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Author Topic: What options do I have for collars?  (Read 5252 times)
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Amy D.
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« on: September 27, 2007, 10:32:04 AM »

I just finished a dress using the Past Patterns darted bodice pattern.  I have a couple collars but they are made from the Simplicity patterns... and they are all about 2" too short to go around this neckline!  I don't have any fabric to make more collars with, either.  The only white fabrics I have are muslin and twill.  And 15 yards of cotton/poly eyelet fabric (for modern use- I promise!)

I don't like the look of the bodice without a collar, it looks too bare for my tastes (even with a brooch).  Somewhere I have some of that tatted-looking lace edging... can I whipstitch that along the neckline edge? 
« Last Edit: September 27, 2007, 11:08:53 AM by Amy D. » Logged
Jobeth
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« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2007, 10:49:41 AM »

I was wondering the same thing.  I have  "make do" collar right now of (modern) muslin, and the only other white fabric I have is twill.  Can I use either of those?
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2007, 05:34:01 PM »

Do a temporary collar in a single layer of white muslin.  A light starch, and it's perfectly fine!
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Elizabeth
Amy D.
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« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2007, 05:47:07 PM »

I ended up using some *gasp* gathered eyelet edging!!  I had some of that imported Swiss embroidered stuff and I couldn't even find that until I got home today.

(Goes off to pull out Dressmaker's Guide to re-read the instructions on drafting collars, and make some specifically for these dresses...)
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Marta Vincent
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« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2007, 02:02:07 PM »

There now are two collar pattern sets available from KayFig patterns.  http://shop.originals-by-kay.com/category.sc?categoryId=34

One include collars & cuffs 1857-1860, and the other 1863 & '64.
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RoseEvans
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« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2007, 06:12:35 PM »

I just received the 1863/64 KayFigII collar pattern in the mail. It contains several patterns for making broderie anglaise collars. I couldn't really see what the collars looked like when I ordered it, but was very pleased with it when it arrived.

I haven't started anything yet, since I've been having fun with the 1860 crochet collar pattern, but hope to start embroidering on cotton lawn -- and now, I have inspiration from the lady on this forum (can't remember your name) who created such an amazingly beautiful embroidered collar! Seeing the collar on your period dress made me so glad I'd ordered a pattern that includes similar collars! Do I think I can reproduce as fine a collar as yours? Not!! I've embroidered a lot in my day, but your collar -- more breathtaking than I think I can bear!

Whoever you are, I'm sorry I can't remember your name, and thank you for the inspiration of your amazing needlework!

~Rose
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atlantashannon
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« Reply #6 on: October 07, 2007, 09:32:48 PM »

You mean white muslin collars aren't correct?  Shocked  Sad
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #7 on: October 08, 2007, 05:09:34 AM »

White modern utility muslin can be too rough and bulky for some period collars.  Batiste, organdy, lawn, and other fine cottons will better mimic the original fabrics, but if white muslin is all one has to hand, or if the impression is a very working class one, then give it a good starch, make it a single-layer collar, and wear it in good health. Smiley
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Elizabeth
dulciewhite
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« Reply #8 on: October 08, 2007, 06:16:53 AM »

Does one have to have a collar? THis has been bugging me lol. Im sewing the Musuem Curator black and white dress, only opposite colours... and Im wondering if that one needs a collar or not.
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #9 on: October 08, 2007, 06:23:06 AM »

The vast, vast majority of images from the 60s show white collar use.  (Things are a little more flexible in the 40s, but collars become very common in the 50s, and are nearly ubiquitous in the 60s).  With something so highly fashionable, with the slightly "funneled" high neckline, a tiny standing collar, or very narrow fold-down collar might be a good option.
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Elizabeth
Colleen
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« Reply #10 on: October 08, 2007, 07:20:26 AM »

Does one have to have a collar? THis has been bugging me lol. Im sewing the Musuem Curator black and white dress, only opposite colours... and Im wondering if that one needs a collar or not.

Think about the reason FOR the collar, and you'll find yourself answering "yes".  Collars were not a part of the dress, as you know, but detachable.  The reason for this is not only decorative, but functional.  If you have ever looked at the collar of your modern shirts, etc., around the neck, you'll notice that is where the most perspiration and "dirt" show up....the period collar guards against that, and may be easily detached to wash, and you can freshen your dress up with a clean set of collar and cuffs, even after doing work (hard or not) all day. You'll find that you seldom need to wash the entire dress, depending on its use, but that you will need to wash the collar and cuffs.

