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Author Topic: 19th Century Patterns  (Read 4133 times)
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rebeccaroberts
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« on: July 20, 2007, 12:28:39 PM »

I am looking for a 19th century man's shirt pattern. I can't seem to find any place that sells them on the web. My dad wants me to help him make one, but I can't seem to find any patterns. Any ideas??? Thanks.

-Rebecca Jane Roberts
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iphigenia
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« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2007, 12:38:13 PM »

http://www.pastpatterns.com/007.html
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rebeccaroberts
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« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2007, 12:46:27 PM »

I've seen that one, but my dad says that's not the one he was talking about I think he was thinking something more along the lines of the Simplicity #5023. But it comes with a pattern for the trousers as well.

-Rebecca Jane Roberts
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Jill Kransel
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« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2007, 12:59:58 PM »

I believe the Simplicity 5023 is a trouser pattern Huh Here is another pattern source:
http://www.jamescountry.com/patterns/homespunpatterns.html
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JasonWickersty
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« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2007, 01:12:22 PM »

Highly highly recommend Charlie Childs' "Holliday" shirt pattern: http://www.crchilds.com/id15.htm
A nice and simple square cut shirt pattern, and absolutely authentic.
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Jim_Ruley
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« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2007, 06:41:50 PM »

Quote
I am looking for a 19th century man's shirt pattern.

Hi Rebecca,

Men's shirt styles changed considerably during the course of the 19th century.  What time period is your father interested in?

Two good resource books on shirts are "Thoughts on Men's Shirts" by Bill Brown, and "Shirts and Men's Haberdashery" available from R L Shep Publications.  The first has extensive photos and drawings of original shirts, while the second has a number of original patterns.  You might want to look these over and get some ideas.

Hope this helps,

Jim Ruley
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rebeccaroberts
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« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2007, 07:06:40 PM »

My dad wants a shirt for Civil War Reenactments.

-Rebecca Jane Roberts

P.S. Sorry I wasn't more specific
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Jim_Ruley
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« Reply #7 on: July 20, 2007, 08:59:11 PM »

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My dad wants a shirt for Civil War Reenactments.

Hi Rebecca,

Well, that narrows it down a little  Smiley.  However, the Civil War was right in the middle of a transition in shirt construction, so there are two main styles you might consider:

- The "squares and rectangles" shirt, so called because none of the pieces are shaped, but are brought into shape by gathering.  This was the traditional style of shirt and was being phased out, but a lot of them were still being worn.

- The "French fitted" shirt.  These started coming in in the 1850's IIRC, and became more and more shaped to the body as the century progressed.  They were still of the "pull-over" type, not split all the way down the front like a modern shirt.

Another important consideration is your dad's "persona".  Is he portraying a soldier or civilian?  If the latter, is he a laborer, an educated man, or a wealthy gentleman?  All of these will influence what his shirt is made of and whether it is white or colored.

Hope this helps,

Jim R.
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Joanna Jones
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« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2007, 05:57:08 AM »

Highly highly recommend Charlie Childs' "Holliday" shirt pattern: http://www.crchilds.com/id15.htm
A nice and simple square cut shirt pattern, and absolutely authentic.

Although they are listed under the CS patterns, would both of those shirts be appropriate for a northern laborer's shirt (Minnesota, emigrated from Ohio)?

Joanna
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Jill Kransel
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« Reply #9 on: July 21, 2007, 08:52:02 AM »

My dad wants a shirt for Civil War Reenactments.

-Rebecca Jane Roberts

P.S. Sorry I wasn't more specific

Rebecca- I guess the question we should ask is, is your dad reenacting or is he accompanying you to reenactments and would like to fit in with your reenacting peers by dressing the part. 
I think we're trying to get a better grasp in what his role is to better help Wink
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JasonWickersty
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« Reply #10 on: July 21, 2007, 08:59:26 AM »

Although they are listed under the CS patterns, would both of those shirts be appropriate for a northern laborer's shirt (Minnesota, emigrated from Ohio)?

