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Author Topic: Styles of Men's shirts  (Read 31051 times)
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Phil Graf
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« Reply #40 on: August 13, 2008, 08:32:51 PM »

The website is attractive, but gives little details as to what the shirt looks like or where the pattern came from.  I'd be reluctant to plunk down the money as well when I don't know what I'm getting.  I mean no offense at all to the proprietors, but I just couldn't tell you anything about the quality or authenticity of their products just from looking at the website.
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Vicki Michalski
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« Reply #41 on: March 16, 2009, 10:40:54 AM »

OK, so for an absolutely newbie as far as men's shirts go, which patterns do you think would be best for me to procure in order to work out an 1860's civilian shirt?  If I purchase the Laughing Moon pattern I won't really know what modifications to make at this first attempt at sewing for hubby.  Is there another, perhaps not so correct for the decade one that might be good to look at in terms of construction tips or anything?  I'd like to try to start making some civilian clothing for him but don't want to start off on the wrong foot.
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debi casey
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« Reply #42 on: March 16, 2009, 08:29:57 PM »

Vicki,
If you adept at sewing and can make simple changes, then I would go with the Laughing Moon.¬  This is what I would do:¬  change the gathering on the back yoke from 2 distinct areas to one all the way across the entire yoke.¬  That is very easy.¬  Then the next item would be to change the sleeve placket to a very simple turn under "slit" at the¬  sleeve seam¬  ¬ Not too complicated.¬  The next step would be changing the drafting of the pattern.¬  On the front and back body pieces, take a straight edge and draw a straight line from the armpit to the bottom of the shirt.¬  The width of the shirt should be the same at the armpits as the hem.¬  Then when you sew your front to back, go to within about 4-5 inches of the bottom of the shirt.¬  Leave this open (unconnected), but turn under the raw edges twice and stitch up one, across for about 1/4 inch and then down the other one to the end.¬  Then hem your shirt by turning under 1/4" twice and topstitch.¬  That will get you a good shirt pattern with minimal problems.¬ 

Or I might suggest Charles Child's pattern, the "Louisiana".¬  I think that I would slash and spread the sleeves and add cuffs to the shirt.¬ 
http://www.crchilds.com/id47_la_shirt.htm

Edited to add picture:

This is what the shirt would look like.

Debi
« Last Edit: March 16, 2009, 10:32:44 PM by debi casey » Logged
BrianKoenig
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« Reply #43 on: March 16, 2009, 08:58:59 PM »

For a shirt of the 1860s I would recommend the Ageless Patterns #1048, 1869 Gentleman's Shirt. While the date given is past our period. The shirt pattern and features are the same as advertisements for shirts in 1860. The pattern however, comes only in the size of the original garment, 16.5 neck and 33 sleeve (which just happens to be perfect for me!) It also has a minimal amount of instructions.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2009, 10:42:09 PM by BrianKoenig » Logged

Brian Koenig

"However high we climb in the pursuit of knowledge we shall still see heights above us, and the more we extend our view, the more conscious we shall be of the immensity which lies beyond
Jill Kransel
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« Reply #44 on: March 26, 2009, 07:44:50 AM »

Has anyone attempted this Godey's pattern?  If so, could you post a photo of your shirt made up?

http://www.uvm.edu/~hag/godey/images/glb4-57dip.jpeg
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Beth Chamberlain
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« Reply #45 on: March 26, 2009, 10:43:42 AM »

Has anyone attempted this Godey's pattern?¬  If so, could you post a photo of your shirt made up?

http://www.uvm.edu/~hag/godey/images/glb4-57dip.jpeg

This shirt is based on the Godey's pattern. I also studied several of the diagrams in Thoughts on men's shirts. The Godey's diagram was far (FAR) from fitting the friend the shirt was for. The changes I had to make to fit him (he is on the heavy side and very barrel chested): I let out the body, added fullness to the sleeves, raised the shoulder a bit, lengthened the sleeve, lowered the armscye and curved it more to widen the bottom, and curved the neckline more. I used a collar from Thoughts on men's shirts. It sounds like I made a lot of changes but I think most of them were because of how the owner is built, if you're sewing for someone who happend to match the size of the pattern it's probably pretty good. Make a muslin and I highly recommend looking at Thoughts on men's shirts. There are a few more pics at http://s277.photobucket.com/albums/kk46/bookworm1860/portfolio/?action=view&current=TomShirt10.jpg


Beth
« Last Edit: March 26, 2009, 10:46:30 AM by Beth Chamberlain » Logged

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Jill Kransel
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« Reply #46 on: March 26, 2009, 11:11:39 AM »

Your shirt is remarkable.  What is the fabric you used?  Thoughts on Men's Shirts will come in handy, as there are no instructions with this pattern. Please alert me if I've missed them somewhere. 
This definitely calls for a muslin to play with and get all the pieces correct before starting.
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Phil Graf
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« Reply #47 on: March 27, 2009, 03:25:35 PM »

Very nice shirt!

