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Marcus P
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« on: June 28, 2016, 01:54:12 PM »

I'm a soon to be civilian, venturing into the constructing my own clothes. My wife gave me the wonderful Christmas gift of a printed copy of The Tailor's Guide (Compaing & Devere 1855) in a nice big binder. I have managed to work out the basic pattern for a vest (thanks to her assistance, and information found here while I awaited approval of my membership). I'm now ready to begin my first attempt to build an wearable vest and need some help making sure I have all the parts I need to make the vest. As I understand it the parts I need are as follows:

Left & Right Front Pieces
Left & Right Back Pieces
Left & Right Collar Pieces
Left & Right Front Interfacing
Left & Right Front Padding
Left & Right Front Lining Pieces
Left & Right Back Lining Pieces
4 welts for 2 lower pockets
2 welts for 1 breast pocket.
Left & Right Front Facings (along button line on each half)
Left & Right Lower Facings (along bottom of Fashion fabric)

Thanks in advance

-Marcus Petrella

***Edit, moved post to proper discussion area***
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Jim_Ruley
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« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2016, 06:14:44 PM »

Mr Petrella,

Welcome to the Sewing Academy!  You might find these tutorial threads useful:

http://thesewingacademy.org/index.php?topic=1780.0

http://thesewingacademy.org/index.php?topic=6715.0

http://thesewingacademy.org/index.php?topic=2531.0

What style of vest are you making?  For a typical shawl collar vest, the top collar and front facings are cut in one piece, or with no joints visible on the outside.

DeVere's draft has a straight center back, so you can cut the back as one piece on the fold, along with the back lining.

There are several ways of making welt pockets.  Depending on your method, you may only need one welt piece per pocket.

Hope this is useful,

Jim Ruley
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Marcus P
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« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2016, 06:11:23 AM »

Mr. Ruley,

Thank you, this has been very helpful. I'm planning on making a shawl collar, as it seems to have been quite popular. I plan to use a charcoal grey, lightweight wool I have from an abandoned project. The front facing and top collar being of a single piece is something I had overlooked, but makes perfect sense. I've been reading through many of your tutorials, they're quite helpful.

Thank you, I feel like I have a clearer understanding of how to put this vest together.

-Marcus
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Joseph Stevens
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« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2016, 12:52:33 PM »

For a typical shawl collar vest, the top collar and front facings are cut in one piece, or with no joints visible on the outside.

Out of curiosity, Jim, would you mind sharing your method for patterning that specific piece?

The method I've always used is to cut a forepart and the under collar, sew the dart in the neck edge and then sew the under collar on. From that point I draw in the edge I'd like for the facing/top collar and cut along it, using that as the pattern piece to cut the facing from (remembering to include seam allowance) and the remaining chunk for the forepart lining. It's not entirely foolproof due to the shape the dart gives which then become a completely flat piece in the resulting pattern, but I haven't noticed this having a majorly ill effect in the fit of the final vest.

Do you do similar?
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Joseph Stevens


"Oh, I like tedious, practical subjects. What I don't like are tedious, practical people." -Oscar Wilde; An Ideal Husband
Jim_Ruley
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« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2016, 06:31:10 PM »

For a typical shawl collar vest, the top collar and front facings are cut in one piece, or with no joints visible on the outside.

The method I've always used is to cut a forepart and the under collar, sew the dart in the neck edge and then sew the under collar on. From that point I draw in the edge I'd like for the facing/top collar and cut along it, using that as the pattern piece to cut the facing from (remembering to include seam allowance) and the remaining chunk for the forepart lining. It's not entirely foolproof due to the shape the dart gives which then become a completely flat piece in the resulting pattern, but I haven't noticed this having a majorly ill effect in the fit of the final vest.


Hi Joseph,

I think your method should work well, as long as the material does not shrink or stretch significantly when you sew and press the dart seam.

I do a similar thing, but with the paper pattern.  I draw lines on the forepart locating the facing and lining edges (1" apart for 1/2" seams).  Then I trace the forepart on a separate sheet of pattern paper from the dart down to the bottom, and up the back edge.  I pivot the dart closed, and copy the neck edge up to the top, and down the back edge (this will intersect with the previous tracing at some point).

Now, I mark 1" in from the neck edge to account for the seams, and lay the undercollar in place on the tracing.  I trace around the outer edge, back seam and neck edge where it extends beyond the shoulder.

The difference from your method is there is no possibility of stretch or shrinkage because all of the pieces are flat.  Of course actual vest materials may shrink or stretch slightly, which is why I always set the front edge of a shawl collar vest lining by hand.

Hope this helps,

Jim R.
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