collection of clothing. Christine is coming to photograph our bonnet collection. That said, I may be weeding my bonnet collection soon as I am running out of room for safely storing them. I will spread out the auctions in any case.  Cool

Glenna Jo
Logged
Pam Robles
Guest
« Reply #99 on: March 31, 2007, 06:59:21 PM »

Bless you, my child.  Smiley
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5] 6   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines