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Author Topic: Hot Tin Dip  (Read 1210 times)
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mr.darcy1
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« on: September 29, 2007, 08:26:33 AM »

Does anyone know where to purchase Hot Tin Dipped (not electroplated) camp cooking kettles?  I have looked high and low for some that are 1840s appropriate and have yet to find any.  Patrick Cunningham doesn't have any through Ezra Barnhouse and the kettles from Carl Giordano are too early of a style.  I don't like using my dutch oven for boiling potatoes or eggs when I could be using it to make something else that takes a few hours to cook.  I appreciate any input.

Regards,
Chandra
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Chandra Miller

Dressing the 1840s
http://dressingthe1840s.blogspot.com/
Vaughne Hansen
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« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2007, 12:19:47 PM »

What about the Village Tinsmith?

--Vaughne
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mr.darcy1
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« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2007, 04:35:26 PM »

Nope, that's electroplated as well.  Thanks for info though.

Regards,
Chandra
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Chandra Miller

Dressing the 1840s
http://dressingthe1840s.blogspot.com/
Vaughne Hansen
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« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2007, 05:43:04 PM »

I have a lovely dipped cup that I received last year for my birthday.  I have asked where it came from.  Will let you know when I get an answer.

--Vaughne
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Vaughne Hansen
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« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2007, 07:45:25 AM »

I checked:   the tinsmith that our unit used to order from has retired after he had a stroke.

--Vaughne
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Jill Kransel
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« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2007, 08:24:37 AM »

There are links at the end of the article that may be helpful to you.
http://www.geocities.com/madisontin/Tinplate.html
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Nancy Rowan
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« Reply #6 on: October 10, 2007, 12:18:17 PM »

Hello,

I don't know if how this tin is produced, but I was amazed at the variety of tinware produced by the tinware shop at Old Sturbridge Village.
 Much of what is produced there can be obtained by calling their onsite shop directly.

Nancy R
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RoseEvans
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« Reply #7 on: October 10, 2007, 05:41:51 PM »

There are links at the end of the article that may be helpful to you.
http://www.geocities.com/madisontin/Tinplate.html

Patrick Cunningham, whose site is one of the links at the bottom of the above site, is an exellent tinsmith! There are actually 2 websites for him -- don't know why, but go to both: 
http://www.cunninghamtinner.com/
http://tinmanofmadison.tripod.com/

I have a large tin pitcher that he made, and it's beautiful! He has really good prices, too. Unfortunately, the prices aren't included on the extended list of goods, but as you can see from the items that DO include the prices, they are more than reasonable!

I had planned to order a set of nesting sheet iron kettles from him a few years ago. They would need to have wrought iron bails, and he doesn't do ironwork, but any period blacksmith could it. These are very period correct for the 18th century -- don't know about the CW. He will do custom work, too, and I'm sure his prices for custom orders are as reasonable. He had told me that he would rather be working tin than anything else he can think of. That's a good sign!
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