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SabrinaM
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« on: August 10, 2016, 03:01:44 PM »

I am about to start patterning out my new 1867dress. It's going to be in a cotton print; I have a green repro print for it. I plan on constructing it the same way as the forum describes these sort of dresses for the earlier part of the decade, but have it in a later style so it will have narrower coat sleeves, a small standing collar, and a gored skirt.

Thinking out how to construct it, though, raised a question that I couldn't find an answer to on the board. I totally get how to attach the skirt to a bodice waistband, but how does one attach the waistband to the bodice? I want my bodice to have a waistband that I will sew the skirt to, instead of doing piping or a scrap waistband.

Thanks in advance!
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Jessamyn
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« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2016, 09:09:55 AM »

You take a totally different approach if you are sewing a skirt to a scrap waistband than if you are sewing it to a visible waistband.

With a scrap waistband, you sew the skirt to the waistband, then set the waistband inside the bodice and stitch in the ditch of the piping.

With a visible waistband, the waistband is actually a part of the bodice, and usually the lining is the complete length, the waistband being essentially a decorative pieced element of the fashion fabric.

That means it isn't used as a utility piece to set the skirt to; you have to set the skirt directly to the bottom of the waistband/lining in situ, just as you would on a dress without a waistband if you chose not to use a scrap waistband.

With this dress with a visible waistband from Vintage Textile...



...you can see, on the inside, the stitching where the top of the waistband was sewn down when it was applied to the full lining; the bottom was piped; and then the skirt was set directly to that bottom edge.



Less commonly, as in this example from Ebay...



...the waistband and its lining have encased the fashion fabric and its lining at the bottom, but still the bottom edge of the waistband has been piped and the skirt would have been directly attached to that bottom edge once the bodice was complete.



Clear as mud?
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SabrinaM
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« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2016, 04:14:10 PM »

OH! I get it. That makes total sense. That way it's the bodice and the waistband supporting the skirt, not just a waistband. Thank you for the explanation and the examples!
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Jessamyn
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« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2016, 05:48:58 PM »

Yes!  Grin

It also means that if you make two or more bodices for a dress, you aren't stuck with a waistband that's supposed to go outside on the day body and inside on the evening body, which would not work. You'd make a waistband to fit inside regardless, and then the outside can have whatever features you want. (Note that when you're doing a two-bodied dress, it's pretty common to make the waistband out of fashion fabric, in case you have any slippage or don't baste them together as accurately as possible, but not because that waistband is intended to show.)

Another thing to consider if you do anything in silk or wool: In the postwar period you're doing, another approach to the waistband issue was to have a self-fabric belt, which gives a heightened waistband effect and can be left off for a different look. Check out this ca. 1866 dress a transformation in the Museum f?r Angewandte Kunst K?ln:

https://www.kulturelles-erbe-koeln.de/documents/obj/05111069/rba_c009615
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K Krewer
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« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2016, 10:00:53 AM »

[/img]

Another thing to consider if you do anything in silk or wool: In the postwar period you're doing, another approach to the waistband issue was to have a self-fabric belt, which gives a heightened waistband effect and can be left off for a different look.

I can't, for some reason, pull up the page Jessamyn cited -- but I do have a number of late 65 - to - postwar dresses that have a self-fabric belt with sash ends or other pieces attached -- some of which make the dress look like a basque and skirt.  That's another useful option.

[/URL] [/img]
« Last Edit: August 12, 2016, 10:09:36 AM by K Krewer » Logged

K Krewer
SabrinaM
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« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2016, 04:04:52 PM »

Thanks for all the interesting information! Sorry for the late reply. I was away on vacation.
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Joseph Stevens
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« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2016, 09:38:05 PM »

Less commonly, as in this example from Ebay...



...the waistband and its lining have encased the fashion fabric and its lining at the bottom, but still the bottom edge of the waistband has been piped and the skirt would have been directly attached to that bottom edge once the bodice was complete.

I had always observed the exact opposite to be true; that the method shown here with a waistband that fully encases the bottom edge was more common on originals than the other.
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Joseph Stevens


"Oh, I like tedious, practical subjects. What I don't like are tedious, practical people." -Oscar Wilde; An Ideal Husband
K Krewer
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Madame Goldschmidt


« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2016, 02:31:22 PM »

Less commonly, as in this example from Ebay...

...the waistband and its lining have encased the fashion fabric and its lining at the bottom, but still the bottom edge of the waistband has been piped and the skirt would have been directly attached to that bottom edge once the bodice was complete.

I had always observed the exact opposite to be true; that the method shown here with a waistband that fully encases the bottom edge was more common on originals than the other.

My observations are that they are both common, and I'll add two more variations -- where BOTH the bottom edge of the waistband, AND the top edge, have been piped,





or where only the TOP edge has been piped. 


Lots of variations!
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K Krewer
Elizabeth
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« Reply #8 on: August 27, 2016, 03:17:15 PM »

I love seeing all the original examples! It really helps us to see the wide range of "normal" available to sewists in the era. (Doesn't help a speck in deciding which variation to use for myself, of course!)
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Elizabeth
Jessamyn
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« Reply #9 on: August 28, 2016, 08:01:25 PM »

Lovely examples!
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