Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Styles of Men's shirts  (Read 29436 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Carolann Schmitt
Moderator
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 4272


WWW
« Reply #20 on: May 11, 2007, 06:56:20 AM »

Hi, Kelly -

I've seen similar reinforcements on some other shirts. One was sold at the Whitaker Auction last spring. The size and shape of the reinforcement at the bottom of the bib really varies from shirt-to-shirt. It's interesting to see the different shapes and construction.

This is a neat shirt; thanks for posting the link.

Carolann
Logged

Carolann Schmitt - Only a historian understands how much you need to know in order to recognize how much you don't know. - Elizabeth Ann Coleman
cschmitt@genteelarts.com
www.genteelarts.com
billclark
Guest
« Reply #21 on: May 11, 2007, 02:58:07 PM »

WOW the white shirt by that seller is amazing!!  I am going to reproduce that this summer for sure!!!!!   The cartridge pleating at the neck and cuffs wow! 

Bill

(who is cursing the fact that he has noooo time this weekend left to try and make this shirt, gosh final exam studying is really getting in the way of my sewing projects! Tongue)
Logged
Elizabeth
Administrator
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7892


WWW
« Reply #22 on: May 11, 2007, 03:22:11 PM »

The gathering on the linen shirt is stroked gathering, not gauging or cartridge pleating.  The difference is one of edges: in gauging or cartridge pleating, the raw edge is turned down, the piece is gathered along the fold, and the folded edge of each gathering pleat is whipped to a finished edge.  With stroked gathering, the gathering is worked along a raw edge, and the gathering pleats are individually whipped to the folded-under seam allowance of the flat garment section--for a cuff, band, or waistband, this places seam allowances inside the finished band.  You can see the seam allowances inside the band quite clearly in the shirt sleeve cuff closeup.  You can also see a line of topstitching right up to the gathered portion--after that, the construction switches to whip stitches, where the gathers are secured.

Logged

Regards,
Elizabeth
debi casey
Frequent Scribbler
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 180


« Reply #23 on: May 11, 2007, 07:55:18 PM »

Kelly,

Burnley & Trowbridge Co. has a plaid (linen) similiar to this example and it only $12/yd.

Debi
Logged
kellydorman
Dedicated Scribbler
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 303


« Reply #24 on: May 13, 2007, 06:16:50 AM »

Hi Debi,

Thanks for the suggestion, but I'm not finding it on their site - am I missing something really obvious (yet again)?

Kelly
Logged

debi casey
Frequent Scribbler
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 180


« Reply #25 on: May 13, 2007, 12:29:20 PM »

Ohhh....maybe its because I have samples here on the table.  You have to order the samples from them.

Debi
Logged
Catherine Molanphy
Guest
« Reply #26 on: January 18, 2008, 09:25:23 AM »

However, you could "retro-fit" the Laughing Moon pattern by cutting the body of the shirt with straight side seams and a square shirt tail and moving the sleeve opening to the seam rather than a placket cut into the sleeve. You could even convert the yoke to a shoulder seam. These alterations would make it more typical of the styles worn during the 1860s. Folkwear also has a Victorian shirt pattern that can be retro-fitted to 1860s styles.

And now I will use my whiny voice: am I correct in inferring that, if one is not a competent enough sewist to feel comfortable retro-fitting patterns herself, there really are no options for her in terms of obtaining a shaped 1860's civilian shirt? I'm trying to outfit a Staten Island store owner from the 1860's, and feel fairly confident that he wouldn't be romping around in something old-fashioned, but I can't find anything, either ready-made or a pattern, that seems appropriate.
Logged
Carolann Schmitt
Moderator
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 4272


WWW
« Reply #27 on: January 18, 2008, 09:46:53 AM »

Hi, Catherine -

Do you have access to a copy of Thoughts on Men's Shirts by Bill Brown? It has detailed drawings with measurements for the original shirts shown in the book. It is very easy to adapt these illustrations to draft your own pattern or alter a commecial pattern.

Ageless Patterns www.agelesspatterns.com #1048 is a copy of an original pattern published in 1869. It is only available in the original size and the instructions are minimal, but the cut is also appropriate for earlier in the decade.

I wish Simplicity had published Martha McCain's pattern for a shaped or French cut shirt, collars, cuffs and cravats.  Sad   It was perfect for this period.

Carolann
Logged

Carolann Schmitt - Only a historian understands how much you need to know in order to recognize how much you don't know. - Elizabeth Ann Coleman
cschmitt@genteelarts.com
www.genteelarts.com
Catherine Molanphy
Guest
« Reply #28 on: January 18, 2008, 06:47:35 PM »

Yes, I do have access to that book, and I have perused it at length... I guess I just need to jumpstart my brain-- but whenever I hear the words "alter a pattern" I start to twitch. I guess I'm just surprised that no one as yet has issued such a pattern!

I do remember from that book that Bill Brown made the comment that military issue shirts were always a bit behind the latest fashion, so I suppose it is not surprising that there are no shaped shirt patterns on the market, since, after all, this hobby was mostly born out of people doing a military impression, and much of the products out there cater to the military reenactor's needs. I get the sense that many of the pattern companies who carry a civilian shirt did it sort of as an afterthought... you know what I mean?

(Thanks for directing me to Ageless Patterns! A pattern with minimal instructions is better than no pattern at all...)
« Last Edit: January 18, 2008, 06:57:05 PM by Catherine Molanphy » Logged
Carolann Schmitt
Moderator
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 4272


WWW
« Reply #29 on: January 18, 2008, 07:14:00 PM »

I guess I'm just surprised that no one as yet has issued such a pattern!

