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Author Topic: patriotic aprons  (Read 13061 times)
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betsyurven
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« on: March 05, 2008, 09:31:45 AM »

I know we talked a little about this before, can someone point me to a starting place for info on patriotic aprons?  Were these worn by both sides?  I'm looking for something to use for 4th of July and our annual civil war weekend.

Betsy
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Colleen
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« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2008, 10:07:58 AM »

I know we talked a little about this before, can someone point me to a starting place for info on patriotic aprons?  Were these worn by both sides?  I'm looking for something to use for 4th of July and our annual civil war weekend.

Betsy

Patriotic aprons WERE worn by both sides.  Karin Bohleke is teaching a class on them at the 1860's conference this weekend. In addition, she published an article on a particular one (Northern) in Civil War Historian, volume 1, number 3, and you can order back issues of the magazine.  They were made in cotton, silk, or wool (similar to wool flag bunting).  The designs vary greatly, from simple to elaborate.  If you are doing a pinner, then the stars are on the pinner portion, which would be blue.  If you are doing a belt, particularly a medici design belt, the stars are there...the stripes in the apron portion vary depending on whether you are doing North or South..in the South, there are three, red/white/red.  In the North, there are more, making it look like an American Flag.

There was an image of one on an 1861 Harper's Weekly, which may be seen here: http://www.sonofthesouth.net/leefoundation/civil-war/southern-belle-civil-war.jpg IN addition, the MOC owns one that has been on display there.

If you tell us which version you are interested in doing, maybe I can give you a little more info...my particular interest for a number of years has been Southern patriotic aprons, so that is where most of my research lies, but I am familiar as well with the Northern aprons.

Colleen Formby

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betsyurven
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« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2008, 10:45:52 AM »

Thank so very much!  I'm interested in doing a northern version.  I'll definately look into getting that issue of the magazine as well.  Thanks again.

Betsy
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AmandaCarol
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« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2008, 11:04:03 AM »

I made my patriotic apron about a month ago to wear for celebrations and such. I did the Southern version after seeing it on a few different times. I did seven handsewn stars in a cirle on the blue bib, then the three stripes red, white, red. I absolulty loved how it turned out!! I did my waistband to match the stripes on the skirt of the apron, it turned out great.  Good luck!
Amanda
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Colleen
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« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2008, 11:16:22 AM »

Thank so very much!  I'm interested in doing a northern version.  I'll definately look into getting that issue of the magazine as well.  Thanks again.

Betsy



This is the original of the apron Karin reproduced, found on the geenteelarts website. The stars here are embroidered on, and Karin gives meticulous details in the CW Historian article.

Colleen
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Pam Robles
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« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2008, 11:57:24 AM »

For what sort of occasions were these worn?  Would they have been saved and used for things like Independence Day events in later years, 1870's for example?  I'm looking for something interesting for our local musuem.
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« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2008, 01:37:08 PM »

For what sort of occasions were these worn?  Would they have been saved and used for things like Independence Day events in later years, 1870's for example?  I'm looking for something interesting for our local musuem.

Early war, particularly, at various times...SAS meetings, Sanitary Fairs in the north, other patriotic meetings...think of them as oversized cockades, as far as when they might be worn.  In addition, there are a number of notations of Southern women wearing "red/white/red" in various public places as a patriotic symbol.  You can see some of those on Vicki Bett's newspaper website at http://www.uttyler.edu/vbetts/red_white_red.htm .As the war goes on, that "rah rah war" mentality is not a prevalent, so you don't have the occasion for these as much.

I have no documentation one way or the other for post-war, but again, my personal research centers on the "secession apron", so they would obviously have not been worn post-war, since they were all modeled on the Stars and Bars and other Confederate flags. I don't have Karin's CW HIstorian article with me here at work, so I can't check and see if she says anything about the Northern apron as to whether it was ever worn post-war that she knows of.

Colleen Formby
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Linda Hayton
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« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2008, 02:11:11 PM »

Colleen,

Wondering what the bid part of a Southern apron looked like.  I like the sound of what Amanda did with the stars in a circle.  Were there other designs also.

Thanks,
Linda
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Pam Robles
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« Reply #8 on: March 05, 2008, 02:24:42 PM »


I have no documentation one way or the other for post-war, Colleen Formby

Okey dokey.  Thanks, Colleen.
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Colleen
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« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2008, 02:30:51 PM »

Colleen,

Wondering what the bid part of a Southern apron looked like.  I like the sound of what Amanda did with the stars in a circle.  Were there other designs also.

Thanks,
Linda



This is the link I posted earlier, with the engraving from the Harper's Weekly......from the research I've done, the configuration of stars on the pinner portion of the apron could have anywhere from 7-15, depending on how many states you are representing.  Scroll down to the bottom of this page: http://www.33rdnct.com/newletters/JUN2006.pdf and you will see one that is patterned after a particular flag as well.  The configuration is whatever you want, if you are not copying any particular flag. http://agsas1861-65.dotphoto.com/CPViewAlbum.asp?AID=4820289&IID=169396244&Page=1  shows one of our members, Virginia Mescher, wearing the one she made, patterned on the one from the Harper's weekly.  Hers is made from wool flag bunting.