Colleen Formby
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Colleen Formby
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Lizzy D
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« Reply #11 on: July 16, 2008, 02:42:53 PM »

I have a friend who hand tats lace and bookmarks and doilies... So I thought of buying some hand tatted lace from her, or having a collar made.
Would it be appropriate to have a hand tatted collar on a dress? Or tatted lace edging?

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Elizabeth
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« Reply #12 on: July 16, 2008, 02:56:05 PM »

It *can* be, but it will take some research before settling on a design.  I would highly recommend getting Virginia Mescher's "Flitting Fingers" book before settling on anything. www.vintagevolumes.com

 And, make sure the tatting is in lace-weight thread (finer than machine sewing threads, most of it!)... on white accessories, tatted lace needs to mimic fine "true" laces, and perle cotton is far, far too thick.
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Elizabeth
karengillmore
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« Reply #13 on: July 17, 2008, 05:02:55 PM »

Are collars always white?  I have a client who wants a collar and cuffs in ecru or tea dye color.  She's doing an 1857 impression.  The dress is a dark green.
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Stacey Nadeau
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« Reply #14 on: July 18, 2008, 07:06:45 AM »

There have been a few discussions on this board about colored collars.  Everyone seems to concur that unless it's a black collar for mourning wear, a white collar and cuffs are the only way to go.  I've fought the ecru battle with a few volunteers and diplomacy is your biggest tool.  After quietly stating that research shows white to be the standard color, I lay a strip of white and a strip of ecru fabric on their dress fabric and point out how well the white sets it off.  The ecru makes almost all colors seem muddy while the white makes the color pop. 

Hope this helps,
Stacey
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Marta Vincent
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« Reply #15 on: July 18, 2008, 07:24:33 AM »

White modern utility muslin can be too rough and bulky for some period collars.  Batiste, organdy, lawn, and other fine cottons will better mimic the original fabrics, but if white muslin is all one has to hand, or if the impression is a very working class one, then give it a good starch, make it a single-layer collar, and wear it in good health. Smiley

It is my understanding that linen was acceptable for collars & cuffs during mid century.  I've made plain collars for plain work dresses from fine, lightweight linen.  A little simple whitework embroidery at the edge, and starch, and they look lovely and seem to 'fit' the impression well.
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #16 on: July 18, 2008, 07:26:49 AM »

The date makes no difference.  If the goal is to replicate the clothing system and aesthetic of the mid-century, then a white collar/cuffs is her best option for a non-deepest-mourning outfit. 

I don't envy you--I've had to be Diplomatic Diva with clients in the past, too.  Remember, you have the option to *not* take the project, if the results would be a non-period thing you'd hesitate to show off.  Ecru collar would fit in that range for me, as it would be "something a reenactor wears", not "something a person from the past wears."
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Elizabeth
Jessamyn
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« Reply #17 on: July 18, 2008, 11:05:15 AM »

Sometimes the ecru/tea-dyed battle is best won by carefully explaining that while such colors look charming and vintage to us now - they have an "antique" look - those collars that are now ecru were white when they were new; if a genuine 19th-century person saw you wearing an ecru collar, she would think it was old and dirty!
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Salli_Bonnets
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« Reply #18 on: July 23, 2008, 01:03:51 PM »

Just food for thought:

I also have thought that the white collar and cuffs might be symbolic of purity. I call the mid-vistorian era (especially the civil war era) the 'I'm-a-better-Christian-than-you-are' era, and think of it this way. A 'lady' with a collar and cuffs might appear 'cleaner' (because she changes them out frequently) and 'cleanliness is next to godliness'.

Just a guess. And I agree that white collars set off a dress nicely. I looked up that thread where someone posted the embiodered collar they made but the photo had since been removed. Could we see it again?
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Tarheel
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« Reply #19 on: July 29, 2008, 07:30:44 AM »

This is a picture of the Broderie Anglaise collar and cuffs I made from a pattern in Godey's April 1858 magazine. Without meaning to it seems that the embroidery design complements the pattern design on the fabric. I worked on this for about one and one half months. I tried to pick the simplest pattern I could find to copy.

Linda H


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