Of course!  The Holliday is the only shirt pattern that I use for myself, and I mainly portray Federal soldiers and a middle class civilian from New Jersey and New York.  There is nothing at all specially distinguishing it as some sort of specially made Confederate shirt, only that it was a shirt worn by Henry Hollyday, Co. A, 2nd Maryland Infantry Battalion.
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rebeccaroberts
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« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2007, 05:00:30 PM »

Okay, my dad actually started going to the CWR reenactments first. He portrays/reenacts a soldier. He saw some fabric at Walmart that was kind of a red and white plaid that he really liked.

Hope this helps.

-Rebecca Jane Roberts
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ToddMorris
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« Reply #12 on: July 21, 2007, 10:18:51 PM »

Assuming that you wish to go with a basic "On The Square" Shirt there are a myriad of styling options in this style alone.     May I also refer you to this past post which details many aspects of a men's shirt. 

http://thesewingacademy.org/index.php?topic=200.0

Assuming that your wish to go with a basic shirt, if you refer to the Books that Mr. Ruley mentions you could easily draft your own "Square" pattern shirt.     When I initially learned to sew, and to make items, my primary source was the "Work Woman’s Guide".    It has one plate that shows several methods to optimize your use of cloth when making such shirts.    This plate is reproduced in William Brown's "Thoughts on Men's Shirts".   

If you lived a little closer to Ohio I would invite you to my course that I will be having in September.   Alas, that is probably not an option.    However, I would be more than willing to aid you in drafting your own shirt pattern or providing some basic measurements and options.   

Respectfully,
Todd Morris
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bevinmacrae
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« Reply #13 on: July 27, 2007, 11:46:28 AM »

Mr. Morris,

Could you post more info on your course in Ohio in september, perhaps under the "educational opportunities"? I will be going to Ohio in septemeber and if there's a chance I could stay a few days and take your course, I'd like to!
~bevin
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Bevin MacRae

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Ginny Hardcastle
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« Reply #14 on: October 07, 2009, 05:29:58 PM »

I would like to make an overshirt that my husband could use in both civilian and military settings (1860's). 

I like the Hollyday pattern by Charlie Childs.  The problem is that the largest size offered is size 44 - 46.  My husband has a 46 inch chest and I am thinking that he needs a size 48 for an overshirt.  Would it be difficult to enlarge this pattern or would I be better off looking for a different pattern entirely?  If I do enlarge the Childs pattern what steps would I need to take?  Is there anything specific to this pattern that would be helpful for me to know during construction?

In looking at pictures of overshirts, I've noticed that military overshirts may have tape trim or be plain.  It seems that civilian overshirts have no trim.  Is this an accurate observation?

Ginny Hardcastle
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J-Waters
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« Reply #15 on: October 10, 2009, 11:26:26 PM »

This book is about grading, making smaller or larger. I didn't see a shirt, but you will get the idea. Printed in 1915.
http://www.archive.org/details/scienceofgrading00simo
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Phil Graf
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« Reply #16 on: October 12, 2009, 03:22:44 PM »

I would like to make an overshirt that my husband could use in both civilian and military settings (1860's). 

I like the Hollyday pattern by Charlie Childs.  The problem is that the largest size offered is size 44 - 46.  My husband has a 46 inch chest and I am thinking that he needs a size 48 for an overshirt.  Would it be difficult to enlarge this pattern or would I be better off looking for a different pattern entirely?  If I do enlarge the Childs pattern what steps would I need to take?  Is there anything specific to this pattern that would be helpful for me to know during construction?

In looking at pictures of overshirts, I've noticed that military overshirts may have tape trim or be plain.  It seems that civilian overshirts have no trim.  Is this an accurate observation?

Ginny Hardcastle

Ginny,

A loose-fitting shirt worn over another shirt won't need to be sized up.  I've worn two normal (non-overshirts) shirts at a time before, and there's no fit issues.  Even if you still want to make the overshirt larger, the Hollyday pattern is mostly squares, and would not be difficult to enlarge. 

Also, civilian overshirts are occasionally seen with trim, but are most often untrimmed.  Either option would be appropriate.  A trimmed overshirt would not peg its wearer as being in the military.
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