Colleen
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« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2008, 02:48:21 PM »

Not being an ACW reenactor, I find these aprons quite puzzling. How can you tell which cause someone is supporting, when both sides wear red white and blue??? What is the distinguishing factor that makes one Confederate, the other Uinion?

Mystified,
B.
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« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2008, 02:58:18 PM »

Not being an ACW reenactor, I find these aprons quite puzzling. How can you tell which cause someone is supporting, when both sides wear red white and blue??? What is the distinguishing factor that makes one Confederate, the other Uinion?

Mystified,
B.


The simple answer is the number and configuration of stripes, and the number of stars.  Think of the American flag...numerous stars, and numerous stripes.  Now the First National Flag (CSA), which is what the majority of Southern aprons were patterned after....only three stripes, red/white/red, and no more than 13 stars on the final official version


There were variances in the number of stars on the Confederate flag,(ergo on the patriotic apron as well) depending on when the flag was created, how many states were in the Confederacy at the time, and also whether the "border states" were being represented on the flag in the number of stars as well.  In it's final form, the Stars and Bars bore 13 stars, for all the official states of the CSA, as well as for two "border states" that tried to secede and failed...Kentucky and Missouri.  This is a good page for an overview of the First National Flag: http://www.confederateflags.org/national/FOTCs_b.htm IN addition, Maryland and Delaware (a slave state at the time, but not in the CSA) are sometimes also represented by stars on various CSA flag configurations, even though the official version stated something else.

Colleen
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« Reply #12 on: March 05, 2008, 03:19:47 PM »

Ah! Thank you so much, Colleen! It's the three bars that are the most telling feature of the Confederate aprons, then.

Which begs the question: Were these patriotic aprons ever worn by Union sympathizers, or are they only found on Confederate sympathizers?

Cheers,
B.
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Auntie B says: "I may look like Aunt Pitty-Pat, but I have the soul of Belle Watling," and "Since I can't be a good example, then I'm just gonna have to be a horrible warning."
CivUSV
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« Reply #13 on: March 05, 2008, 03:31:30 PM »

Here's what my Confederate apron looks like.  Karen Bohleke made it based on an original.  The write up for this apron is in her CW Historian article that Colleen posted about earlier.



The stars have clear beads stitched over them.  The apron itself is made from flag bunting.

Regards,

Stacy
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« Reply #14 on: March 05, 2008, 04:28:00 PM »

You look fabulous Stacy!!!! I really like the style without the pinner. It's very chic.  Grin
B.
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Auntie B says: "I may look like Aunt Pitty-Pat, but I have the soul of Belle Watling," and "Since I can't be a good example, then I'm just gonna have to be a horrible warning."
Sheri Giffin
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« Reply #15 on: March 05, 2008, 07:34:47 PM »

On the pinner portion of the original provided by Colleen, what are the little "dots" on the stars?  Also, the ties seem short...is that because the apron portion would have wrapped around quite a bit or does it fasten with hook/eye? 
Thanks so much for placing the pictures and other documentation. 
sg
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Colleen
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« Reply #16 on: March 06, 2008, 08:11:40 AM »

On the pinner portion of the original provided by Colleen, what are the little "dots" on the stars?  Also, the ties seem short...is that because the apron portion would have wrapped around quite a bit or does it fasten with hook/eye? 
Thanks so much for placing the pictures and other documentation. 
sg

Quick answer before I head out the door for the conference....the "dots" are French knots, according to Karin's article, and I believe the ties are long enough to fasten in back either with hook and eye or pins......You really will need to order the copy of Karin's article in the CW Historian issue I posted in order to get all the fine details...I don't feel comfortable in doing that since she did SUCH a detailed analysis of the apron in the article...and basically tells you how to make that one as well.  Order the issue...you won't regret it!! :-)

And Stacy's picture doesn't even do justice to that apron..it is really lovely!

Colleen
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« Reply #17 on: May 26, 2008, 08:28:09 AM »

I just finished my Secession apron, and thought y'all might like to see it.....I took elements from several originals and images, including one image that was totally over the top...I figured if I'm going to make a statement, you're not going to have to guess at it!







Colleen
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Chessa_Swing
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« Reply #18 on: May 26, 2008, 08:49:52 AM »

I LOVE IT!  Its certainly does make a statement  Grin
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mr.darcy1
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« Reply #19 on: May 26, 2008, 08:58:40 AM »

That is pretty darn cool!  Looks like it was a lot of fun to make, and wear! Smiley

Regards,
Chandra
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Chandra Miller

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