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BarbaraSmith
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« Reply #100 on: April 11, 2007, 05:07:49 PM »

Oooh! Pretty!!!

Splendid Victorian Girl's Whitework Embroid. Sun Bonnet - Item number: 250102685277

http://cgi.ebay.com/Splendid-Victorian-Girls-Whitework-Embroid-Sun-Bonnet_W0QQitemZ250102685277QQihZ015QQcategoryZ20291QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

or

http://tinyurl.com/2craan

Mamma? May I put pretty lace on  MY sunbonnet, too? Or do just the little girls get lacies and pretties?  Grin

LOL,
Old Auntie B.

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Auntie B says: "I may look like Aunt Pitty-Pat, but I have the soul of Belle Watling," and "Since I can't be a good example, then I'm just gonna have to be a horrible warning."
betsyurven
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« Reply #101 on: April 25, 2007, 09:28:43 AM »

I can't find the instructions for the Mormon trek slat bonnet.  Can someone help?

Betsy
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BarbaraSmith
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« Reply #102 on: April 25, 2007, 09:33:07 AM »

The site is down right now due to technical difficulties. I thought I'd saved the instructions to my computer, but no.

I do have Pam's slat bonnet instructions, if she doesn't mind me re-posting them.

Cheers,
B.
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Pam Robles
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« Reply #103 on: April 25, 2007, 09:47:11 AM »

Repost away, Barb.  I snagged them from the web, myself.
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #104 on: April 25, 2007, 10:37:54 AM »

Anyone who needs the really basic one, email me, and I can send the PDF to you as an attachment.  Feel free to use elizabeth@thesewingacademy.org or elizabethstewartclark@hotmail.com 
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Elizabeth
BarbaraSmith
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« Reply #105 on: April 25, 2007, 10:50:56 AM »

Here's the repost of Pam's initial post (Thank you!):
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Title: Re: Past Patterns Victorian Sunbonnet?
Post by: Pam Robles on March 12, 2007, 10:16:49 AM
 
Here are the instructions I mentioned yesterday.  Amy , this may be the one you were talking about but the slats seem a good length to me.  It's easy to shorten them, if necessary.

I can't remember who posted these instructions and the website doesn't come up on a Google.  If someone recognizes them and knows whose they are, please let me know so they can be properly attributed.

How To Make a Slat Bonnet
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v663/MrsParker1/slatbonnetside.jpg)

Slat bonnets were worn commonly to protect women's complexions from the sun. Worn in an era when a pale complexion was considered fashionable and nearly every woman attempted at least some sort of protective measure when being outdoors, slat bonnets were worn in a variety of fabrics and social classes.

Slat bonnets are very easy to make yourself. They require minimum sewing skills and make a nice evenings project.

For durability and practicality, make your slat bonnet out of a sturdy fabric in a plaid or geometrical print. It's fun to play around with different colors for the bonnet and the inner lining--something that suits your complexion and eyes looks very well as an inner lining.

Have fun wearing your bonnet!

Procedure:

Step One: Preparation

To make your slat bonnet, you'll need some sturdy material for slats (either a lightweight wood or some stiff cardboard), about a yard to a yard and a half of material (depending on how large you want your bonnet to be). For the following instructions, I'll give my own measurements but feel free to alter these as you wish. For instance, you might want a longer curtain than I have made, so you'll add a few inches length to the curtain piece and the brim piece. Or, perhaps, you'll want a wider brim to offer better protection from the sun if you are planning to wear your bonnet for heavy-duty outdoor work. So, it's up to you!

From your fabric, you will cut three rectangles of material, these measurements:
• For the brim, cut a rectangle 9" x 40"
• For the back/curtain, cut a rectangle 20" x 30"
• For the inner brim lining, cut a rectangle 9" x 24"

You will also need some scraps of your fabric with which to bind the brim edge and to make ties for the inside of the bonnet, and also the back.

Step Two: Construction

Mark the casing lines in your brim lining piece. To do this, turn under 1/2" to the wrong side on each short side of the brim lining piece, and press. Measure across. Your brim lining piece should now measure 23". On each short side, draw a line 1/2" away from the edge. From line to line your brim lining should measure 22". Make casing lines 2" apart from line to line. There should be 11 casing 'slots' in all when you are finished.

Find the centers of both your brim and brim lining pieces. To do this, fold each piece in half and press. Matching centers, pin brim and brim lining together WRONG sides together. Sew lining to brim 1/4" from lining edge, and then again on the line 1/2" from brim lining edge which you drew in step 1. Sew all casing seams. Press.

