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Author Topic: Cuff construction for bishop sleeve  (Read 1677 times)
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Miss Whitlock
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« on: February 08, 2017, 04:14:52 PM »

Hi! I am working on my first dress since I got the Dressmakers Guide, and I have a question.

In the book, there are instructions for how to do the cuff (gather sleeve edge, stitch to long edge of cuff, enclose).

In my modern sewing course it told me to make a placket, so the grain would be straight where the overlap is. Like this:


BUT if you just gather the sleeve to the cuff without building a placket for the overlap, you end up with the sleeve being pulled to overlap itself so the cuff can close. Like this:

 \    \        /   <Sleeve, with seam merely left open and then pulled to overlap.
  \\\\\ /////
  [__-]__]       < Cuff


It still works, either way, but I am wondering what the originals do. What say you?

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Maggie Koenig
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« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2017, 05:53:06 PM »

Original women's sleeves do not have a placket.  The opening is finished by double folding the seam allowances back and whip stitching or straight stitching in place. 
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Maggie Koenig
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Miss Whitlock
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« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2017, 11:57:44 PM »

So, you don't bind it or sew in a placket piece... do you gather it smaller than the cuff so the cuff has a tab with the buttonhole, instead of dragging the whole sleeve to overlap?
(Sorry about the ASCII symbols, I can't find all the pictures I want.  Tongue )

Like this when it is flat:
|                                   |  <sleeve, with underarm seam unsewn
\                                  /
 \                                /
  |||||||||||||||||||||||||| __       <sleeve is gathered to cuff
  [o___________________-]     <cuff extends beyond edge of sleeve on one side, so when it buttons it pulls the edges of the sleeve just closed, not past.

Is that what is done? Huh
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Jessamyn
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« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2017, 02:31:26 PM »

No, you simply allow the cuff and the opening to lap one side over the other slightly.

Keep in mind that ladies' waists use very tiny buttons, and that both buttons and buttonholes in this period are usually set very close to the edge, unlike now. There isn't as much lap as you're probably thinking.

If you click through this link, you can see some extremely close-up views of a pair of undersleeves at the ModeMuseum Provincie Antwerpen. Be sure to click the third icon from the left under the photo to see it full size, and use the left-right arrows to see all ten images of these lovely undersleeves.

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/394768723566436359/

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Elizabeth
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« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2017, 11:58:15 AM »

Dittos with comments above; the pattern is giving a non-historical method fora woman's sleeve. What pattern is it? Might be one to avoid.
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Elizabeth
Miss Whitlock
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« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2017, 11:10:20 AM »

 Smiley I wasn't using a pattern, just my own head (the image is off the internet, to illustrate aforesaid head). I would definitely avoid using it though...   Cheesy

That is a suprisingly simple solution! *Overthinks everything*  Grin
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