The Homespun shirt pattern is a version of the original Godey's plate.  However, the only things I like about the shirt I made from that pattern are some of the changes I made.  No more reproduction shirt patterns for me, thanks.  I'm tempted to try an enlarged version of the original pattern, though.
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Beth Chamberlain
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« Reply #48 on: March 29, 2009, 06:36:47 PM »

What is the fabric you used?  Thoughts on Men's Shirts will come in handy, as there are no instructions with this pattern. Please alert me if I've missed them somewhere. 

I used Southern Belle broadcloth. It's a nice high quality broadcloth. It does have a lot of body though and I'm not sure if I wouldn't have actually been better off with something a bit more soft. If I remember right I went through the entire issue of Godey's and didn't find any instructions. You know, just make up in the usual way.  Roll Eyes

Very nice shirt!

The Homespun shirt pattern is a version of the original Godey's plate.  However, the only things I like about the shirt I made from that pattern are some of the changes I made.  No more reproduction shirt patterns for me, thanks.  I'm tempted to try an enlarged version of the original pattern, though.

I'm intrigued. Almost enough to get the pattern even though I don't really do men's clothes. I interpreted the little triangle piece as the gusset/reinforcement often found at the juncture of side seam and hem, they seem to have used it as an underarm gusset. But I can't seem to picture how they used a gusset with the shaped armscye. I don't know how I missed that pattern when I looked for men's shirt patterns, I didn't want to draft my own but I couldn't find anything in between squares & rectangles and the more trim French cut and I didn't think the more fitted cut would be good on this friend.

Thank's for the compliments. That shirt inspired the use of more than a few "colorful" sewing terms but in the end it was worth it.

Beth
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Men are made in the image of God. Gentlemen are manufactured by tailors,  barbers, and bootblacks. Woman is the last and most perfect work of God. Ladies are the productions of silk-worms, milliners
Susan Peden
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« Reply #49 on: March 29, 2009, 07:05:54 PM »

I recently came across a book on the history of photography in the United States which is a veritable treasure trove of photos of the 19th century- all kinds of portraits.  I was impressed with the wide variety of styles of men's shirts.  pockets, lapels, collars and trim.  The old shirt on the square can go by the way! Susan
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BrianKoenig
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« Reply #50 on: March 29, 2009, 08:52:46 PM »

I recently came across a book on the history of photography in the United States which is a veritable treasure trove of photos of the 19th century- all kinds of portraits.  I was impressed with the wide variety of styles of men's shirts.  pockets, lapels, collars and trim.  The old shirt on the square can go by the way! Susan

Do you remember the title of the book so I can add it to my library?

Thanks!
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Brian Koenig

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Susan Peden
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« Reply #51 on: March 30, 2009, 06:21:54 AM »

I don't remember the title but I will ask my workmate who is one of the Librarians at Green Mountain College and the only one at the Henry Sheldon Museum where I work.  He brought the book in for us to see. -  Susan
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Elaine Kessinger
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« Reply #52 on: March 30, 2009, 07:31:58 AM »

Truly...The Squares & Rectangles Shirt was going out by this time. The French Shirt with a curved armscye and a bit of shaping to the sides was very much "the new way" to make shirts by the late 1850s. It was used for custom-made shirts and ready-made shirts of the time, and also advertised prominently (so home needleworkers would have known about it too.)  The squares & rectangles should be a good option for very, Very economically challenged gents or older conservative gents who "won't bow to new-fangled fashions".
I recommend a thourough reading of "Thoughts on Men's Shirts in America" to see where shirts have been and where they're going before choosing the correct one for your gent.

-Elaine
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Susan Peden
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« Reply #53 on: March 31, 2009, 12:50:55 PM »

Brian,

Quote
Do you remember the title of the book so I can add it to my library?

