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Author Topic: Drawn Bonnet Pattern  (Read 4194 times)
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mr.darcy1
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« on: November 16, 2007, 11:15:18 PM »

Does anyone know if there are any millinery patterns out there to make a drawn bonnet or is it something that you can allow for in a pattern I have already?  I've searched the internet at the usual vendors but no luck.  I was looking to make one in a 1840s-early 1850s shape if that is any help.  Thank you.

Regards,
Chandra
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mr.darcy1
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« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2007, 12:42:33 PM »

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Chandra
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LissaWilson
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« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2007, 01:15:49 PM »

I also am craving a drawn bonnet, but I think I am going to purchase one after the discussions of difficulty here on the board. Miller's Millinery carries a drawn bonnet pattern, but it says it is for a 1864 bonnet. I wonder if you could modify it to give you a 40s or 50s shape? You might talk with Lynnette Miller, she is very personable! She also carries Bonnet Foundations which are basically the buckram blanks. Maybe she could make a blank for you in the shape you want and you could use the pattern instructions to draw it.

www.bonnets.com

Pam Robles also knows how to do it and might be able to supply you with a blank and instructions on how to do it. Hope this helps!

www.victorianbonnets.com

I'm sure you already know these links, but its always useful to have them repeated and handy in a thread!
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« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2007, 01:30:10 PM »

Try Timely Tresses:
http://www.timelytresses.com/page9.html

The Veretta Louia makes a lovely drawn bonnet, along with some of the other patterns! The proprietresses are very nice and would help you pick the pattern that would match what you want exactly.
 -Stormi
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Lee Jorgensen
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« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2007, 07:38:44 PM »

I made the Veretta Louise and it is a great bonnet!

I wonder if you made a strip of fabric maybe three times the width of the pattern piece for the bonnet, then sew tucks into the fabric and string hemp cord through the tucks and gather the fabric . Then lay the pattern piece over the gathered material and cut it out. Then this could be placed over the bonnet buckram frame and go from there.

Any other ideas?

I also have some thin basket making cane that might work for the ribs in the bonnet.


I have some sheer cotton I thought would make a really nice looking drawn bonnet. Hmm...wheels turning...
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Pam Robles
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« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2007, 08:32:50 PM »

3X is too much.  1 1/2 is closer to the mark.
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Lee Jorgensen
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« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2007, 12:33:15 PM »

Thank you! I'm thinking I will try this! I love to make bonnets, can you have too many?
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Pam Robles
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« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2007, 12:34:34 PM »

Thank you! I'm thinking I will try this! I love to make bonnets, can you have too many?

In my professional opinion, nope.  Wink
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bevinmacrae
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« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2007, 09:45:22 AM »

A drawn bonnet will be my next bonnet attempt.

So a few questions, if I may!

Is the fabric is drawn and caned over a regular buckram frame?

Do you sew casings for the canes before you start arranging things or do you sew the canes in place as you go? Several examples I saw this past weekend seem to indicate hand sewing the canes in as you went to assure a smooth fit of the fabric over the frame.

I'm thinking of using lightweight millinery wire instead of canes, will that still be ok (trying to use materials onhand!)

How do you secure the canes at the neck edge of the bonnet so they don't poke?

To make a round tip, you wet the buckram and then place it over a dish or something that has the right shape, right? Will it come off the bowl easily? Mine stuck before, is there a trick to keeping it from sticking? Baking spray?
Bevin
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« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2007, 10:02:42 AM »

Hi, Bevin -

This is the way I do it in my classes. I'm certain it's not the only way it's done and that Pam and others will have other suggestions; but it has worked very well for my students and me.

Quote
Is the fabric is drawn and caned over a regular buckram frame?
I've used both buckram and wire/net frames. I've examined a few originals that only had wire around the outer edges of the bonnet and used just the canes to achieve the shape, but I've never experimented with that technique.

Quote
Do you sew casings for the canes before you start arranging things or do you sew the canes in place as you go? Several examples I saw this past weekend seem to indicate hand sewing the canes in as you went to assure a smooth fit of the fabric over the frame.

I sew the casings after planning the spacing and deciding whether or not I'll add tucks along some of the canes. I think sewing the canes in place as you go would be very awkward to work with and difficult if not impossible to make adjustments after the casings/canes are sewn. After the fabric is gathered onto the canes and the canes and fabric are secured to one side of the bonnet, I snug the canes down against the frame and stitch the opposite ends in place.

Quote
I'm thinking of using lightweight millinery wire instead of canes, will that still be ok (trying to use materials onhand!)

I've seen some originals done over wire, but personally didn't have much success with it. No matter how smoothly I tried to finish the ends of the wire it still wanted to catch on the fabric.