Make your slats. If you are using wood, use a scroll saw for the best results, and lightly sand your slats for a smooth finish. If you are using cardboard, mark your slats and carefully cut them with a sharp pair of scissors or a knife. Make eleven slats 8" by 1 3/4". Slide them into the casings.
Take your back piece, and, starting at the edge of the brim, pin upwards towards the center of the brim. When you are a few inches from the center, stop and repeat procedure on opposite side. You will have a fairly large amount of fabric left over in the center, this can be gathered or pleated to fit the remaining area of the brim. Pleating is the easiest. Make a few pleats in the fabric to reach center brim, then repeat on other side. You will have 'points' of fabric sticking up. This is the corner of the rectangle. Just trim off the corners. If you have more fabric left over, make a giant pleat at the center of the brim, and pin. Sew. Turn bonnet right-side-out and press.
Hem the bottom edge of your bonnet by turning under a small hem and securing with a hand running stitch.

To bind the brim, first measure the brim and cut a 2" strip that length plus 1". Turn up 1/2" on each short side of the strip, press. Sew strip to the brim, right sides together. Turn under 1/4" on free side of binding strip, and fold binding to the inside of the bonnet. Slip stitch in place.
Cut four lengths out of your scraps left over about 1 1/2" x 15". Press up 1/4" on each long side of each tie, then fold them in half down the length, wrong sides together, matching edges. Sew about 1/8" from the edge.

Tack two ties to the back of your bonnet to adjust the fit of the crown around the head at about ear-length. Tack the other two to the inside of the brim about jaw-length.

To prevent edges of ties from fraying, cut on an angle, or finish with a narrowly rolled hem.

Enjoy!
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ronnijean
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« Reply #106 on: October 25, 2007, 07:06:11 PM »

So, I was at Wal-Mart today and saw this fabric at $1/yd. with 4 yds. left on the bolt. I'd been looking for fabric to make my first bonnet, and I wanted to know what you all think of this:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/40348102@N00/1752135509

It is 100% cotton (You can see the scissors underneath to tell how light it is). Does this fabric look correct, or completely wrong? Smiley Also, I saw mentioned in here earlier that it is possible to take Elizabeth's slatted bonnet pattern and just add cording to make it a corded bonnet, correct? What kind of cording should be used? I saw on another thread that that Peaches and Cream stuff is highly recommended - is this stuff good for bonnets too?
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Stormi Souter
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« Reply #107 on: October 25, 2007, 08:35:22 PM »

Fabric looks good to me. I rather like it, even. (this from a girl who likes very few patterns)
I used the Godey's 57 pattern to make a corded bonnet. I imagine you could fiddle with a slat bonnet pattern to make a corded bonnet...
  My biggest problem with my corded bonnet is it went limp! *sigh* I didn't use peaches and cream though, and I imagine if I had I could now starch it back into shape. Peaches and cream seams to work wonders for about everything. ;-) Actually, JoAnns now carries a knock-off peaches and cream, same weight, but it's 1 lb for about 7 dollars. I now have an endless supply of cording for all emergences.
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #108 on: October 26, 2007, 08:30:10 AM »

You could have fun with that fabric! 

You might find it easiest to hand-sew the bonnet and cording channels; you'll have more control and less worry about stretching/puckering by hand than by machine.  You want the cording channels TIGHT around the cotton cord; that, plus starch, makes a big difference in the body of the brim.

Also, be sure to wash the fabric at least twice in HOT water, and dry it hot, too.  You want as much "shrink" out as possible before you start.
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Elizabeth
Linda Little
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« Reply #109 on: October 22, 2009, 08:35:35 AM »


Sun bonnets are still viewed by many reenactors to be only appropriate for a working class impression, but photographs and written references make it clear that sun bonnets were worn for a wide variety of occasions, including 'Sunday go to meeting', at least in rural and smaller towns the period. (i.e. where the majority of the population still lived.)

Because sun bonnets required minimal fabric and comparatively little time to make, most women who wore them probably had more than one at any given time. A very plain one of sturdy fabric was probably used for doing outdoor chores such as tending the kitchen garden, etc., on most days. She may well have another plain one of much thinner, lighter fabric for doing those same chores during hot weather. The number of silk and fine wool slat corded bonnets, with carefully done ruching or ruffles, as well as similar ones of fine printed cotton make it clear sun bonnets were "not just for work anymore." I also have a number of white semi-sheer "barred muslin" corded sun bonnets that would not be amiss at a country "meeting house."