The name of the photography book is:  The Origins of American Photography 1839-1885 from Daguerrotype to Dry-Plate, the Hallmark Photographic Collection at teh Newlson -Atkins Museumof Art, Yale Press.  It seems to have many 1850 photos- much text-

Susan Peden

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VMurphy
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« Reply #54 on: March 31, 2009, 03:27:32 PM »

This is all so interesting. I'm glad I found this thread before I cut into my linen.  I was ready to make a linen shirt "on the square" for my friend. He is portraying the local town doctor, and is in need of a full wardrobe.  We often attend mid to late 50's events so was comfortable with the the square shirt.

But I have an old, old Heidi Marsh Pattern for mans shirt and it has curved armseyes, and round neck. The sleeves are slightly gathered with a square shirtale. The sleeves are somewhat shaped as well, and it has a faced 3 button placket.
Would this work in white linen as an everyday shirt... Undecided   It's been 10 yrs. since I used this pattern so don't recall how well it worked.


Regards
Vivian Murphy
http://www.themantuamaker.net
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Elaine Kessinger
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« Reply #55 on: March 31, 2009, 05:32:15 PM »

How old is this doctor? how set in his ways? The pattern you describe sounds like it could be good for just about anyone in this era... if the doc is old & set, ie: the wife making his shirts is also old & set, she may still be using the Squares & Rectangles... if the doc is middle to  younger, or is buying his shirts...I'd recomend going with your patterrn. And linen is fine for a civilian doc's shirt, a classic, conservative choice.
-Elaine
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VMurphy
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« Reply #56 on: April 01, 2009, 04:58:29 PM »

After reading this thread, using the pattern was my "gut instinct"...Thanks for writing.  The doctor is middle aged, but since I have the pattern and the linen, I'll use it.  I was concerned about cutting the pieces "on the square" just using measurements.
Another fellow in our St.Louis group makes all of his own clothing and has written an intersting book of directions on cutting a shirt on the square.  He used an original shirt in the St.Louis State Historical Society archives as a pattern.  It has pleats laid on in the front and is very interesting. I'd still like to try making one just to say I did  Shocked
Regards
Vivian Murphy
http://www.themantuamaker.net
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Jennifer Hill
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« Reply #57 on: April 12, 2010, 09:40:16 PM »

After reading this thread, using the pattern was my "gut instinct"...Thanks for writing.  The doctor is middle aged, but since I have the pattern and the linen, I'll use it.  I was concerned about cutting the pieces "on the square" just using measurements.
Another fellow in our St.Louis group makes all of his own clothing and has written an intersting book of directions on cutting a shirt on the square.  He used an original shirt in the St.Louis State Historical Society archives as a pattern.  It has pleats laid on in the front and is very interesting. I'd still like to try making one just to say I did  Shocked
Regards
Vivian Murphy
http://www.themantuamaker.net

Vivian:  could you please point me in the direction of that book?  Yrs, Jennifer who is loving this thread
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Trish B
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« Reply #58 on: February 29, 2012, 07:01:15 AM »

Would this apply to a shirt for 1855 also? Our time period is  kind of in-between some of the items metioned in this thread. Also, the pictures have been removed from most of this thread ( What can I say- I'm a visual learner)  I wondered about just using Past Patterns ##007  view B.   If anyone could help, I'd be grateful.  I have to return  Thoughts on Men's Shirts   to the library first thing tomorrow- I had hoped to cut out a muslin today.       trish


Vicki,
If you adept at sewing and can make simple changes, then I would go with the Laughing Moon.?  This is what I would do:?  change the gathering on the back yoke from 2 distinct areas to one all the way across the entire yoke.?  That is very easy.?  Then the next item would be to change the sleeve placket to a very simple turn under "slit" at the?  sleeve seam?  ? Not too complicated.?  The next step would be changing the drafting of the pattern.?  On the front and back body pieces, take a straight edge and draw a straight line from the armpit to the bottom of the shirt.?  The width of the shirt should be the same at the armpits as the hem.?  Then when you sew your front to back, go to within about 4-5 inches of the bottom of the shirt.?  Leave this open (unconnected), but turn under the raw edges twice and stitch up one, across for about 1/4 inch and then down the other one to the end.?  Then hem your shirt by turning under 1/4" twice and topstitch.?  That will get you a good shirt pattern with minimal problems.?  

Or I might suggest Charles Child's pattern, the "Louisiana".?  I think that I would slash and spread the sleeves and add cuffs to the shirt.?  
http://www.crchilds.com/id47_la_shirt.htm

Edited to add picture:

This is what the shirt would look like.

Debi

« Last Edit: March 01, 2012, 02:56:38 PM by Trish B » Logged
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