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Author Topic: Solid White Sunbonnet  (Read 927 times)
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Mrs.HRay
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« on: February 14, 2017, 08:44:21 AM »

Good Morning!

I am curious to know if a sunbonnet can be done in a solid white cotton of semi sheer or opaque fabric.  I think it would be exceeding comfortable to wear in the hottest months for sun protection with the least amount of heat absorption.  Would this have been done or where whites restricted to sheer fabric only?
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EKorsmo
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« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2017, 02:43:25 PM »

Light colors and lightweight fabric are definitely a good idea for keeping cool.  Here are a few originals which seem to be opaque white cotton:

American, mid-19th century


American, c. 1840


American, c. 1860
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Jessamyn
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« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2017, 07:48:55 PM »

The only thing to remember is that it's a trade-off: the lighter the color and the lighter the weight, the less sun protection the fabric will provide.

Fortunately for we moderns, we have sunscreen!
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Robin C
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« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2017, 10:22:38 AM »

I have seen reference(it's been a while) to a white sunbonnet with the inside brim being blue--would definitely cut the glare
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Mrs.HRay
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« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2017, 07:41:10 PM »

Thank you EKorsmo for those pictures, those are lovely! I was hoping to use the compendium's sunbonnet instructions and replace slats with cording (as was suggested on a couple of other threads) but the brim sticking out farther than the curtain is very nice as well.

Jessamyn, I have but two shades: pale and lobster, even with my current slatbonnet, sunscreen is a must! (The smell of coconut is completely period correct right!?!)

Thank you for pointing that out Robin, I had not considered extra glare from a lighter fabric.  I love the blue and white color combination, it reminds me of the ocean and the beach 😀!  If I can find a light blue in a pretty design I might have to copy that!
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Jessamyn
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« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2017, 12:25:59 PM »

After taking a better look, I'm dubious about the dating on this one.


American, c. 1860

That high puff in the back is more in line with 1830s and 1890s examples (as are the fussy ruffles all over) . I'd like to see it from the back, but unfortunately that's the only view. I'd be cautious about using it as a basis for a repro absent securely dated similar examples.
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2017, 07:33:50 PM »

There are some more securely-dated, lower-fullness sunbonnets (that would lean me toward 50s 60s) that have the depth of curtain, and the little frill, and the narrow-hemmed front ties, though. I agree with you on the high placement of the fullness in the back.
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Regards,
Elizabeth
Jessamyn
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« Reply #7 on: February 18, 2017, 01:01:11 PM »

Oh, yes, I didn't mean to say a mid-century sunbonnet couldn't have ruffles. It was more that the ruffle on ruffle on ruffle struck me as not typical of 1860s aesthetics.
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EKorsmo
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« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2017, 10:05:20 PM »

Thanks, Jessamyn.  I was going off of the museum's dates, but now that you mentioned it, I feel embarrassed for not noticing just how high the crown is on that last one.
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