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Author Topic: Cravats  (Read 42134 times)
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Mary Warren
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« Reply #20 on: March 06, 2007, 07:27:31 PM »

Kelly, Would you mind posting step by step instructions for tying a cravat?  How are the edges of the silt taffeta square finished?  Thanks.

Mary Warren
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Mary Warren

A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have.?  ?  ?  Thomas Jefferson
NoahBriggs
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« Reply #21 on: March 07, 2007, 04:42:34 AM »

I really like to tie my own cravat. The knots are just endless and one can be as fancy or as simple as they chose. I’ve been tying my own modern tie since I was about 10 (I’m 21 now). I feel we should try and urge more men to tie their own ties and if they are unable, a women’s help would be warranted and appreciated.

Mr. Joshua Block


Now that's my kind of man!  My first post here, of course, but I decided to keep my finger on the pulse of civilian material culture .  It's quite a pulse, too.

Looking forward to future discussions . . .

Noah Briggs
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bevinmacrae
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« Reply #22 on: March 07, 2007, 07:41:00 AM »

Hadn't realized the endless variety in cravats! And they express quite a bit about the wearer, I think. Mr Dorman looks quite happy!
~bevin
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Bevin MacRae

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Carolann Schmitt
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« Reply #23 on: March 07, 2007, 07:55:30 AM »

Mary -

Most original cravats use the selvage edge where possible - assuming the selvage is not obvious and doesn't have advertising information printed on it. The other edges are finished with a narrow (1/8") rolled hem.  The fabric should have some body so the bow will hold its shape.

There are several different ways you can fold a square cravat into a long strip:
-  Fold two opposite points into the center so they just touch.
-  Fold the folded edges again in to the center so they just touch.
-  Repeat until one final fold gives you the desired width, then tie.

Or:
-  Fold in half diagonally.
-  Fold tip(s) to meet fold or other long edge.
-  Continue to fold edges to meet the center.

For a long rectangular cravat:
-  Fold long edges to meet in center.
-  Repeat until desired width.

Some cravats wrap from back to front and then tie; longer ones can begin at the front of the neck, cross at the back, and the ends brought back to the front for tying.

The most basic knot is a square knot: right over left, left over right. One of the most common is similar to the knot used by sailors. And there are many other variations, including a simple half-Windsor or four-in-hand.  Even a simple granny knot - if done in a nice silk taffeta, can be used. Wayne Belt was wearing a wonderful red and gold striped cravat with a wide flat bow on Saturday; perhaps Bevin or someone else has a photo of it.  If you don't have access to the book The Art of Tying the Cravat, a modern scarf book can help explain some of the knots you see in cdv's and other images.

Regards,
Carolann

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Carolann Schmitt - Only a historian understands how much you need to know in order to recognize how much you don't know. - Elizabeth Ann Coleman
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kellydorman
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« Reply #24 on: March 07, 2007, 07:27:35 PM »

Just to add to Carolann's excellent response:

It may take a bit of experimentation to determine the desired final width, we found about a two inch width works best for Robin, but that can vary from man to man depending on neck length and the number of chins.

We also found a longer cravat to be more versatile; we do the double wrap for a simple knot and a single wrap fro a more extravagant bow style.

Regards,
Kelly
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bevinmacrae
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« Reply #25 on: March 09, 2007, 06:38:55 AM »

I was pretty surprised (and delighted) to know that a Windsor knot was in use pretty much the way it is today for tying cravats. I like the look!
Sorry, I don't have any pics of that fantastic cravat!
~bevin
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Bevin MacRae

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BarbaraSmith
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« Reply #26 on: March 23, 2007, 09:41:44 AM »

Sort of a little to the left of the topic..... Jason, your lovely fiancee has a most CHARMING ribbon at her throat in most of the pix you've posted. It looks like it's tied in an intricate way that to my uneducated eyes looks much like a man's tie/cravat.

