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Author Topic: Yokes on shirt as opposed to bands on shoulders  (Read 8435 times)
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Eileen Hook
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« on: June 20, 2017, 04:49:02 PM »

Curious - when did the separate yoke at the top of the back of men's shirts come into common use? The majority of shirts in museum collections are only photographed from the front, and no amount of zooming in gives one x-ray vision!  I've seen interior linings on the backs and fronts, and the typical shoulder strap, but what about the full-across-the-back-yoke as in today's dress shirts?

Thanks!

Eileen Hook
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Eileen
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Carolann Schmitt
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« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2017, 07:25:16 AM »

I will have my box of original shirts out next week and will look at what I have. I know I have one beautiful white dress shirt c.1850s with a yoke, and IIRC there are a few more in that box.

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Carolann
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Carolann Schmitt - Only a historian understands how much you need to know in order to recognize how much you don't know. - Elizabeth Ann Coleman
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Eileen Hook
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« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2017, 08:33:39 AM »

Thank you, that would be great! Are any of these shirts 'not white'? patterned, perhaps?
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Eileen
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« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2017, 09:18:57 AM »

All of my original shirts are white.

Carolann
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Carolann Schmitt - Only a historian understands how much you need to know in order to recognize how much you don't know. - Elizabeth Ann Coleman
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Eileen Hook
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« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2017, 10:59:37 AM »

Ok, i assume it would be safe to expect non-white shirts to follow the same pattern as white? Particularly if they are the 'newer style' cut?
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Eileen
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EKorsmo
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« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2017, 01:58:17 PM »

I found an 1879 patent application which suggests that yoked shirts were in common use by the end of 1870s (Specifications and Drawings of Patents Issued from the U.S. Patent Office, page 161):

"Sack-shirts, so called, formerly worn, were straight loose-fitting garments. and often with the back lined the whole width and down to the waist; but the kind or style almost universally worn at the present day is made with a yoke or double piece of cloth resting on the shoulders and designed to fit the shoulders quite smoothly. The back of the shirt, being joined to this, requires some fullness, (more or more or less, according to the shape or size of the wearer,) which is sewed to the yoke by gathering in or plaiting the fullness into the yoke. To line the back the whole length of the yoke would require both thicknesses to be gathered, which would make it very difficult to iron both parts smoothly."
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Joseph Stevens
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« Reply #6 on: June 22, 2017, 06:27:34 PM »

I believe the Shep book has a pattern for one as early as 1845/46. Judging by advertisements, it seemed to be a common feature on ready-made shirts by the mid-1850's.
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Joseph Stevens


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Eileen Hook
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« Reply #7 on: June 22, 2017, 06:35:37 PM »

The Shep book? I'm not familiar with that source, but it sounds useful. Please elaborate!
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Eileen
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Brian Baird
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« Reply #8 on: June 23, 2017, 08:08:39 AM »

I believe that Joseph is talking about the book SHIRTS & MEN'S HABERDASHERY 1840s TO 1920s by R.L. Shep and Gail Cariou. It is out of print. In this book, there is a pattern with a yoke from a 1857 GODEY'S as well as a Devere 1859 pattern with a yoke.
Brian Baird
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Eileen Hook
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« Reply #9 on: June 23, 2017, 09:20:12 AM »

Thank you for this resource - found it on Amazon for $37! Order placed!
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Eileen
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Joseph Stevens
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« Reply #10 on: July 05, 2017, 12:04:19 PM »

I believe that Joseph is talking about the book SHIRTS & MEN'S HABERDASHERY 1840s TO 1920s by R.L. Shep and Gail Cariou. It is out of print. In this book, there is a pattern with a yoke from a 1857 GODEY'S as well as a Devere 1859 pattern with a yoke.
Brian Baird


That'd be the book. It also includes, as I said before, a pattern draft from Journal des Desmoiselles, 1845.

As has been discussed before elsewhere on TSA, it does not include a lot of patterns dated to the period of this board.  There's only four pre-1865:

  • Journal des Demoiselles, 1845
  • Godey's, 1857
  • Devere, 1859
  • Devere, 1862

The Godey's pattern is available for free online from a few different places: http://www.victoriana.com/Mens-Clothing/shirt-1857.html

And while I haven't used the 1859 Devere draft, I did use the 1862 version last week, and there's some pretty major errors in the pattern plate. And the descriptive text isn't fully accurate to the finished pattern pieces, either.
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Joseph Stevens


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Eileen Hook
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« Reply #11 on: July 05, 2017, 12:20:36 PM »

I see what you mean about the pattern in Shep's book - perhaps a case of 'we all know how this is done, no need to explain'? ( aka 'make in the usual way')

Eileen
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Eileen
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Joseph Stevens
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« Reply #12 on: July 05, 2017, 12:25:03 PM »

I see what you mean about the pattern in Shep's book - perhaps a case of 'we all know how this is done, no need to explain'? ( aka 'make in the usual way')

Eileen

No, that was not the issue here. When I said that the pattern plate has errors, I meant it.
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Joseph Stevens


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« Reply #13 on: July 05, 2017, 01:05:59 PM »

As you've made or tried to make the pattern, you know better than I.
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Eileen
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