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Author Topic: Fabric checking for a batch of dresses  (Read 10075 times)
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Miss Whitlock
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« on: March 06, 2016, 03:32:44 PM »

Whew, fabric shopping is harder than it looks! Kuddos to you all who do this frequently. :-)

I have about 20 girls dresses to make for the site I work for, and I am working on the shopping list. How do these look?



That is the best one I found so far, but it isn't very cheerful.

I have these plaids:





My impression that plaids are pretty safe, authenticity-wise. Is that true?

Then I still have maybe eight more to find.  Embarrassed

In the category of floral-ish prints, this is what I came across:











Then, I have these large-striped, floral printed fabrics, kind of like what I have seen in wrappers. Do they look terrible? Are they wrong for kids dresses anyway?





Lastly, there are a couple geometric prints.




That last one is a navy, at least the site says it is.

That is a lot of pictures. Tongue Any thoughts on any of them? I am very new at this; is my eye any good? I found this pinterest page https://www.pinterest.com/farmingdaughter/fabric/  super useful, but I am a little scared because I couldn't find anything really similar to the swatches (motifs over stripes, geometrically spaced motifs, etc.)

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Jessamyn
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« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2016, 06:17:28 PM »

What period are you doing?

Regardless, I'd say no for certain to the fifth floral and the two large-scale florals just after it. Too many non-mid-19th-c elements.
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EKorsmo
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« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2016, 07:01:56 PM »

The plaids are nice, though none of the florals are particularly speaking to me (the first is fun, but I'm unsure about the overlapping feathers; #2-4 I'd personally use  if they were already on hand, but would not purchase them due to the random orientation of the motifs). Have you looked at Reproduction Fabrics?  They have some pretty things, if only for reference. Hancock's of Paducah also has a nice selection of repros, and they sometimes have good sales.

Avoid large motifs on kid's dresses; I've seen period advice which recommend buying small-scale prints for women's clothing, so that they won't look outlandish if remade for children.
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Miss Whitlock
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« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2016, 01:40:45 PM »

The period is around 1850-1860. I know it is vague, but the board has not yet set a date for me to use. I generally go with 1863-1865 since you all have so much research posted about it. Smiley

Oh, dear, I was afraid that those florals were off. I will try the reproduction fabric site.

Gotcha, large motifs are a no-no on the kids dresses.

Whew, here goes round 2 of shopping.  Tongue

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Miss Whitlock
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« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2016, 03:28:39 PM »

The Hanncocks link was really amazing. How did I do this round?

1. Motifs are arranged in lines, and oriented in a pattern instead of randomly, and the print is in distinct colors instead of sort of washed together.

2.The motifs are distinctive, and there is some space between them. They are line drawings in one color.

3.The motifs are distinct and arranged in lines and all oriented the same direction. The background has a sort of winding design on it that I think I saw on some extant prints, and it isn't too prominent anyway.

4.Distinct motifs arranged in lines, over a background that is simple and not random.

5.The motifs are arranged in lines. I don't know about those vines in between, or the sort of random feel of the light spots.

6.Strongly geometrically patterned motifs. Also, I think the bright color will look nice in pictures. Wink

7.The stripes with the motif seems similar to the extant patterns I looked at.

8.Not as easy to see, but the strictly in-line placement of the motifs, and the defined colors in them are what made me choose this one.

9.This one is kind of iffy, but I grabbed it because it has the motifs in lines, and there seemed to be a fairly reasonable amount of space around them.


That is a lot of images. Tongue Sorry. It is only about half of what I found; the most doubtful half. :-P

Any red flags? Are any of my reasons leading me astray?

Thanks so much for your input, it is really helping me get a good set of standards. :-)
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Jessamyn
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« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2016, 05:34:15 PM »

Much better this time around! None of these make me want to hit the buzzer.  Cheesy

My least favorites are 3 and 8, because medallion-shaped motifs usually seem to have more space around them in this period (they get closer later). And I'm also on the fence about 9 -- the motifs themselves are great, but I wish the curvy lines around them were either more organized or more vine-like, not this sort of almost-but-not-quite-organized look.

On #5, tiny vines in backgrounds were very common in the '50s and hung on into the early '60s -- and that color was very popular for children.
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Ginger Lane
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« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2016, 08:47:33 AM »

That second batch is terrific! My particular favorites are 3-6.
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Sue Leurgans
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« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2016, 04:54:56 PM »

Like the 2nd batch also,
Assuming there is some budget conscientiousness,   this site as a few possibilities. More of an FYI.

http://www.5bucksayard.com/items/Reproduction-Fabrics/list.htm
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Sue Leurgans
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Miss Whitlock
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« Reply #8 on: March 09, 2016, 05:22:29 PM »

Whew, thanks! I am working on saving all these resources in to my mental and work hard drives.  Cheesy
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2016, 11:00:10 AM »

I like the double pink in the middle of the second batch. Those are great on girls! (And on tiny boys.)

One thing to look at is contrast; a lot of the prints designed for quilting are really low-contrast, which is quite opposite a period mentality for a cotton print! Good color contrast and visibility is a positive.
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Elizabeth
Heidi Hollister
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« Reply #10 on: March 17, 2016, 04:30:26 PM »

I have made a pre-teen dress from that double pink (#5) you showed.  It makes up beautifully and it's a great choice.  Get that one for sure.   MUCH better selection the second time around.  Reds and Blues are popular trail colors to make up into "indian shirts" for trade as they were more valuable to the native american population than other colors.  And red is a nice color fast color.  Smiley
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Paula
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« Reply #11 on: March 17, 2016, 08:07:57 PM »

I have to disagree with Heidi.  My experience with modern reds is that they "crock" (rub off) on whites pretty badly.  Not to say you shouldn't use them, just a word of caution.
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2016, 08:35:07 PM »

I'd agree... period Turkey red process produces a very color-fast red, but that's not the common process now, so modern reds will crock off dreadfully, which is really disappointing.
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Elizabeth
Miss Whitlock
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« Reply #13 on: March 18, 2016, 05:18:01 PM »

Thanks for the warning.  Smiley That could end up very frustrating.

Interesting fact: the "indian shirts" share the taste of of our modern volunteers: I get far more people who want to wear red and blue. Even awesome colors like green and brown and purple are sort of second-best to a lot of our volunteers.
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