Quote
How do you secure the canes at the neck edge of the bonnet so they don't poke?

I trim them even with the bottom edge of the frame, then sew through each cane attaching it to the frame. The ends and the bottom edge of the frame are covered with a bias binding.

Quote
To make a round tip, you wet the buckram and then place it over a dish or something that has the right shape, right? Will it come off the bowl easily? Mine stuck before, is there a trick to keeping it from sticking? Baking spray?

I let someone else make my frames.  Cheesy 

Regards,
Carolann
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« Reply #10 on: November 19, 2007, 10:16:08 AM »

Bevin,
I know a local place that has basket reed for very little. Would that be doable?

I would like to try a non-straw bonnet for myself this winter. Maybe this could be this year's birthday/tax present.

Anna
« Last Edit: November 19, 2007, 10:18:17 AM by Anna Worden » Logged

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Miss Cassandra
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« Reply #11 on: November 19, 2007, 07:49:27 PM »


To make a round tip, you wet the buckram and then place it over a dish or something that has the right shape, right? Will it come off the bowl easily? Mine stuck before, is there a trick to keeping it from sticking? Baking spray?


 I'm not even pretending to be an expert ( Grin), but I read in my millinery book, that you should do it over your bowl, covered with Aluminum foil, and loosen it with a corset-bone.

 Interesting thread, a drawn bonnet is on my sewing list, to.
Cassie
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bevinmacrae
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« Reply #12 on: November 20, 2007, 10:04:43 AM »

Anna, we'll have to have a bonnet day! I think basket cane might work. I'll make frames (gonna try the foil trick!) if you get canes!

So is planning the spacing difficult? I can imagine it might be given that the canes are not equidistant from each other at every spot.

Looking at one of Pam's study bonnets I found that one had just a buckram tip and that the caning on the body of it used the lining as casings for the canes. I thought this might be easier. There were also very few canes compared to some examples.

So the amount of fabric to use would be cut 1 1/2 times the width of the bonnet but probably be  slightly longer than the body of the bonnet. This would allow for not too much fullness  of gathering and allow for the casings of the canes.

I'm also intrigued by Pam's antique that has a couple little ruffles at one of the casings. How was that done? My fabric is a plain gray silk so a few fancy ruffles might help it look it's best. I found this silk looks nice when it's been gathered up and not left flat, thus making it the right candidate.
Bevin
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« Reply #13 on: November 20, 2007, 10:26:58 AM »

Sounds like a plan. It would need to be later winter. Will that work?
I am thinking about remaking the ginger silk dress from my brother's wedding into this bonnet. I'll likely never wear the dress again. I'll wear a bonnet all the time.

Anna
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« Reply #14 on: November 20, 2007, 07:22:50 PM »

I just got out my silk for this project and discovered I probably don't have enough. Will have to search FFC for more! But I did put together the flowers for inside the brim and choose a ribbon. This is going to be FUN! Maybe it could be like a bonnet for spring.
Bevin
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Bevin MacRae

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Pam Robles
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« Reply #15 on: November 20, 2007, 09:35:16 PM »


Looking at one of Pam's study bonnets I found that one had just a buckram tip and that the caning on the body of it used the lining as casings for the canes. I thought this might be easier. There were also very few canes compared to some examples.


Which bonnet were you looking at, Bevin?  I don't think any of them use the lining for casings.  That's usually reserved for heavy fabrics.  If I know which one you have in mind, I can go dig it out.
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« Reply #16 on: November 21, 2007, 09:02:50 AM »

It was the black coal scuttle bonnet. Perhaps I just looked at it wrong?
Bevin

who is dissapointed she needs to order more silk for her drawn bonnet but FFC doesn't have any of it right now!
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Bevin MacRae

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Pam Robles
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« Reply #17 on: November 21, 2007, 11:32:15 AM »

Bevin, you're absolutely correct.  The brim facing is used to sandwich the canes and the back portion is done using tuck channels.  It took a while to find the bonnet.  It was very surprising to find bonnets I'd forgotten I'd added to the collection.    Don't get old.   Roll Eyes
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« Reply #18 on: November 28, 2007, 12:24:28 PM »

I am used to seeing round reed for drawn bonnets. This one looks like flat reed:
http://www.mccord-museum.qc.ca/en/collection/artifacts/M972.122.4&section=196

Towards the back there is a little change in the fabric. Is this where the buckrams begins on this one?

Anna
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« Reply #19 on: November 28, 2007, 12:38:04 PM »

And I've found more original drawn bonnets with flat reed. Just goes to show the larger the database, the better.  Smiley

Carolann
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