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Author Topic: Caps- use and design  (Read 5060 times)
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Miss Whitlock
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« on: May 30, 2016, 08:50:28 PM »

Hi, it is me again. Smiley

I am cooking indoors at an event soon, for the guests. I have my food handlers license and all that,  but I need a hair covering. I would like to not wear a bonnet; are caps appropriate for this sort of thing?

Misc. info: I am 21 years old, I will be wearing a wrapper pretending to be a dress.

Is a proper cap going to cover most of my hair?

Would it be something that a homesteader/farm wife in Oregon would have worn?

Thanks! I appreciate being allowed to tap into your hard won knowledge. Smiley

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Jessamyn
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« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2016, 05:31:14 PM »

A cap is definitely a far better choice than a bonnet for this situation. Are you doing 1860s? Caps were an entirely optional headwear by that time (except for English servants), but still a totally viable option. They were used by all levels of society and in all levels of fanciness, from plain muslin sleeping caps to lace, net, and ribbon confections.

Neither cap nor bonnet is going to cover the very front of your hair, but many caps will cover the rest. If that's your goal, you want to look for one of the "bag" styles that encloses your back hair.

Another option to consider is a hair net. Nets were a decorative accessory in this period, but there's no reason they couldn't serve their modern purpose as well.

You might find my Pinterest board of caps and nets helpful. It is, I admit, a hodgepodge of styles, but it is confined to the Civil War era and just before, and there is definitely something for everyone there.

https://www.pinterest.com/jessamynrb/1859-65-caps-nets/
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2016, 11:47:15 AM »

Neatly dressed hair, uncovered, is also an option historically.
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Elizabeth
MaryDee
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« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2016, 02:26:16 PM »

Unfortunately Miss Whitlock also has to meet 21st century requirements for food handlers, so must have her hair covered.

If, like me, she has a short modern hair style, a cap might be better to hide the short hair.  Otherwise a decorative hair net (but not one of those rayon "reenactor" nets).  In either case, would one of those "invisible" nets (available everywhere) be acceptable to cover whatever hair isn't covered by the period coverings?

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Elizabeth
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« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2016, 10:32:49 AM »

Neatly dressed hair with one of the food-handling-approved fine hairnets over the whole thing would be visually unobtrusive, in my opinion. If the gathery-bits are positioned behind the ears, the fine elastic cords can run right along the hairline. And those kinds of very fine modern nets often come in colors to blend with the hair color.
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Elizabeth
K Krewer
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Madame Goldschmidt


« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2016, 01:05:30 PM »



What about an 1840's cap like this?  (borrowed from a very nice blog)

or this?

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/175570085447921997/
« Last Edit: June 02, 2016, 01:08:40 PM by K Krewer » Logged

K Krewer
Miss Whitlock
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« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2016, 03:25:10 PM »

Thanks, this is a good place to start. Smiley

Am I correct in thinking that in general, the less wealthy people would have had less fancy caps?
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K Krewer
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Madame Goldschmidt


« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2016, 10:34:25 AM »

I think that they would have been made out of less expensive materials, such as muslin, mull, linen, spotted swiss, rather than nets, laces, etc.
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K Krewer
Elizabeth
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« Reply #8 on: June 04, 2016, 09:08:08 PM »

But keep in mind that for 60s, a very young woman is less and less likely to be using a cap, and it'll be shaped for the 60s regardless, even if she's very working class.
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Elizabeth
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