Sun bonnets were ideal for rural women who didn't feel the need, or have access to, fancy 'citified' frame or straw bonnets. They were made at home, they didn't go out of fashion and most important of all, they kept the sun off their faces on the walk or ride into town without resorting to an expensive and frivolous parasol. Also, if any of you have tried to use a parasol consistently enough to totally avoid getting any extra color in your face while juggling parcels, chasing children or dealing with any of the other uses one has for one's hands at events, you can understand why sun bonnets were so widely worn by women who spent more time out of doors than the 'ladies of leisure' who lived in cities or large towns. (whew! How's that for a run on sentence! ;->)

Sun bonnets came in a wide variety of colors and fabrics. With the exception of one white silk one I've only heard of, but not seen, the sun bonnets I own and the ones I have seen so far made of silk and or wool have all tended to be in dark colors, especially black for silk sun bonnets. Wool gauze or barege was a popular fabric for slat bonnets, with shades of brown and dark green being popular, at least among the extant ones I've seen. Woven check was common for the very plain "work" style slat bonnets, with a wide range of prints in medium to light colors being very popular for the mid range style of sun bonnets. And don't forget the many white, semi-sheer cotton sun bonnets. (BTW, I am currently on the lookout for more cotton voile with delicate checks or lines woven into it in case anyone finds any. I found a small quantity some time ago at a very reasonable price, but that stash is long gone. ;-<)


So, even if you are portraying a woman who routinely wears hoops, but you can't afford a frame or straw bonnet, you have trouble dealing with the sun without sun glasses and can't afford or don't want to bother with carrying a parasol, you can still, very accurately wear a delicately made sun bonnet for a fraction of the cost. "Such a deal, one shouldn't pass up!" :-)

Glenna Jo

I'm bringing up an old thread to ask a question. I' getting ready to make a corded silk bonnet fo "Sunday best" wear out of black silk taffeta. I was wondering if if the inside of the brim was ever a different color? I'd like to put a brighter silk on the inside to make it less dark (like being in a cave) and because black does not go well with my complexion. Same question about the ties? Might they be colored?
Linda
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Glenna Jo Christen
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« Reply #110 on: October 22, 2009, 07:29:15 PM »

While I've by no means seen every sun bonnet out there, I've seen quite a number of them and none of them had a contrasting color on the inside. I will be happy to ask a correspondent of mine who has been collecting sunbonnets for many years if he's seen one with a contrast lining. He has a room Filled with sun bonnets, albeit mostly European, but sun bonnets nonetheless.

Glenna Jo Christen
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Linda Little
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« Reply #111 on: October 23, 2009, 04:46:02 AM »

Thanks Glenna Jo. Any info you can offer is much appreciated but if it was not common practice, I will not do it. What about the ties? Should they be black (match the bonnet) or may they be colored?
Linda
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Glenna Jo Christen
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« Reply #112 on: October 23, 2009, 07:06:10 PM »

Still waiting to hear from Giles about the contrasting linings, but the ties on sun bonnets are almost always of the same fabric as the rest of the bonnet. Either used a rolled hem along any raw edges (they used selvage edges to avoid hemming when possible) or, especially with very fine fabric, sewn double layer and turned with the raw edges inside. This is rarely done in bonnets of calico or other more sturdy fabrics.

Glenna Jo Christen
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Jennifer Hill
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« Reply #113 on: December 21, 2009, 09:36:35 PM »

Glenna Jo, do you know if Catholic women wore sunbonnets to Mass or if they wore veils?  Jennifer
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Glenna Jo Christen
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« Reply #114 on: December 22, 2009, 11:13:00 PM »

Some women may have worn a veil with her fashionable bonnet, wearing a bonnet for church was de rigueur no matter what church a woman attended. A bonnet not only showed proper respect, but would also modestly cover the back of her neck and her ears, necessities for church if not most other places at the time.
Poorer &/or rural women very often wore sun bonnets, especially if she didn't have a more fashionable straw or silk frame bonnet.

Glenna Jo Christen
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Angela Harris
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« Reply #115 on: August 16, 2010, 09:30:27 AM »

The number of silk and fine wool slat corded bonnets, with carefully done ruching or ruffles, as well as similar ones of fine printed cotton make it clear sun bonnets were "not just for work anymore." I also have a number of white semi-sheer "barred muslin" corded sun bonnets that would not be amiss at a country "meeting house."...

Sun bonnets came in a wide variety of colors and fabrics. With the exception of one white silk one I've only heard of, but not seen, the sun bonnets I own and the ones I have seen so far made of silk and or wool have all tended to be in dark colors, especially black for silk sun bonnets. Wool gauze or barege was a popular fabric for slat bonnets, with shades of brown and dark green being popular, at least among the extant ones I've seen.

Glenna Jo

I have a wonderful lightweight wool, but it's a pale pink.  Is this appropriate for a corded bonnet, or should I just make a slat bonnet? The impression is middle-class, not down and out, but I don't have access to the latest and greatest fashions.

Thank you for your input.

Dawn
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #116 on: August 18, 2010, 09:31:20 AM »

Is it a lightweight wool, or a truly *sheer* wool? If it's lightweight, but not sheer, I'd save the wool for a winter/fall hood and use a very lightweight to sheer cotton for the sunbonnet.
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Elizabeth
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