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Author Topic: esc patterns for 1840's?  (Read 4907 times)
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Mrs Johnson
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« on: November 19, 2015, 06:09:51 PM »

can i use the girl's patterns for 1840's as well as 1860's? 

what sort of unders do they need?

thanks!
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~ Jennifer
EKorsmo
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« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2015, 09:04:37 PM »

Yes, though I'd pass on the the coat sleeve option as it's pretty distinctly '60s. 

For undies you'll want a chemise, petticoats, drawers (closed center seam for young girls), and possibly corded stays.  And Liz has a pattern for them (SA-200)!
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Mrs Johnson
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« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2015, 10:25:41 AM »

thanks!

so the stays and everything i already have for the 1860's will work?


for the dresses, do i just drop the waist down a bit?  other than fan fronts and sleeves being fuller, i'm not totally sure what the differences are lol.

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EKorsmo
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« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2015, 11:16:25 AM »

Undies should mostly make the transition.

Adult women's dresses have the front-to-back closure switch (moot for little girls with their back-fastening dresses), and corset shapes change between the '40s and '50s (I have no idea how much girls' stays would have changed). Pointed waists are also a bit more common, and the fashionable waist seems to sit lower than in the '60s.  Depending on the year, long sleeves can get a lot tighter than in the '60s (IIRC, there are some huge sleeves controlled with shirring after the Gigot sleeve collapses in the late 1830s/early 1840s, then the tight usually-bias-cut sleeves come in) .  I highly recommend Liz's study cards for the 40s/50s; they have great detail.  In the meantime here are a few on-line pictures:

Fashion Plate showing long waists.

Lots of Daguerrotypes of kids from the 40s and 50s.

Two girls, c. 1849

Check out these slim sleeved fan fronts.

Edited to fix a link.  And some grammar.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2015, 11:21:17 AM by EKorsmo » Logged

Mrs Johnson
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« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2015, 01:49:12 PM »

thank you!  i'll go look at those cards now.
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Elizabeth
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« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2015, 01:49:35 PM »

Undies make the transition entirely, no problem.

On the dresses, you can use the Bishop, but shirr down the upper part of the sleeve to about mid-bicep to do those lower-release bishops from the early 40s.

You can alter the short straight sleeve to make a variety of caps for longer sleeves; avoid the coat sleeve as tooooo 60s, but you can use the top of the short straight sleeve, extend the length to the wrist, make the whole sleeve Quite Slim to the body, and cut it on the bias for the long straight bias sleeves of the 40s. The short straight sleeve can also be cut slim and lengthened to lower bicep, and left plain or edged with self-fabric frills for the longer "short" straight sleeves of the 40s. Short puffs are also fine--keep those short, though!

Lengthen the bodices a bit; you can also extend the front and shape a point. If you want a true fan front, you'll want to slice-and-spread the fitted bodice to create more fullness; a true fan-front will need to be sliced and spread out in segments through the shoulder seam to get even more fullness (Okay, yes, I need to do a set of 40s things for girls, entirely done up as patterns...)
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Elizabeth
Mrs Johnson
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« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2015, 10:51:26 AM »

thank you!


would any of these work for the 1840's?  i'm having a heck of a time finding fabrics.  top 2 are cottons, bottom are wool.  for women's or girl's dresses.







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~ Jennifer
Dana Repp
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« Reply #7 on: November 25, 2015, 12:24:36 PM »

Your wools seem like they would be fine to use.  I like the 2nd cotton print because it reminds me of a print I saw in an 1800's fabric swatch book but I'm not confident it will work for 1840's. Hopefully somone with a more knowledge of the 40's fabrics will come along.

Another place to loo is Margo's site: http://www.reproductionfabrics.com  She has some fabrics that are pretty timeless in that they span a large number of years. It may help you to develop an eye for the 40's fabric you're looking to find.
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~Dana~

Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for human masters
Col. 3:23
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