It's not for lack of trying! But there has to be a market...a market for a pattern that has several pieces, uses better (and thus more expensive than something on the dollar table at the mega-mart) fabric and requires a significant investment of time and workmanship for proper construction.  While most of the members of this forum see the value in such a pattern or a garment produced from the pattern, that's not the case for the majority of those in the hobby, or for the millions of other sewists who equate historic patterns with Halloween costumes.  Angry

Carolann



Logged

Carolann Schmitt - Only a historian understands how much you need to know in order to recognize how much you don't know. - Elizabeth Ann Coleman
cschmitt@genteelarts.com
www.genteelarts.com
LissaWilson
Guest
« Reply #30 on: January 19, 2008, 08:22:58 AM »

Elizabeth - Is there any way to make this thread sticky? It seems that I and others keep coming back to this one because of all the great info!
Logged
Elizabeth
Administrator
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7892


WWW
« Reply #31 on: January 19, 2008, 10:15:09 AM »

'Tis Stuck. 

Smiley
Logged

Regards,
Elizabeth
Joseph Stevens
Dedicated Scribbler
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 276


Baby sister and I, Cheadle Lake, May 2012


« Reply #32 on: January 29, 2008, 03:01:27 PM »

Ageless Patterns www.agelesspatterns.com #1048 is a copy of an original pattern published in 1869. It is only available in the original size and the instructions are minimal, but the cut is also appropriate for earlier in the decade.

Carolann,
Without having the pattern to look at it, the illustration of it is incredibly close to the Folkwear Victorian Shirt (http://www.folkwear.com/images/202views.gif).

If you've used it before, could you explain the differences?  This one has been on my list of things to purchase, but I keep forgetting to.  Most particularly I'm wondering if the small band seen along the top at the shoulder (http://www.agelesspatterns.com/images/1048.GIF) is just that--a narrow reinforcing band sewn along/over the seam as in earlier shirts, OR if its a continuation of a yoke from the back as found later.  If its the latter, does one find shirts that could date to the early 1860's with a yoke in back and a shoulder seam thats slightly advanced toward the front (as in the Folkwear pattern and many of the variations running around at events)?

My copy of Thoughts On Men's Shirts In America 1750-1900 arrived yesterday so I can start on my next phase of impression improvement this off season: shirts and drawers.  I put that off until this year because I decided that a shirt is less glaringly obvious than the uniform worn over it.  Grin

~Joseph Stevens
Logged

Joseph Stevens


"Oh, I like tedious, practical subjects. What I don't like are tedious, practical people." -Oscar Wilde; An Ideal Husband
Carolann Schmitt
Moderator
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 4272


WWW
« Reply #33 on: January 29, 2008, 05:59:41 PM »

Joseph -

I think I still have a copy of Ageless Patterns #1048; it's been visiting friends the past few years but I think it came back home. If it has, I'll be happy to pull it out and look at it as soon as I have a spare moment.

I'll have to check my files for more details on back yokes; right now my brain is focused on vests. However, the forward shoulder seam is not something I recall seeing on original shirts.

I'll get back to you on both topics as soon as I can. I'm inundated with Conference preparations at the moment.

Carolann

Logged

Carolann Schmitt - Only a historian understands how much you need to know in order to recognize how much you don't know. - Elizabeth Ann Coleman
cschmitt@genteelarts.com
www.genteelarts.com
Ms. Jean
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1855


« Reply #34 on: March 16, 2008, 04:40:36 AM »

I would like to hear about the men's shirt patterns available from James Country/Homespun:

http://www.jamescountry.com/patterns/homespunpatterns.html

They carry a Civilian Shirt, and Federal Shirt, and a Pleated Front Dress Shirt.

(DH doesn't like the ruffle-free Folkwear Poet's Shirt anyway.)

Thank you!

Jean
Logged

Ms. Jean
Route 66
Phil Graf
Guest
« Reply #35 on: March 16, 2008, 09:37:13 AM »

I have the Pleated Dress Shirt pattern, and I don't like it.  It's too short and doesn't fit well in the shoulders.  The pleats are bizarre, and the neck opening is cut too small for me.  I've found the original Godey's plate the pattern is based on, and I'm thinking of trying it out to see if I get a better result.
Logged
Carolann Schmitt
Moderator
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 4272


WWW
« Reply #36 on: March 16, 2008, 02:03:39 PM »

I've tried all three of these and don't like any of them. I had the same issues Phil did with all three styles.

Carolann
Logged

Carolann Schmitt - Only a historian understands how much you need to know in order to recognize how much you don't know. - Elizabeth Ann Coleman
cschmitt@genteelarts.com
www.genteelarts.com
Ms. Jean
Scribblor Infinitus
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1855


« Reply #37 on: March 16, 2008, 08:41:51 PM »


Thank you.

Drat, but thank you! Grin

Jean
Logged

Ms. Jean
Route 66
LissaWilson
Guest
« Reply #38 on: August 13, 2008, 04:15:00 PM »

Has anyone tried this pattern?

http://www.pastreflectionsreproductions.com/patterns%20and%20artwear/Pattern%20description%20pages/PRP005ManTFshirt.html

I don't recall a discussion on it and I am looking for a more formal shirt option for mid-late 1850s. The back yoke seemed to be more curved and the armscye a little bit more shaped so I thought it might be a better option for reading later than the Past Patterns. Thoughts?
Logged
Paris-Lynne Graham
Veteran Scribbler
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 739



« Reply #39 on: August 13, 2008, 06:01:37 PM »

I don't know about that shirt Lissa, but for $26 it better come with a Jim-Ruley-genie-in-a-bottle!   Wink
Paris
Logged

Visit our farm and family blog
pastoralsymphonyfarm.blogspot.com

My CdV blog
earthlyangelscdvs.blogspot.com
Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines