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Author Topic: Fabric for Coats  (Read 2663 times)
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EKorsmo
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« on: May 10, 2016, 10:03:26 AM »

Going through my site's sales records, I've run across a number of fun fabrics for men's coats.  Are any of these still available?

cashmerette [cotton with a light nap, said to resemble cashmere]
alpaca [alpaca fleece weft on a silk or cotton warp]
mixed stuff [likely linen warp and wool weft, from what I've found so far--if so, I'm unsure if/how this differs from linsey-woolsey]
lambswool
beaver [beaver cloth or coating: "a stout woolen cloth with a raised nap", said to resemble beaver fur]
russit cord [Textiles in America gives both "russet" and "cord" as stout, somewhat coarse woolens].

For completeness, they also mention selling coats of corduroy and of tweed, though I'm less perplexed about where to look for those. Smiley
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BetsyConnolly
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« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2016, 01:19:05 PM »

Are there dates with these?
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Betsy Connolly
Living History Society of Minnesota
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EKorsmo
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« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2016, 01:37:17 PM »

1854-55.  Maybe two 1844 references.

The russet cord [a "gent's drab russic cord coat"/ "gent's drab russit coard coat"] is supposedly 1844--May and August, respectively, purchased by a clerk.  However, the man buying them didn't arrive until 1850, so I think there was a transcription error and it's meant to be "1854".  The other 1844 reference is to a "tiger coat"; I've found no period sources which mention such a thing.

The cashmerette ("cachmarette"), alpaca ("alpacea"), beaver , and something I've not found called "taramata" (style or material?) are listed in June 1854; the coats are among other goods being sent to Fort Nisqually from Fort Vancouver.  The rest are from employee accounts labelled 1854-1855: two "alpaca oxonion coats" are sold in May and July (to Hawaiians); tweed shooting coats are sold in February, March, May, and July, and a "mixed stuff shooting coat" in February.  A "corduroy  frock" is bought in October 1854, and one of "fine lambswool" in February 1855.
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Jessamyn
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« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2016, 06:21:30 PM »


mixed stuff [likely linen warp and wool weft, from what I've found so far--if so, I'm unsure if/how this differs from linsey-woolsey]


Supposedly, stuff was a worsted fabric and linsey-woolsey was a woollen one, but I don't know how carefully that distinction was observed in the mid-19th century.
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Elaine Kessinger
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« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2016, 06:18:37 AM »

William Booth, Draper has just in a wool cord fabric in black and a beaver coating (70% wool, 15% mohair, 15% nylon) in a "drab" dark grey-brown color.
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EKorsmo
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« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2016, 10:15:39 AM »

Thank you, ladies!
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BetsyConnolly
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« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2016, 11:29:38 AM »

I KNEW I had seen beaver cloth somewhere recently but couldn't remember where. Thanks, Elaine!
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Betsy Connolly
Living History Society of Minnesota
In The Past Lane - my blog
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