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Author Topic: Corset Boning Placement  (Read 4046 times)
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Allison vV
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« on: December 03, 2015, 02:36:52 PM »

I'm taking my corset design from this original at the Manchester Art Gallery (I wish there was a picture of the back!). The description says that there are two parallel bones each side of the centre back. This will place my grommets 1" from my spring. This seems pretty far; what do you think? What if I were to place one bone on either side of the grommets -- was that done?
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Allison van Vegten


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Allison vV
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« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2015, 02:50:56 PM »

I did find some examples on the Met of corsets (1880's) with boning on either side of the grommets.

I'm eager to hear anyone's thoughts, though.
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Allison van Vegten


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EKorsmo
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« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2015, 05:18:10 PM »

I'm disappointed that the Met doesn't have any pictures of the backs of their 50s/60s corsets.  They're usually really good about having alternate views. Sad

This 1864 corset from the Victoria & Albert Museum has two bones placed on the outside of the grommets (ie, bone-bone-grommet-backedge).  At Historic New England there's an 1840-1860 corded corset with cords on either side of the lacing holes (same as this corded one c. 1860 at the MFA).  Here's one from 1874 in the Chicago History Museum with bones on either side of the lacing holes.
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Carolann Schmitt
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« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2015, 09:03:38 PM »

The majority of the original corsets I saw at an exhibit of undergarments at the Met many years ago had a bone on either side of the grommets. That's how we do it in my classes and it works very well.
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Carolann Schmitt - Only a historian understands how much you need to know in order to recognize how much you don't know. - Elizabeth Ann Coleman
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Allison vV
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« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2015, 11:00:28 PM »

Thank you ladies for the advice and examples. I will do a bone on both sides of the grommets.
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Allison van Vegten


"Procrastination is the thief of time. Collar him!" Charles Dickens

"It's the job that's never started as takes longest to finish." J. R. R. Tolkien
Elizabeth
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« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2015, 08:58:17 AM »

It really helps support the lacing area, and keep it from trying to squidge to the middle. Cheesy
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Elizabeth
Allison vV
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« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2015, 03:25:35 PM »

I know exactly what you mean! I thought, "Oh, I can just try on the mock-up without boning . . . or a busk". Needless to say, that didn't work. Cheesy
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Allison van Vegten


"Procrastination is the thief of time. Collar him!" Charles Dickens

"It's the job that's never started as takes longest to finish." J. R. R. Tolkien
Allison vV
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« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2015, 09:59:42 PM »

This isn't related to boning, but it is related to corset stabilization. I saw a modern corset (in a corset lacing video) which had a waist stay tape sewn to the inside of the corset to keep the waist from stretching. I know it may not be necessary, but I was curious if this technique was used in the war years.

Also, Mrs. Clark, I wanted to say thank you so much for the corset draping/taping instructions you gave in your book. I'm so grateful for the wisdom you shared. I couldn't have done any of my historical sewing without the help of your wonderful book and this wonderful forum. From the bottom of my heart, thank you! Smiley
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Allison van Vegten


"Procrastination is the thief of time. Collar him!" Charles Dickens

"It's the job that's never started as takes longest to finish." J. R. R. Tolkien
Allison vV
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« Reply #8 on: December 09, 2015, 11:32:34 AM »

Any comments on the waist stay tape?
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Allison van Vegten


"Procrastination is the thief of time. Collar him!" Charles Dickens

"It's the job that's never started as takes longest to finish." J. R. R. Tolkien
EKorsmo
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« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2015, 07:16:24 PM »

I don't recall seeing waist tape on originals (have only seen a few interior), in period instructions, or even on any historic reproductions.
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MCBurbage
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« Reply #10 on: December 10, 2015, 05:31:58 AM »

I don't know whether waist stay tapes are common in the period covered by this board, but they certainly show up in originals by the 1880's and 1890's.  I read somewhere (sorry, I can't remember where) that it was added for stabilizing the waist as corsets were pulled tighter later in the century.  That may or may not be accurate, but it sounds reasonable.
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Mary Burbage
Allison vV
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« Reply #11 on: December 10, 2015, 11:35:26 AM »

Thank you ladies. I won't do a waist tape, but it's nice to know when, about, they might have been introduced. MCBurbage, I thought it might have been used when corsets were being laced tighter; makes sense.
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Allison van Vegten


"Procrastination is the thief of time. Collar him!" Charles Dickens

"It's the job that's never started as takes longest to finish." J. R. R. Tolkien
Elizabeth
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« Reply #12 on: January 22, 2016, 09:23:17 AM »

Late to the party: I'm glad you're finding the book useful!

I've observed waist stay tapes used in clothing (particularly in loose/adjustable front wrappers) at mid-century, but I can't recall one in a corset just then.
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Elizabeth
Carolann Schmitt
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« Reply #13 on: January 22, 2016, 07:48:13 PM »

That exhibit many years ago at the Met had two mid-19th century corsets with waist stays. I use them in my classes and have found they really help prevent the waistline from stretching, and to keep the corset waist at your waist. We sandwich them between the layers of coutil and the tape is caught in every seam.

Carolann
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Carolann Schmitt - Only a historian understands how much you need to know in order to recognize how much you don't know. - Elizabeth Ann Coleman
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #14 on: January 25, 2016, 11:32:13 AM »

Very cool! Thanks, Carolann!
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Elizabeth
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