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Author Topic: I Finished my Godey Doll!!! Pics ......  (Read 9678 times)
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SouthernTNBelle
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« on: December 01, 2007, 05:03:57 PM »

This is the Godey doll from the pattern book by Dover Publications. This doll is going to be a Christmas present for my lovely daughter!!
The face is painted on......I do have a total of about 7 pics so please bear with me as I upload them. I changed a few things. Instead of painting the shoes on as it says to do in the book, I crafted my own pattern to make high ankle boots which actually tie. As well, I also crafted my own pattern of a spoon bonnet. The pattern in the book for the hat I didn't really like, and I wanted her to have a spoon bonnet!! What I did was take the spoon bonnet pattern I had for myself, and scanned it and decreased the size until I had the fit I wanted.
The ball gown is pink taffeta with white polka dots. I don't know if they had polka dots in fashion back then. But my daughter probably won't use this doll at reenactments anyway. And it was left over fabric from a party dress I made her. So she has a doll to match. I also used some of the polka dot fabric to trim the bonnet.
We've named her Rose..........



Here's the bonnet.....

« Last Edit: December 01, 2007, 05:05:57 PM by SouthernTNBelle » Logged
SouthernTNBelle
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« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2007, 05:08:33 PM »

Here's Rose in her underthings.......


And here is her "crinoline" and her ball gown.........


And her shoes...


« Last Edit: December 01, 2007, 05:16:46 PM by SouthernTNBelle » Logged
Anna G.
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« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2007, 07:36:44 PM »

Rose and her garments are absolutely darling! I'm sure your daughter will absolutely love her! Good job!  Smiley

-Anna
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Nona Nelson
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« Reply #3 on: December 01, 2007, 08:08:49 PM »

Oh, a a sweet dolly! I love her shoes! Very cute!
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Amy D.
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« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2007, 08:29:31 AM »

Oh, that is absolutely precious.  I've had that book for several years, but have never gotten around to using it.  Maybe I should!

I just finished a doll for my own daughter, using a McCall's pattern...  now I'm wishing I'd made the Godey's doll instead!  Grin 
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RebekahW
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« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2007, 12:47:07 PM »

I love the look!  How did you do her hair?
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SouthernTNBelle
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« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2007, 07:00:51 PM »

I love the look!  How did you do her hair?

The hair was a bit challenging. The directions in the book were a little vague. But I measured out strands of yarn at about two feet and then founded the middle, sewed it on the top of the head with as close as I could find matching thread. And sewing on enough yarn strands to go to the back of the head. This also made it look like she had a part down the middle of the top of her head. Then about 3/4 of the way down the head I sewd the yarn down again and sectioned off pieces of about eight strands. Those eight strands  I kept twisting and then looped and sewd the end down along the same line I sewd the hair at the 3/4 point. After looping the twisted yarn it seems to naturally curl and look like a saugage curl.
When all of that was done I measured out yarn strands at about 2 1/2 feet, and again found the middle and sewd that to the top of the head at the front. Each side I pulled back to the back of the head to form a pony tail at the base of the back of her head where I tied it off then braided it. Then looped the braid around to form a bun, tucking the rough end of the braid underneath and sewing around to keep the bun in place. Those sides also covered where the saugage curls were sewd at the base of her head where the yarn was also sewn down to keep in place.

Here's a better picture of the back of her head, showing a bit more of her hair. I like that it looks more "period."
« Last Edit: December 06, 2007, 07:08:49 PM by SouthernTNBelle » Logged
Sara
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« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2007, 11:30:49 PM »

Oh my goodness!! She is gorgeous! I love her underthings and beautiful hair.  Her bonnet is so sweet too.  What book is this that you speak of? I was using "How to make an old-fashioned cloth doll" (I think), but the pattern was quite modern. (I also only ever got the torso done).  I'd love to know and try my hand. Smiley
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Fiddlin Girl
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« Reply #8 on: October 25, 2009, 06:26:15 PM »

SO Cute!!! Love everything about it. Smiley
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Marta Vincent
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« Reply #9 on: October 26, 2009, 07:19:24 AM »

she's lovely!  Now you need to make her a day dress to wear with her pretty bonnet; and fancy white (or pink) dancing slippers and a floral head piece for her ballgown.  Then she'll have 2 complete outfits and your daughter can change her clothes!

And after all of that, then there is the outerwear....  Roll Eyes Wink Grin  (ducks & runs)

Yes they had polka dots.
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Fiddlin Girl
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« Reply #10 on: October 28, 2009, 03:27:08 PM »

And after all of that, then there is the outerwear.... Roll Eyes Wink Grin (ducks & runs)

ahaha!!! Grin
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Jehanne H
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« Reply #11 on: July 02, 2012, 04:45:44 AM »

I am in love with your doll!
I must have the pattern, please.  Can you, or anyone else, post a link to the book?
She is so wonderful!
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Marjorie Bennett
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« Reply #12 on: July 02, 2012, 03:45:43 PM »

What a lovely doll! 

I am very inspired by the hair that you created with the yarn.  Thank you for describing you technique. 

I am working on a cloth doll from Elizabeth's pattern but I think I will do the hair as you have described.

I'm sure that your daughter will absolutely love it!

Best Wishes,

Margie
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Marjorie Bennett

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Elizabeth
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« Reply #13 on: July 03, 2012, 01:22:00 PM »

Jehanne, it may be out of print right now; google Dover Books for the publishing company. (And of course, we have our doll pattern on the main site: www.thesewingacademy.com
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Regards,
Elizabeth
vmescher
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« Reply #14 on: August 25, 2012, 11:16:56 AM »

Your doll and clothes are wonderful and I'm sure your daughter will enjoy her. I did want to point out that the doll was not a pattern from Godey's Magazine.  When Godey's had any patterns for dolls, it was clothes, furniture, fences for a doll house, and a few knitted or crocheted patterns for clothing items but the latter was later than our period. 

The way that your doll was associated with Godey's is because in the 1941, Charlotte  Eldridge, while recovering from an ulcer,  made a sculptured fabric doll (papier mache face) and designed the dresses from the fashion plates in Godey's and called them "Godey Lady Doll."  In 1943, under the name of Frances Jennings, she was selling her dolls at Sloans Department Store in New York for $100 each.   She published  the book, The Godey Lady Doll, in 1953. The book contains patterns for the doll, clothing and furniture.  Charlotte is considered the creator of the Godey Lady Doll.

In the mid to late 11940s Ruth Gibbs began making "Godey Little Lady Doll," was made with a white or pink china head, cloth body and somewhat crude china arms and legs.  She dressed them in clothing made from her interpretations of Godey's fashion plates. Gibbs continued to make these smaller china dolls until the early 1950s.  Both Gibbs and Jenning's dolls ranged in sizes from 7 to 12 inches.

In 1950, the Madame Alexander doll company began making Godey Lady Dolls and continued to do so until the 1990s.  These dolls were vinyl and dressed in Godey's fashions.

In 1978, Dover Publishing Company introduced a book by G. R. Jones titled, An Easy to Make Godey Doll.  This doll is a cloth doll with painted features, and a somewhat sculptured hands.  The clothing is an interpretation of Godey's fashions. 

Since the terms used for the dolls, is "Godey Doll" or "Godey Lady Doll" is modern, I would not refer to the doll as a Godey Doll  since it is not a period term.  They would have been called "cloth dolls." Most of the period cloth dolls are not quite as elaborate as those in the Eldridge or Jones' books.   I'm sure that some mothers of even daughters looked at the fashion plates and tried to replicate the clothing so your doll would be completely at home. 
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Virginia Mescher
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