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Author Topic: Undersleeves for 1865  (Read 1192 times)
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KatelynH
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« on: January 16, 2018, 07:50:35 AM »

I've tried to look up this answer but can't find anything.

So, I'm making an 1865 dress.  The dress is based on this one at the MET:

https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/107654?rpp=20&pg=66&rndkey=20131130&ao=on&ft=*&deptids=8&when=A.D.+1800-1900&what=Dresses&img=1

My silk is red shot black and I bought some antique Maltese lace for the evening bodice (the original is not Maltese, but I found several yards of Maltese so I'm going to use that). I'm still looking for some nice black lace for the day bodice sleeves.

However, my question is for undersleeves to go under the day bodice.  When you pull up the MET site, you can clearly see that the sleeves are coat sleeves.  However, pulled this image off pinterest before I found the MET site: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/451978512596614317/.  To me, it looked more like a funnel sleeve so I cut sleeves before I found that webpage and made them sort of funnel like, such as in this original from the Sigal Museum:

http://fripperiesandfobs.tumblr.com/image/104090121128

I do plan on putting the black lace on them eventually, but also plan on wearing the dress without it in the meantime until I can find the right kind of lace.  What kind of undersleeves would be worn with this dress?  It looks like open undersleeves would look really nice (and that's kind of what I want) but I know by the early-mid 1860's, most undersleeves were closed.  But by the 1870's, it seems like open undersleeves (or at least a little lace on the edge of the sleeve) is a thing as opposed to a closed cuff.  When does this change take place?  Would it look totally off if I had open undersleeves for this gown?  Or should I stick with closed?

Also, I notice the original bodice has a bit of small black lace on the neckline.  I'm assuming this would have been original and there would have been a white stand up collar on the other side.  I think that would look really cool, but want to make sure that lace could be original and that was an actual thing.

Edited to add one more question: What are the four buttons on the waistline on the day bodice for?  There is one on the center front, and three in the back.  Were they used to attach something?  Were there more of them around and they were decorative?  Just trying to decide if I should add them to my dress or not.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2018, 12:21:19 PM by KatelynH » Logged

EKorsmo
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« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2018, 01:15:34 AM »

Well, the upside to undersleeves is that you can make as many styles as you want and switch them out. Wink

Are you intending to keep the funnel sleeves or try to alter them into coat sleeves? I apologize for my reading comprehension failure, but thesis research has taken over my brain.

Most of the open undersleeve fashion plates that I remember seeing are from closer to 1860, when the really ridiculously wide sleeves are in style. Scanning the 1865 Godey's shows lots of narrow undersleeves with deep, highly decorated cuffs.  [I can't tell if the bride in the January plate has open undersleeves with her slightly-wider coat sleeves, or if that's just a bunch of ruffles--but every other figure has slim coat sleeves with closed undersleeves.]
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KatelynH
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« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2018, 07:34:46 PM »

I'm most likely going to keep the funnel sleeves.  I'm not opposed to making closed undersleeves to wear for this dress (or using any of my others) but I think open undersleeves would look really nice under it.  I just wanted to know if there was any evidence for open undersleeves being used at this time or if they are primarily closed.  It does seem that slim sleeves reign during the late war years, though, which would explain the predominate use of closed undersleeves.
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2018, 01:53:21 PM »

 Sleeves echoing the shape of the dress sleeve are always appropriate.
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Regards,
Elizabeth
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