Can you enlighten us on how it's tied? Or send Annie to enlighten us?  Grin

http://www.jrwickerstysigns.com/

Pic of Annie's cute "tie":
http://www.jrwickerstysigns.com/cutecouple.html

Many thanks!
Barbara
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Auntie B says: "I may look like Aunt Pitty-Pat, but I have the soul of Belle Watling," and "Since I can't be a good example, then I'm just gonna have to be a horrible warning."
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« Reply #27 on: March 23, 2007, 07:24:47 PM »

I love that silk dress! Barb, did you see her black and white photo? She looks stunning, well, I should say, she IS stunning! When's the wedding?
~bevin
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Bevin MacRae

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BarbaraSmith
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« Reply #28 on: March 24, 2007, 06:08:51 PM »

Oh yes! I should have posted that photo. And Jason sent me another one that's even jauntier. She's wearing the same tie in all three, if my guess is good.

JASON! Pay attention to me!!!! (Auntie Bellum hollers and stamps her feet in a most unladylike way)

LOL,
B.
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Auntie B says: "I may look like Aunt Pitty-Pat, but I have the soul of Belle Watling," and "Since I can't be a good example, then I'm just gonna have to be a horrible warning."
NoahBriggs
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« Reply #29 on: April 24, 2007, 06:04:42 AM »

As far as how to tie one there is a book available from 1829 called THE ART OF TYING A CRAVAT. Although it is before our era, it is very interesting.

I'll say.  If I remember correctly there is a quote in there which goes something like, "To touch another man's cravat is an open invitation to bloodshed."
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billclark
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« Reply #30 on: April 24, 2007, 06:19:13 AM »

Does any one own a cravatin the style of the ones sold by corner clothiers?  I really like the look of them and I have a peice of silk for one and would love to know the dimensions!  Also it appears they are tied similar to a modern bowtie is this true?  I am just now struggling to learn how to tie a modern bow tie and if it is the same knot Ill be glad I mastered it!

Thanks,

Billr
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NoahBriggs
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« Reply #31 on: April 24, 2007, 07:38:39 AM »

Even better.  I have a pink one I can sell to you.  Otherwise, I'll just give you dimensions on the two I own, when I get home this evening.

CC is good enough to include a small instruction sheet on tying in a squarte knot, and how to tie it in what I call a flat bow, as opposed to the bowtie you see on your shoes.
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bevinmacrae
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« Reply #32 on: April 24, 2007, 09:48:16 AM »

Bill, didn't you have a pink shirt, or was that Connor?
Anyway, pink is THE color now adays!
~bevin
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Bevin MacRae

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billclark
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« Reply #33 on: April 24, 2007, 09:57:15 AM »

Conor has a pink shirt and I think a pink cravat would be histarical, but alas I do believe that pink is the color for me!  I have a wonderful small checked silk I would love to make into a cravat to wear with a new vest.  It would be great if I could get the dimensions and possibly the tying instructions.

Thanks

Bill
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Mary Warren
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« Reply #34 on: April 24, 2007, 11:12:03 AM »

Noha,  I'm still looking for dimensions and tying instructions.  If you don't mind, could you post your reply to the forum?  Thanks.

Mary
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Mary Warren

A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong enough to take everything you have.?  ?  ?  Thomas Jefferson
NoahBriggs
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« Reply #35 on: April 24, 2007, 04:00:30 PM »

Okay.  Pictures of the cravats have been uploaded to my imagecave album.

The pink one is 64 inches long, with a center seam.  At its narrowest point, it is 1 3/8ths of an inch wide.  At its widest, near the points, it is two inches wide.

The green one is 56 inches long, with a center seam.  At its narrowest point it is one inch wide.  At its widest, right at the angle, it is one and a half inches wide.

I have also posted an image of the instructions.  Essentially you are tying a square knot, much like a neckerchief.  Tie a half hitch left over right, then tie another half hitch right over left.
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billclark
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« Reply #36 on: April 24, 2007, 05:06:37 PM »

ok I'm having trouble picturing this right now, any posibility of some pictures?


Thanks,

Bill
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billclark
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« Reply #37 on: April 24, 2007, 05:13:00 PM »

ok heres this picture, so it is narrow in the middle swelling gently out to the full width before coming to a point?

[/IMG]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t97/whclark/neckties1.jpg[/IMG]


Thanks
Bill
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billclark
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« Reply #38 on: April 24, 2007, 05:36:23 PM »

Ok second try....



~Bill
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NoahBriggs
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« Reply #39 on: April 25, 2007, 03:30:39 AM »

Yes. your diagram (not to scale) shows the gist of the shape.
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